Science Worksheets and Study Guides Second Grade. Life Cycles of Plants and Animals

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Washington Standards

WA.1. Systems (SYS)
2-3.SYS. Role of Each Part in a System
2-3.SYSC. Students know that a whole object, plant, or animal can do things that none of its parts can do by themselves.
2-3.SYSC.1. Students are expected to contrast the function of a whole object, plant, or animal with the function of one of its parts (e.g., an airplane can fly, but wings and propeller alone cannot; plants can grow, but stems and flowers alone cannot).
2-3.SYSE. Students know that similar parts may play different roles in different objects, plants, or animals.
2-3.SYSE.1. Students are expected to identify ways that similar parts can play different roles in different systems (e.g., birds may use their beaks to crack seeds while other birds use their beaks to catch fish).
WA.4. Life Science
LS1. Structures and Functions of Living Organisms
2-3.LS1. Life Cycles: In prior grades students learned that living things have basic needs and they meet those needs in various ways. In grades 2-3 students learn that all plants and animals have life cycles. They also compare the life cycles of a few common animals to see how they are similar and how they are different, and learn about the life cycles of plants. Focus should be on observable characteristics of how plants and animals change over time. An important aspect of life cycles is that plants and animals resemble their parents. This is a first step in understanding how the structures of plants and animals develop and function.
2-3.LS1A. Students know that plants have life cycles that include sprouting, growing to full size, forming fruits and flowers, shedding seeds (which begins a new cycle), and eventually dying. The details of the life cycle are different for different plants.
2-3.LS1A.1. Students are expected to describe the life cycle of a common type of plant (e.g., the growth of a fast-growing plant from seed to sprout, to adult, to fruits, flowers, and seeds).
2-3.LS1B. Students know that animals have life cycles that include being born; developing into juveniles, adolescents, then adults; reproducing (which begins a new cycle); and eventually dying. The details of the life cycle are different for different animals.
2-3.LS1B.1. Students are expected to describe the life cycle of a common type of animal (e.g., the development of a butterfly or moth from egg to larva to pupa to adult, or the development of a frog from egg to tadpole to adult frog).