Science Worksheets and Study Guides Third Grade. Life Cycles of Plants and Animals

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Kentucky Standards

KY.CC. Core Content for Assessment v.4.1
SC-EP-3.4. Unity and Diversity: Elementary students begin to observe the macroscopic features of organisms in order to make comparisons and classifications based upon likenesses and differences. Looking for patterns in the appearance and behavior of an organism leads to the notion that offspring are much like the parents, but not exactly alike.
SC-EP-3.4.1. Biological Science: Students will explain the basic needs of organisms.
SC-EP-3.4.3. Biological Science: Students will describe the basic structures and related functions of plants and animals that contribute to growth, reproduction and survival.
SC-EP-3.4.4. Biological Science: Students will describe a variety of plant and animal life cycles to understand patterns of the growth, development, reproduction and death of an organism.
SC-EP-4.7. Interdependence: Elementary learners need to become acquainted with ecosystems that are easily observable to them by beginning to study the habitats of many types of local organisms. Students begin to investigate the survival needs of different organisms and how the environment affects optimum conditions for survival.
SC-EP-4.7.1. Unifying Concepts: Students will describe the cause and effect relationships existing between organisms and their environments.
KY.PS. Program of Studies 2006
SC-P-BC. Big Idea: Biological Change (Biological Science) - The only thing certain is that everything changes. Elementary students build a foundational knowledge of change by observing slow and fast changes caused by nature in their own environment, noting changes that humans and other organisms cause in their environment, and observing fossils found in or near their environment. (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.6)
SC-P-BC-S-6. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will describe in words, pictures and/or measurements, changes that occur quickly (e.g., puddles forming from rain, cutting hair, burning paper) and changes that occur more slowly (e.g., hair growing, water evaporating in an open container, growing in height), noting the factors that influence the change
SC-P-ET. Big Idea: Energy Transformations (Unifying Concepts) - Energy transformations are inherent in almost every system in the universe - from tangible examples at the elementary level, such as heat production in simple earth and physical systems to more abstract ideas beginning at middle school, such as those transformations involved in the growth, dying and decay of living systems. The use of models to illustrate the often invisible and abstract notions of energy transfer will aid in conceptualization, especially as students move from the macroscopic level of observation and evidence (primarily elementary school) to the microscopic interactions at the atomic level (middle and high school levels). (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4)
SC-P-ET-S-3. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will observe, illustrate and explain basic relationships of plants and animals in an ecosystem (e.g., use simple food chains and webs to explain how plants and animals get food/energy to live and grow)
SC-P-ET-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that almost all kinds of food that animals eat can be traced back to plants. Food chains/webs are useful models of these relationships.
SC-P-I. Big Idea: Interdependence (Unifying Concepts) - It is not difficult for students to grasp the general notion that species depend on one another and on the environment for survival. But their awareness must be supported by knowledge of the kinds of relationships that exist among organisms, the kinds of physical conditions that organisms must cope with, the kinds of environments created by the interaction of organisms with one another and their physical surroundings, and the complexity of such systems. Elementary learners need to become acquainted with ecosystems that are easily observable to them by beginning to study the habitats of many types of local organisms. Students begin to investigate the survival needs of different organisms and how the environment affects optimum conditions for survival. (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4)
SC-P-I-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that when the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce, and others die or move to new locations.
SC-P-UD. Big Idea: Unity and Diversity (Biological Science) - All matter is comprised of the same basic elements, goes through the same kinds of energy transformations, and uses the same kinds of forces to move. Living organisms are no exception. Elementary students begin to observe the macroscopic features of organisms in order to make comparisons and classifications based upon likenesses and differences. Looking for patterns in the appearance and behavior of an organism leads to the notion that offspring are much like the parents, but not exactly alike. Emphasis at every level should be placed upon the understanding that while every living thing is composed of similar small constituents that combine in predictable ways, it is the subtle variations within these small building blocks that account for both the likenesses and differences in form and function that create the diversity of life. (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3)
SC-P-UD-S-1. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will describe the basic needs of organisms and explain how these survival needs can be met only in certain environments
SC-P-UD-S-3. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will investigate adaptations that enable animals and plants to grow, reproduce and survive (e.g., movements, body coverings, method of reproduction)
SC-P-UD-S-4. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will analyze structures of plants and animals to make inferences about the types of environments for which they are suited
SC-P-UD-S-6. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will analyze and compare a variety of plant and animal life cycles in order to uncover patterns of growth, development, reproduction and death of an organism
SC-P-UD-U-1. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that most living things need water, food and air, while nonliving things can continue to exist without any requirements.
SC-P-UD-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that plants and animals have features that help them live in different environments.
SC-P-UD-U-5. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that organisms may not be able to survive if some of their parts are missing.