Science Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Properties of matter and Energy

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Kentucky Standards

KY.CC. Core Content for Assessment v.4.1
SC-05-1.1. Structure and Transformation of Matter: In the elementary years of conceptual development, students will be studying properties of matter and physical changes of matter at the macro level through direct observations, forming the foundation for subsequent learning.
SC-05-1.1.1. Physical Science: Students will describe the physical properties of substances (e.g., boiling point, solubility, density).
SC-05-4.6. Energy Transformations: Energy transformations are inherent in almost every system in the universe - from tangible examples at the elementary level, such as heat production in simple earth and physical systems to more abstract ideas beginning at middle school, such as those transformations involved in the growth, dying and decay of living systems. The use of models to illustrate the often invisible and abstract notions of energy transfer will aid in conceptualization, especially as students move from the macroscopic level of observation and evidence (primarily elementary school) to the microscopic interactions at the atomic level (middle and high school levels).
SC-05-4.6.1. Unifying Concepts: Students will classify energy phenomena as kinetic or potential; describe the transfer of energy occurring in simple systems or related data.
SC-05-4.6.5. Unifying Concepts: Students should understand that heat energy moves in predictable ways, flowing from warmer objects to cooler ones, until both objects reach the same temperature. By examining cause and effect relationships, consequences of heat movement and conduction can be predicted and inferred.
KY.PS. Program of Studies 2006
SC-5-ET. Big Idea: Energy Transformations (Unifying Concepts) - Energy transformations are inherent in almost every system in the universe - from tangible examples at the elementary level, such as heat production in simple earth and physical systems to more abstract ideas beginning at middle school, such as those transformations involved in the growth, dying and decay of living systems. The use of models to illustrate the often invisible and abstract notions of energy transfer will aid in conceptualization, especially as students move from the macroscopic level of observation and evidence (primarily elementary school) to the microscopic interactions at the atomic level (middle and high school levels). (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6)
SC-5-ET-S-1. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will classify energy phenomena (e.g., heat/thermal energy, electrical energy, energy of position) as kinetic or potential and use observations and evidence to describe the transfer of energy occurring in simple systems
SC-5-ET-U-1. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that energy can have many different forms and be contained in many different substances. Evidence of energy transfer may be observed in a wide variety of systems.
SC-5-ET-U-5. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that in a closed system, warm objects will cool and cool objects will warm until they are all the same temperature.
SC-5-STM. Big Idea: Structure and Transformation of Matter (Physical Science) - A basic understanding of matter is essential to the conceptual development of other big ideas in science. In the elementary years of conceptual development, students will be studying properties of matter and physical changes of matter at the macro level through direct observations, forming the foundation for subsequent learning. The use of models (and an understanding of their scales and limitations) is an effective means of learning about the structure of matter. Looking for patterns in properties is also critical to comparing and explaining differences in matter. (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.4)
SC-5-STM-S-2. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will work individually and with others to design and conduct fair tests to safely investigate properties of matter, such as boiling point, density, and solubility