Science Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Roots, Stems and Leaves

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Kentucky Standards

KY.CC. Core Content for Assessment v.4.1
SC-05-3.4. Unity and Diversity: Elementary students begin to observe the macroscopic features of organisms in order to make comparisons and classifications based upon likenesses and differences. Looking for patterns in the appearance and behavior of an organism leads to the notion that offspring are much like the parents, but not exactly alike.
SC-05-3.4.1. Biological Science: Students will describe and compare living systems to understand the complementary nature of structure and function.
SC-05-4.6. Energy Transformations: Energy transformations are inherent in almost every system in the universe - from tangible examples at the elementary level, such as heat production in simple earth and physical systems to more abstract ideas beginning at middle school, such as those transformations involved in the growth, dying and decay of living systems. The use of models to illustrate the often invisible and abstract notions of energy transfer will aid in conceptualization, especially as students move from the macroscopic level of observation and evidence (primarily elementary school) to the microscopic interactions at the atomic level (middle and high school levels).
SC-05-4.6.4. Unifying Concepts: Students will identify predictable patterns and make generalizations about light and matter interactions using data/evidence.
KY.PS. Program of Studies 2006
SC-5-ET. Big Idea: Energy Transformations (Unifying Concepts) - Energy transformations are inherent in almost every system in the universe - from tangible examples at the elementary level, such as heat production in simple earth and physical systems to more abstract ideas beginning at middle school, such as those transformations involved in the growth, dying and decay of living systems. The use of models to illustrate the often invisible and abstract notions of energy transfer will aid in conceptualization, especially as students move from the macroscopic level of observation and evidence (primarily elementary school) to the microscopic interactions at the atomic level (middle and high school levels). (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6)
SC-5-ET-S-2. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will describe solar energy and how it impacts physical and biological systems on Earth
SC-5-UD. Big Idea: Unity and Diversity (Biological Science) - All matter is comprised of the same basic elements, goes through the same kinds of energy transformations, and uses the same kinds of forces to move. Living organisms are no exception. Elementary students begin to observe the macroscopic features of organisms in order to make comparisons and classifications based upon likenesses and differences. Looking for patterns in the appearance and behavior of an organism leads to the notion that offspring are much like the parents, but not exactly alike. Emphasis at every level should be placed upon the understanding that while every living thing is composed of similar small constituents that combine in predictable ways, it is the subtle variations within these small building blocks that account for both the likenesses and differences in form and function that create the diversity of life. (Academic Expectations 2.1, 2.2, 2.3)
SC-5-UD-S-1. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will use observations and models to describe and compare internal and external structures of plants and animals and their corresponding functions
SC-5-UD-U-1. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that animals and plants have a great variety of body plans and internal structures that contribute to their being able to meet their needs.
SC-5-UD-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that organisms are composed of a variety of sub-systems that have essential functions. Organisms function with a minimum of superfluous parts because their structures are precisely suited to their essential functions.