South Dakota Standards for Fifth Grade Science

Animal Diversity and Adaptations
FreeHere are some examples of the systems that animals and humans have in common: Integumentary system, Muscular system, Endocrine system, Nervous system, Circulatory system, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Excretory System, Reproductive system, Immune system, Skeletal System. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Cells, tissues and organs
FreeCells need ENERGY to do all this work. Cellular respiration is the process where cells turn food into usable energy. When similar cells group together and work together for the same purpose, they form tissues. For example, skin tissues protect our bodies from dirt and germs getting inside our bodies. Nerve tissue helps us feel things, such as if something is hot or cold. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 6
Earth's oceans
Oceans are a natural resource for salt and the fish and other sea animals we eat. Ocean Currents. Ocean Tides, Trenches, Mid-Ocean Ridges, Seamounts, The Flat Abyssal Plains, The Continental Shelf. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Plant Responses and Adaptations
A plant can respond to the conditions of its environment. A plant can change its position and grow in a certain direction or manner to meet its survival needs and adapt to a varying environment. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Plants with and without seeds
There are many plants in the world. Some are plants that you know of and many you have never heard of before! The Fern’s Life Cycle. The Life Cycle of Moss. Monocots vs. Dicots….what are these? Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Properties of matter and Energy
What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Kinetic energy is energy that is happening now; it is energy in motion. Potential energy is energy that is waiting to happen; it is stored energy. How does heat get transferred: By conduction, by convection and by radiation. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Science Worksheets: Acids and bases
An Acid is a type of sour substance. Examples of acids are lemon juice and vinegar. A base is a type of bitter substance. A base dissolved in water is called a basic solution. Examples of a base substance are soap and baking soda. Scientists use a variety of pH indicators to determine which substances are bases and which are acids. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Science Worksheets: Chemical and physical changes of matter
A chemical change is a change in which one kind of substance is changed into a different kind of substance. Chemical changes produce substances that were not there when you started. You can’t reverse or undo a chemical change. The substance or object involved in physical change is the same before and after the change (unlike a chemical change). The change is not permanent and can be undone. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
The 6-Kingdoms of life
Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Weather, Weather patterns and climate
How do clouds form? Main types of clouds. Precipitation. Air Pressure. What are the Four Most Influential Air Masses that Affect the Weather in North America? What is needed for a thunderstorm to occur? Thunderstorm key ingredients: Moisture, Instability and Uplift. What is a hurricane? What is a tornado? What is climate? Climate Zones: Polar zone, Temperate zone, Tropical zone. The location of the zone determines its climate. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5

SD.5.E. Earth/Space Science: Students will analyze the composition, formative processes, and history of the universe, solar system, and Earth.

5.E.1. Analyze the various structures and processes of the Earth system.

5.E.1.1. Students are able to describe the basic structure of Earth's interior.
Earth - Inside and Out
Let's look at the Earth from the inside out...
The Earth is made up three main layers called crust, mantle, and core. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :9
Plate tectonics
The Earth is a dynamic planet. Its interior is actually in motion! The crust on its surface is also in motion. It was not until the 20th century that geologists truly began to understand Earth's dynamic movements. New theories, supported by ever-improving technologies, have made it possible to more clearly understand the forces working within the planet we call home. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :7
Plate Tectonics
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How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
5.E.1.2. Explain the formation of geological features of the Earth through plate tectonics.
Volcanoes
The intense heat and pressures in the mantle turn solid rock into liquid magma. Magma comes out through the surface of the crust to form volcanoes. Three volcanoes categories are cinder cones, shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes. The ash and rock that is extruded by explosive volcanoes is called pyroclastic material. This volcanic mudflow is called a lahar. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
5.E.1.3. Describe how Earth's surface is constantly changing.
Earth - Inside and Out
Let's look at the Earth from the inside out...
The Earth is made up three main layers called crust, mantle, and core. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :9
Landforms, Rocks and soil
Landsforms are features that make up the Earth's surface. They include mountains, plateaus, canyons, deltas, hills, valleys, and more... The Rock cycle, Volcanoes. How do Earthquakes happen? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Minerals of Earth's crust
Minerals are solid elements formed naturally in the Earth’s surface. Every mineral has a unique chemical composition – a mix of the chemicals that formed it. Rocks are made up of minerals, sometimes more than one kind of mineral! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Rocks
There are three major groupings of rocks: igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary. Igneous rocks form when liquid rock cools and hardens. Sedimentary rocks: Clastic, Chemical, Biochemical or organic. Metamorphic rocks: foliated and non-foliated (or massive). Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Weathering of rocks and soil formation
Weathering is a collection of natural processes that, over time, break large rock into smaller and smaller pieces. Rocks can be broken down by physical processes (called mechanical weathering) and chemical processes (called chemical weathering). Soil is a combination of decomposed rock and organic materials. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Agents of Erosion and Deposition
FreeForces of weathering and erosion are constantly reshaping Earth's surface. Erosion includes the chemical and physical breakdown of rocks and their transport from their point of origin to another location. Blowing wind, running water, flowing ice and and gravity are the forces that erode rock and sculpt the landscape. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
5.E.1.4. Examine topographical maps.
Landforms, Rocks and soil
Landsforms are features that make up the Earth's surface. They include mountains, plateaus, canyons, deltas, hills, valleys, and more... The Rock cycle, Volcanoes. How do Earthquakes happen? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Maps as models of the earth/Contour models
Geologists use a variety of different types of maps to model or depict the three-dimensional Earth on a two-dimensional surface. Each type of map serves a purpose because each type has its special strengths: Topographic Maps, Mercator Projections, Conic Projections, Azimuthal Projections. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

5.E.2. Analyze essential principles and ideas about the composition and structure of the universe.

5.E.2.1. Students are able to describe the components (Sun, planets, and moons) of the solar system.
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
The solar system
All planets in our solar system rotate and they all revolve around the Sun. Inner planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth. Outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. Comets are made of ice and rock. They have four parts: a nucleus which is the solid portion of the comet and is made of dust and ice, a coma which is a cloud of dust and evaporated gases, an ion tail and a dust tail. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
The Sun-Earth-Moon System
The Earth is simultaneously spinning on its axis(rotation) and revolving around the sun. As viewed from space, the Earth rotates counter-clockwise. This is called prograde rotation. Planets that spin clockwise are said to have retrograde rotation. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Our Solar System
Solar systems begin in the dust and gas clouds found in between the stars. The dust is composed of elements like iron and carbon. The gas is hydrogen and helium. These dusty clouds are called nebulae. Here these particles start to come together to form planets. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Our Solar System
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Our Solar System
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5.E.2.2. Describe the relative scale of the Earth to the Sun, planets, and the Moon.
The solar system
All planets in our solar system rotate and they all revolve around the Sun. Inner planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth. Outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. Comets are made of ice and rock. They have four parts: a nucleus which is the solid portion of the comet and is made of dust and ice, a coma which is a cloud of dust and evaporated gases, an ion tail and a dust tail. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
The Sun-Earth-Moon System
The Earth is simultaneously spinning on its axis(rotation) and revolving around the sun. As viewed from space, the Earth rotates counter-clockwise. This is called prograde rotation. Planets that spin clockwise are said to have retrograde rotation. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Our Solar System
Solar systems begin in the dust and gas clouds found in between the stars. The dust is composed of elements like iron and carbon. The gas is hydrogen and helium. These dusty clouds are called nebulae. Here these particles start to come together to form planets. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Our Solar System
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Our Solar System
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5.E.2.3. Students are able to explain how the Earth's rotation affects the appearance of the sky.
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Earth's freshwater and atmosphere
Planet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
The Sun-Earth-Moon System
The Earth is simultaneously spinning on its axis(rotation) and revolving around the sun. As viewed from space, the Earth rotates counter-clockwise. This is called prograde rotation. Planets that spin clockwise are said to have retrograde rotation. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

SD.5.L. Life Science: Students will describe structures and attributes of living things, processes of life, and interaction with each other and the environment.

5.L.1. Understand the fundamental structures, functions, classifications, and mechanisms found in living things.

5.L.1.1. Students are able to describe the basic process of photosynthesis and the role of light as a source of energy in plants.
Plant Structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. A plant has different parts that are all important in keeping the plant alive and healthy: Roots, Stem, Leaves. A plant’s roots collect water and minerals from soil for the rest of the plant. The main job of a plant’s stem is to carry water and minerals from the roots to the rest of the plant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Roots, Stems and Leaves
Plants have two different root systems: a Taproot and a Fibrous Root system. Leaves of a plant are made of plant organs and tissues. The top layer of leaf, which protects the leaf, is called its epidermis. Leaves have tiny openings underneath them called the stomata which let air and water in and out of the leaf. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant Processes
Photosynthesis is a process powered by sunlight that uses carbon dioxide and water to produce oxygen and food. The process requires six molecules of water and six molecules of carbon dioxide. These molecules undergo chemical changes and oxygen and sugars like glucose are produced. The oxygen is let go through the stomata and the sugars are used to power cell functions. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Six Kingdoms of Life
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Pond Microlife
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What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4

5.L.2. Analyze various patterns and products of natural and induced biological change.

5.L.2.1. Students are able to predict physical characteristics with family lineage.
Genetics - Study of Heredity
Heredity is the passing on of traits from parents to their offspring, either through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction, the offspring cells or organisms acquire the genetic information of their parents. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :8
The Study of Heredity
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5.L.2.2. Students are able to describe structures and processes involved in plant reproduction.
Plant Structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. A plant has different parts that are all important in keeping the plant alive and healthy: Roots, Stem, Leaves. A plant’s roots collect water and minerals from soil for the rest of the plant. The main job of a plant’s stem is to carry water and minerals from the roots to the rest of the plant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Plant growth and reproduction
Process of Reproduction. Fertilization, Seeds. Lesson Checkpoints: What is one reason a plant has nectar? What do mosses and ferns produce instead of seeds? What is the female organ of a flower called? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Flowers and seeds
The flower is the seed factory of the plant – where the flower produces seeds. A flower’s sepals cover a developing flower bud in order to protect the bud while it grows. The petals of a flower are often bright and colorful. The stamen is the male part of a flower. The pistil of a flower includes the stigma, style, and ovary. The ovary of a flower contains seeds. The ovule is the part of the plant that becomes a fruit. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant reproduction
An angiosperm is a plant that produces seeds within a fruit. Reproduction begins when the pollen from the anther is in contact with the stigma. Eventually the egg will be fertilized in the ovule that is in the ovary and turn from a zygote to an embryo inside the seed. The life cycle of angiosperms among the different species is very similar: Pollination, fertilization, and the development of fruit. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

5.L.3. Analyze how organisms are linked to one another and the environment.

5.L.3.1. Students are able to describe how natural events and/or human influences may help or harm ecosystems.
Earth's Waters
Did you know that three quarters (3/4) of Earth is covered by water? Freshwater is water containing only a very little amount of salt. Oceans are made of salt water. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of the Earth’s water is saltwater. Throughout the water cycle, water can be solid, liquid, and a gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth's freshwater and atmosphere
Planet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Our impact on earth
Any waste substance that is added to a natural system in amounts greater than that natural system can break it down or eliminate it is called pollution. The waste substance itself is the pollutant. A natural resource that can be replenished is called a renewable resource. In most cases, water is a renewable resource. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth`s Climate
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
5.L.3.2. Students are able to analyze the roles of organisms to determine the transfer of energy using an energy pyramid model.
Energy and ecosystems
An ecosystem includes all the living and non-living things in an area. This includes populations and communities of many different animals. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Interactions among living things
An important and essential interaction among living things involves the flow of energy within an environment. All living organisms need energy to survive! Energy moves through an environment through food chains and food webs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Ecosystems, food chains and food webs
Understanding food chains and food webs requires understanding the flow of energy and food sources among living things on Earth. A food chain represents a series of organisms connected by where they obtain their energy. A food web is made up of many different food chains in an ecosystem. A food web helps us understand how organisms are interrelated within an ecosystem. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4
5.L.3.3. Students are able to describe how interrelationships enable some organisms to survive.
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Interactions among living things
An important and essential interaction among living things involves the flow of energy within an environment. All living organisms need energy to survive! Energy moves through an environment through food chains and food webs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Cycles of life and Biomes
The Nitrogen Cycle Process: Nitrogen is taken in by plants through their roots, animals eat plants, and the nitrogen is passed along the food chain to animals. Herbivores get nitrogen by eating plants. Carnivores get nitrogen by eating herbivores. Nitrogen is returned to the soil when an organism dies – decomposers break down the dead organisms and change the nitrogen compounds in the dead organism’s body into the kind plants can use. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
The Evolution and interaction of Living Things
Over 3.5 billion years ago, the Earth was much different than it is today. Scientists believe that early Earth’s atmosphere was made up of nitrogen, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. All of these gases are still on Earth today, but in different quantities. The gases in Earth's atmosphere include: Nitrogen - 78 percent, Oxygen - 21 percent, Argon - 0.93 percent, Carbon dioxide - 0.04 percent, Trace amounts of neon, helium, methane, krypton and hydrogen, as well as water vapor. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

SD.5.N. Nature of Science: Students will explore, evaluate, and communicate personal and scientific investigations to understand the nature of science.

5.N.1. Understand the nature and origin of scientific knowledge.

5.N.1.2. Describe science as a body of knowledge and an investigative process.
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Introduction to earth science
The field of Geology includes a number of specialized disciplines including: Mineralogy - the study of minerals, Paleontology - the study of fossils, Petrology - the study of rocks, Geophysics - the study of the physics of the Earth and its atmosphere, Meteorology - the study of weather and weather prediction, Seismology - the study of earthquakes, and Volcanology - the study of volcanoes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
5.N.1.3. Describe how scientific knowledge increases and changes over time.
Science in our world
Have you ever seen a meteor shower? Meteors are small fragments of debris from space that enter the Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speed. They then turn into a vapor r leaving a streak of light that disappears quickly. You hear on the radio that a high air pressure system will be moving in tomorrow, which means there is a very good chance of clear skies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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5.N.2. Apply the skills necessary to conduct scientific investigations.

5.N.2.1. Use investigations in science to accumulate knowledge.
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
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Moving and Controlling the Body
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Providing Fuel and Transportation
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Cell Transport
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Work, Power & Simple Machines
. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Pond Microlife
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The Study of Heredity
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Earth`s Climate
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Light and Optics
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Elements and the periodic table
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2

SD.5.P. Physical Science: Students will use appropriate scientific models to describe and quantify the nature and interactions of matter and energy.

5.P.1. Describe structures and properties of, and changes in, matter.

5.P.1.1. Students are able to define matter on the basis of observable physical properties.
Rocks and minerals
FreeWhat is in a Rock? Rocks are made up of many tiny pieces of minerals. What are Minerals? Minerals are natural, nonliving crystals. They come in many sizes, shapes, and colors. Types of Rocks: Sedimentary Rocks, Igneous Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks. The Rock Cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Science worksheets: Solids, liquids and gases.
Solid, liquid, and gas are all states of matter. The molecules in solids are tightly packed together. The molecules in liquids are not as close as those in solids; they have a little more room to move around. The molecules in gases are far apart. Gases can fill any size room or any size container. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Introduction to matter
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Elements and the periodic table
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Elements and the periodic table
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5.P.1.2. Explain differences and similarities between a solution and other mixtures and changes that occur within.
Matter
Matter is ALL Around Us! Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Matter is made up of atoms. Atoms are the basic building blocks of matter and make up all objects. Matter change states from solid, liquid, or gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Elements, mixtures and compounds
Elements are a basic (simple) kind of matter. They can’t be broken down into simpler parts and still keep their properties because they are in the simplest form. A solute is the substance that is dissolved in the solvent. Solubility refers to the ability of one substance to dissolve into another substance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Mixtures, solutions and compounds
Mixtures, unlike compounds, are the physical combination of different substances. Solutions are a type of mixture with at least one solute and solvent. In a solution, finely dissolved particles of a solute are dissolved by the solvent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

5.P.2. Analyze forces, their forms, and their effects on motions.

5.P.2.1. Students are able to identify forces in specific situations that require objects to interact, change directions,
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Newton's Laws of motion
What is motion? Motion is the process of an object changing its place or its position. Motion is not speed. Speed is the rate an object changes position. Newton's law of motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Motion
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Forces
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All About Energy
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5.P.2.2. Students are able to analyze the structure and design of simple and compound machines to determine how the machines make work easier by trading force for distance.
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Newton's Laws of motion
What is motion? Motion is the process of an object changing its place or its position. Motion is not speed. Speed is the rate an object changes position. Newton's law of motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Work and machines
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Energy and energy resources
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Work, Power & Simple Machines
. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
All About Energy
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5.P.3. Analyze interactions of energy and matter.

5.P.3.2. Students are able to describe the Sun's ability to produce energy in the forms of light and heat.
Energy resources
A renewable resource is a resource that can be naturally restored or at least replenished as it is needed: The power of WIND, the power of WATER, the power of the SUN, Geothermal energy (heat from the earth), the Energy of TRASH. Fossil fuels - Crude Oil, Coal, Natural Gas - are nonrenewable resources. These types of resources take much longer to replace than most societies can wait. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Earth's energy resources
Renewable resources are resources that can be replenished in a reasonable amount of time. Nonrenewable resources are resources that, once consumed, cannot be replaced. Because oil, natural gas, and coal are the products of plants and organisms, they are known as fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are ultimately a limited resource, it is important to develop and use renewable energy resources. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Understanding Weather
The global winds in the Northern hemisphere curve to the right. The global winds in the Southern hemisphere curve to the left. One would expect them to travel in a straight line, but the Earth’s rotation on its axis causes them to curve. This is due to the Coriolis effect. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Energy and energy resources
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4
5.P.3.3. Students are able to describe basic properties of light.
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Light and Sound
Light is a form of energy that travels in waves. A reflection occurs when light rays bounce off a surface, such as when you see your reflection in a mirror. Absorption is when an object takes in light wave. Refraction is when light bends moving from one medium to another. Sound is a type of energy that travels in waves that is caused by vibrations. Vibrations are movements made rapidly back and forth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Sound and light energy
Sound is a type of energy that travels in waves which are caused by vibrations. Characteristics of Sound. Vibrations: movements made rapidly back and forth. Sound Waves: an invisible transfer of sound energy as it travels away from the energy source. Wavelength: the distance between a point on one sound wave and a similar point on another sound wave. Frequency: The number of vibrations in a period of time is called the frequency of a vibration. Volume: The loudness or quietness of a sound is its volume. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Light
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Light and Optics
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4

SD.5.S. Science, Technology, Environment, and Society: Students will identify and evaluate the relationships and ethical implications of science upon technology, environment, and society.

5.S.1. Analyze various implications/effects of scientific advancement within the environment and society.

5.S.1.1. Students are able to identify scientific changes that have affected transportation, health, sanitation, and communication.
Science in our world
Have you ever seen a meteor shower? Meteors are small fragments of debris from space that enter the Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speed. They then turn into a vapor r leaving a streak of light that disappears quickly. You hear on the radio that a high air pressure system will be moving in tomorrow, which means there is a very good chance of clear skies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Technology in our world
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Atoms and Chemical Bonding
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2

5.S.2. Analyze the relationships/interactions among science, technology, environment, and society.

5.S.2.1. Students are able to explain the interrelationship of populations, resources, and environments.
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Earth`s Climate
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4