Science Worksheets and Study Guides Seventh Grade. Sound

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Washington Standards

WA.2. Inquiry (INQ)
6-8.INQ. Questioning and Investigating: In prior grades students learned to plan investigations to match a given research question. In grades 6-8 students learn to revise questions so they can be answered scientifically and then to design an appropriate investigation to answer the question and carry out the study. Students learn to think critically and logically to make connections between prior science knowledge and evidence produced from their investigations. Students can work well in collaborative teams and communicate the procedures and results of their investigations, and are expected to critique their own findings as well as the findings of others.
6-8.INQC. Investigate: Students know that collecting, analyzing, and displaying data are essential aspects of all investigations.
6-8.INQC.1. Students are expected to communicate results using pictures, tables, charts, diagrams, graphic displays, and text that are clear, accurate, and informative.
6-8.INQF. Explain: Students know that it is important to distinguish between the results of a particular investigation and general conclusions drawn from these results.
6-8.INQF.1. Students are expected to generate a scientific conclusion from an investigation using inferential logic, and clearly distinguish between results (e.g., evidence) and conclusions (e.g., explanation).
6-8.INQF.2. Students are expected to describe the differences between an objective summary of the findings and an inference made from the findings.
WA.4. Physical Science
PS3. Energy: Transfer, Transformation, and Conservation
6-8.PS3. Interactions of Energy and Matter: In prior grades students learned how heat, light, sound, and electrical energy are generated and can be transferred from place to place. In grades 6-8 students learn how energy and matter interact in various settings. Heat (thermal energy) always moves from a warmer to a cooler place through solids (by conduction) and through liquids and gases (mostly by convection or mechanical mixing). Light energy interacts with matter and with our eyes and allows us to see things. Electrical energy provides a convenient way to transfer energy to where and when the energy is needed. Sound is yet another form of energy produced by a vibrating object. These fundamental concepts of how matter and energy interact have broad application in all of the other sciences.
6-8.PS3F. Students know that energy can be transferred from one place to another through waves. Waves include vibrations in materials. Sound and earthquake waves are examples. These and other waves move at different speeds in different materials.
6-8.PS3F.1. Students are expected to contrast a light wave with a sound wave by identifying that both have characteristic wavelengths, but light waves can travel through a vacuum while sound waves cannot.
6-8.PS3F.2. Students are expected to explain that sound is caused by a vibrating object.

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