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Circulation and immunity Eighth Grade Science
Climate Seventh Grade Science
Earthquakes Eighth Grade Science
Earthquakes Seventh Grade Science
The Sun-Earth-Moon System Seventh Grade Science
Bones, muscles, and skin Eighth Grade Science

Florida Standards (NGSSS) for Eighth Grade Science

FL.LACC.RST.68. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Craft and Structure

LACC.68.RST.2.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6-8 texts and topics.
The Digestive and nutritionWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :4Ecosystems, food chains and food websWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :5Chemical bondingFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :1Chemical reactionsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabularies :1Ecology IWorksheets :4Vocabularies :2Ecology IIWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical Formulas and BondingWorksheets :3Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Measurements and CalculationsWorksheets :3Protection, Reproduction and CooperationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Moving and Controlling the BodyWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Providing Fuel and TransportationWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Food Chains and Food WebsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Six Kingdoms of LifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Plate TectonicsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Cell TransportWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Work, Power & Simple MachinesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2EarthquakesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Pond MicrolifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Chromosomes, Genes and DNAWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MitosisWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2The Study of HeredityWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Our Solar SystemWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Earth`s SurfaceWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Properties and States of MatterWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Earth`s ClimateWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Photosynthesis and RespirationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2RocksWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2VolcanoesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MeiosisWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Forces and MotionWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Energy: Forms and ChangesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3SoundWorksheets :3Vocabularies :4Light and OpticsWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Elements and the periodic tableWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Atoms and Chemical BondingWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

LACC.68.RST.3.7. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
LACC.68.RST.3.9. Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.

FL.LACC.WHST.68. Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Production and Distribution of Writing

LACC.68.WHST.2.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

LACC.68.WHST.3.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

Text Types and Purposes

LACC.68.WHST.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
LACC.68.WHST.1.2.a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
LACC.68.WHST.1.2.f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

FL.SC.8.E. Earth and Space Science

SC.8.E.5. Earth in Space and Time - The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the formation of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, and Earth. Humankind's need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.

SC.8.E.5.1. Recognize that there are enormous distances between objects in space and apply our knowledge of light and space travel to understand this distance.
SC.8.E.5.10. Assess how technology is essential to science for such purposes as access to outer space and other remote locations, sample collection, measurement, data collection and storage, computation, and communication of information.
SC.8.E.5.11. Identify and compare characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum such as wavelength, frequency, use, and hazards and recognize its application to an understanding of planetary images and satellite photographs.
SC.8.E.5.12. Summarize the effects of space exploration on the economy and culture of Florida.
SC.8.E.5.2. Recognize that the universe contains many billions of galaxies and that each galaxy contains many billions of stars.
SC.8.E.5.3. Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
SC.8.E.5.4. Explore the Law of Universal Gravitation by explaining the role that gravity plays in the formation of planets, stars, and solar systems and in determining their motions.
SC.8.E.5.5. Describe and classify specific physical properties of stars: apparent magnitude (brightness), temperature (color), size, and luminosity (absolute brightness).
SC.8.E.5.6. Create models of solar properties including: rotation, structure of the Sun, convection, sunspots, solar flares, and prominences.
SC.8.E.5.7. Compare and contrast the properties of objects in the Solar System including the Sun, planets, and moons to those of Earth, such as gravitational force, distance from the Sun, speed, movement, temperature, and atmospheric conditions.
SC.8.E.5.8. Compare various historical models of the Solar System, including geocentric and heliocentric.
SC.8.E.5.9. Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including: 1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction 2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of each body.

FL.SC.8.L. Life Science

SC.8.L.18. Matter and Energy Transformations - A. Living things all share basic needs for life. B. Living organisms acquire the energy they need for life processes through various metabolic pathways (photosynthesis and cellular respiration). C. Matter and energy are recycled through cycles such as the carbon cycle.

SC.8.L.18.1. Describe and investigate the process of photosynthesis, such as the roles of light, carbon dioxide, water and chlorophyll; production of food; release of oxygen.
SC.8.L.18.2. Describe and investigate how cellular respiration breaks down food to provide energy and releases carbon dioxide.
SC.8.L.18.3. Construct a scientific model of the carbon cycle to show how matter and energy are continuously transferred within and between organisms and their physical environment.
SC.8.L.18.4. Cite evidence that living systems follow the Laws of Conservation of Mass and Energy.

FL.SC.8.N. Nature of Science

SC.8.N.1. The Practice of Science - A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of ''the scientific method.'' C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge. D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

SC.8.N.1.3. Use phrases such as ''results support'' or ''fail to support'' in science, understanding that science does not offer conclusive 'proof' of a knowledge claim.
SC.8.N.1.4. Explain how hypotheses are valuable if they lead to further investigations, even if they turn out not to be supported by the data.
SC.8.N.1.5. Analyze the methods used to develop a scientific explanation as seen in different fields of science.
SC.8.N.1.6. Understand that scientific investigations involve the collection of relevant empirical evidence, the use of logical reasoning, and the application of imagination in devising hypotheses, predictions, explanations and models to make sense of the collected evidence.

SC.8.N.2. The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge - A: Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion. B: Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change. C: Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

SC.8.N.2.1. Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific ideas.
SC.8.N.2.2. Discuss what characterizes science and its methods.

SC.8.N.3. The Role of Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, and Models - The terms that describe examples of scientific knowledge, for example; ''theory,'' ''law,'' ''hypothesis,'' and ''model'' have very specific meanings and functions within science.

SC.8.N.3.1. Select models useful in relating the results of their own investigations.

FL.SC.8.P. Physical Science

SC.8.P.8. Properties of Matter - A. All objects and substances in the world are made of matter. Matter has two fundamental properties: matter takes up space and matter has mass which gives it inertia. B. Objects and substances can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Mass is the amount of matter (or ''stuff'') in an object. Weight, on the other hand, is the measure of force of attraction (gravitational force) between an object and Earth. The concepts of mass and weight are complicated and potentially confusing to elementary students. Hence, the more familiar term of ''weight'' is recommended for use to stand for both mass and weight in grades K-5. By grades 6-8, students are expected to understand the distinction between mass and weight, and use them appropriately.

SC.8.P.8.1. Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.
SC.8.P.8.2. Differentiate between weight and mass recognizing that weight is the amount of gravitational pull on an object and is distinct from, though proportional to, mass.
SC.8.P.8.4. Classify and compare substances on the basis of characteristic physical properties that can be demonstrated or measured; for example, density, thermal or electrical conductivity, solubility, magnetic properties, melting and boiling points, and know that these properties are independent of the amount of the sample.
SC.8.P.8.5. Recognize that there are a finite number of elements and that their atoms combine in a multitude of ways to produce compounds that make up all of the living and nonliving things that we encounter.
SC.8.P.8.6. Recognize that elements are grouped in the periodic table according to similarities of their properties.
SC.8.P.8.7. Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by recognizing that atoms are the smallest unit of an element and are composed of sub-atomic particles (electrons surrounding a nucleus containing protons and neutrons).
SC.8.P.8.8. Identify basic examples of and compare and classify the properties of compounds, including acids, bases, and salts.
SC.8.P.8.9. Distinguish among mixtures (including solutions) and pure substances.

SC.8.P.9. Changes in Matter - A. Matter can undergo a variety of changes. B. When matter is changed physically, generally no changes occur in the structure of the atoms or molecules composing the matter. C. When matter changes chemically, a rearrangement of bonds between the atoms occurs. This results in new substances with new properties.

SC.8.P.9.2. Differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes.
SC.8.P.9.3. Investigate and describe how temperature influences chemical changes.

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