Social Studies Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Colonial Period

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Kentucky Standards

KY.AE. Academic Expectation
AE.1. Students are able to use basic communication and mathematics skills for purposes and situations they will encounter throughout their lives.
1.2. Students make sense of the variety of materials they read.
AE.2. Students shall develop their abilities to apply core concepts and principles from mathematics, the sciences, the arts, the humanities, social studies, practical living studies, and vocational studies to what they will encounter throughout their lives.
2.2. Social Studies: Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical perspective.
KY.CC. Core Content for Assessment v.4.1.
SS-05-2. Cultures and Societies: Culture is the way of life shared by a group of people, including their ideas and traditions. Cultures reflect the values and beliefs of groups in different ways (e.g., art, music, literature, religion); however, there are universals (e.g., food, clothing, shelter, communication) connecting all cultures. Culture influences viewpoints, rules and institutions in a global society. Students should understand that people form cultural groups throughout the United States and the World, and that issues and challenges unite and divide them.
SS-05-2.1. Elements of Culture
SS-05-2.1.1. Students will identify early cultures (e.g., English, Spanish, French, West African) in the United States and analyze their similarities and differences. DOK 2
SS-05-2.3. Interactions Among Individuals and Groups
SS-05-2.3.1. Students will describe various forms of interactions (compromise, cooperation, conflict) that occurred between diverse groups (e.g., Native Americans, European Explorers, English colonists, British Parliament) in the history of the United States. DOK 2
SS-05-3. Economics: Economics includes the study of production, distribution and consumption of goods and services. Students need to understand how their economic decisions affect them, others, the nation and the world. The purpose of economic education is to enable individuals to function effectively both in their own personal lives and as citizens and participants in an increasingly connected world economy. Students need to understand the benefits and costs of economic interaction and interdependence among people, societies and governments.
SS-05-3.4. Production, Distribution, and Consumption
SS-05-3.4.1. Students will describe production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in the history of the U.S. (Colonization, Industrialization, Twentieth Century to Present). DOK 3
SS-05-4. Geography: Geography includes the study of the five fundamental themes of location, place, regions, movement and human/environmental interaction. Students need geographic knowledge to analyze issues and problems to better understand how humans have interacted with their environment over time, how geography has impacted settlement and population, and how geographic factors influence climate, culture, the economy and world events. A geographic perspective also enables students to better understand the past and present and to prepare for the future.
SS-05-4.4. Human-Environment Interaction
SS-05-4.4.1. Students will explain and give examples of how people adapted to/modified the physical environment (e.g., natural resources, physical geography, natural disasters) to meet their needs during the history of the U.S. (Colonization, Expansion) and analyze the impact on their environment. DOK 3
SS-05-5. Historical Perspective: History is an account of events, people, ideas and their interaction over time that can be interpreted through multiple perspectives. In order for students to understand the present and plan for the future, they must understand the past. Studying history engages students in the lives, aspirations, struggles, accomplishments and failures of real people. Students need to think in an historical context in order to understand significant ideas, beliefs, themes, patterns and events, and how individuals and societies have changed over time in Kentucky, the United States and the World.
SS-05-5.1. The Factual and Interpretive Nature of History
SS-05-5.1.1. Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., artifacts, diaries, maps, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of the U.S. and interpret different perspectives. DOK 3
SS-05-5.2. The History of the United States
SS-05-5.2.1. Students will identify historical documents, selected readings and speeches (e.g., Mayflower Compact, Emancipation Proclamation, Dr. Martin Luther King's speech: I Have a Dream) and explain their historical significance. DOK 3
SS-05-5.2.2. Students will explain reasons (e.g., freedoms, opportunities, fleeing negative situations) immigrants came to America long ago (Colonization, Settlement, Industrialization and Immigration, Twentieth Century to Present) and compare with why immigrants come to America today. DOK 2
SS-05-5.2.4. Students will describe significant historical events in each of the broad historical periods and eras in U.S. history (Colonization, Settlement, Revolution and a New Nation, Expansion and Conflict, Industrialization and Immigration, Twentieth Century to Present) and explain cause and effect relationships. DOK 3
KY.PS. Program of Studies 2006
SS-5-CS. Big Idea: Cultures and Societies - Culture is the way of life shared by a group of people, including their ideas and traditions. Cultures reflect the values and beliefs of groups in different ways (e.g., art, music, literature, religion); however, there are universals connecting all cultures. Culture influences viewpoints, rules, and institutions in a global society. Students should understand that people form cultural groups throughout the United States and the World, and that issues and challenges unite and divide them. (Academic Expectations 2.16, 2.17)
SS-5-CS-S-1. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will demonstrate an understanding of culture and cultural elements (e.g., beliefs, traditions, languages, skills, literature, the arts) of diverse groups:
SS-5-CS-S-1.a) Investigate cultural similarities and differences of diverse groups (e.g., English, French, Spanish and Dutch Colonists, West Africans, Immigrants of the 1800's) during the early development of the United States
SS-5-CS-S-3. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will describe conflicts that occurred among and between diverse groups (e.g., Native Americans and the early Explorers, Native Americans and the Colonists, the British Government and the English Colonists, Native Americans and the U.S. Government) during the settlement of the United States; explain the causes of these conflicts and the outcomes
SS-5-GC. Big Idea: Government and Civics - The study of government and civics allows students to understand the nature of government and the unique characteristics of American democracy, including its fundamental principles, structure, and the role of citizens. Understanding the historical development of structures of power, authority and governance and their evolving functions in contemporary U.S. society and other parts of the world is essential for developing civic competence. An understanding of civic ideals and practices of citizenship is critical to full participation in society and is a central purpose of the social studies. (Academic Expectations 2.14, 2.15)
SS-5-GC-U-1. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that the government of the United States was developed from a colonial base of representative democracy by people who envisioned an independent country and new purposes for the government.
SS-5-GC-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that the United States Government was formed to establish order, provide security and accomplish common goals.
SS-5-HP. Big Idea: Historical Perspective - History is an account of events, people, ideas, and their interaction over time that can be interpreted through multiple perspectives. In order for students to understand the present and plan for the future, they must understand the past. Studying history engages students in the lives, aspirations, struggles, accomplishments, and failures of real people. Students need to think in an historical context in order to understand significant ideas, beliefs, themes, patterns and events, and how individuals and societies have changed over time in Kentucky, the United States, and the World. (Academic Expectations 2.20)
SS-5-HP-S-1. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interpretative nature of history using a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources):
SS-5-HP-S-1.a) Investigate and chronologically describe major events in United States history (e.g., using timelines, charts, fictional and report writing, role playing)
SS-5-HP-S-1.b) Explain and draw inferences about the importance of major events in United States history
SS-5-HP-S-1.c) Examine cause and effect relationships in the history of the United States; identify examples of multiple causes of major historical events
SS-5-HP-S-1.d) Explain reasons that individuals and groups explored and settled in the United States
SS-5-HP-S-2. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will use information from print and non-print sources (e.g., documents, informational passages/texts, interviews, digital and environmental):
SS-5-HP-S-2.a) Examine factual and fictional accounts of significant historical events and people in United States history
SS-5-HP-S-2.d) Compare reasons (e.g., freedoms, opportunities, fleeing negative situations) immigrants came/come to America
SS-5-HP-S-3. Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - Students will investigate patterns across in U.S. history (e.g., major events/conflicts/culture; compare with major events/conflicts/culture to the present)
SS-5-HP-U-1. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that history is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. A variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources) are needed to understand and analyze historical events.
SS-5-HP-U-2. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that the history of the United States can be analyzed by examining significant eras (Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and a New Nation, Expansion and Conflict, Industrialization and Immigration and the Twentieth Century) to develop a chronological understanding and recognize cause and effect relationships and multiple causation, tying past to present.
SS-5-HP-U-3. Program of Studies: Understandings - Students will understand that the history of the United States has been impacted by Significant individuals, groups and advances In technology.