Social Studies Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Industrialization/Economics

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

New York Standards

NY.1. History of the United States and New York: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
1.3. Study about the major social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in New York State and United States history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.
1.3.2. Students classify information by type of activity: social, political, economic, technological, scientific, cultural, or religious.
1.4. The skills of historical analysis include the ability to: explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the concept of multiple causation; understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.
1.4.1. Students consider different interpretations of key events and/or issues in history and understand the differences in these accounts.
1.4.3. Students view historic events through the eyes of those who were there, as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts.
NY.2. World History: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.
2.1. The study of world history requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. This study also examines the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives.
2.1.1. Students read historical narratives, myths, legends, biographies, and autobiographies to learn about how historical figures lived, their motivations, hopes, fears, strengths, and weaknesses.
NY.4. Economics: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.
4.1. The study of economics requires an understanding of major economic concepts and systems, the principles of economic decision making, and the interdependence of economies and economic systems throughout the world.
4.1.1. Students know some ways individuals and groups attempt to satisfy their basic needs and wants by utilizing scarce resources.
4.1.2. Students explain how people's wants exceed their limited resources and that this condition defines scarcity.
4.1.3. Students know that scarcity requires individuals to make choices and that these choices involve costs.