Science Worksheets and Study Guides Seventh Grade. The Sun-Earth-Moon System

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Missouri Standards

MO.6. Composition and Structure of the Universe and the Motion of the Objects Within It
6.1. The universe has observable properties and structure
6.1.A. The Earth, Sun, and Moon are part of a larger system that includes other planets and smaller celestial
6.1.A.a. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Classify celestial bodies in the solar system into categories: Sun, Moon, planets, and other small bodies (i.e., asteroids, comets, meteors), based on physical properties
6.1.A.c. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe the relative proximity of common celestial bodies (i.e., Sun, Moon, planets, smaller celestial bodies such as comets and meteors, other stars) in the sky to the Earth
6.2. Regular and predictable motions of objects in the universe can be described and explained as the result of gravitational forces
6.2.A. The apparent position of the Sun and other stars, as seen from Earth, change in observable patterns
6.2.A.a. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Relate the apparent east-to-west changes in the positions of the Sun, other stars, and planets in the sky over the course of a day to Earth's counterclockwise rotation about its axis
6.2.A.b. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe the pattern that can be observed in the changes in number of hours of visible sunlight, and the time and location of sunrise and sunset, throughout the year
6.2.A.c. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how, in the Northern Hemisphere, the Sun appears lower in the sky during the winter and higher in the sky during the summer
6.2.A.d. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how, in winter, the Sun appears to rise in the Southeast and set in the Southwest, accounting for a relatively short day length, and, in summer, the Sun appears to rise in the Northeast and set in the Northwest, accounting for a relatively long day length
6.2.A.e. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how the Sun is never directly overhead when observed from North America
6.2.B. The apparent position of the moon, as seen from Earth, and its actual position relative to Earth change in observable patterns
6.2.B.a. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Observe the change in time and location of Moon rise, Moon set, and the Moon's appearance relative to time of day and month over several months, and note the pattern in this change
6.2.B.b. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how the Moon rises later each day due to its revolution around the Earth in a counterclockwise direction
6.2.B.c. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how the Moon is in the sky for roughly 12 hours in a 24-hour period (i.e., if the Moon rises at about 6 P.M., it will set at about 6 A.M.)
6.2.B.d. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how that one half of the Moon is always facing the Sun and, therefore, one half of the Moon is always lit
6.2.B.e. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Relate the apparent change in the Moon's position in the sky as it appears to move east-to-west over the course of a day to Earth's counterclockwise rotation about its axis
6.2.B.f. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how the appearance of the Moon that can be seen from Earth changes approximately every 28 days in an observable pattern (moon phases)
6.2.C. The regular and predictable motions of the Earth and Moon relative to the Sun explain natural phenomena on Earth, such as day, month, year, shadows, moon phases, eclipses, tides, and seasons
6.2.C.a. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Illustrate and explain a day as the time it takes a planet to make a full rotation about its axis
6.2.C.b. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Diagram the path (orbital ellipse) the Earth travels as it revolves around the Sun
6.2.C.c. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Illustrate and explain a year as the time it takes a planet to revolve around the Sun
6.2.C.e. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Recognize and explain the phases of the moon are due to the relative positions of the Moon with respect to the Earth and Sun
6.2.C.f. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Relate the axial tilt and orbital position of the Earth as it revolves around the Sun to the intensity of sunlight falling on different parts of the Earth during different seasons
6.2.D. Gravity is a force of attraction between objects in the solar system that governs their motion
6.2.D.b. Scope and Sequence - Objects and Their Motion in the Solar System: Describe how the planets' gravitational pull keeps satellites and moons in orbit around them