Alaska Standards for Third Grade Science

Animals and their needs
All animals need certain things in order to survive. Animals need water, food, movement, protection, shelter, reproduction, and oxygen to survive, and they have many different body parts to get these things they need. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Did you Know... 3rd grade
There are so many amazing scientific facts out there, waiting to be discovered by you! Check out some of the incredible ‘Did You Know? facts that have to do with many of the science topics you learn about in 3rd Grade. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Energy
Energy is the ability to do work. There are two types of energy. One type of energy is energy that is waiting to happen but has not happened yet. This is called potential energy. Another type of energy is called kinetic energy. This type of energy is energy that is happening now. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Grouping of Plants
Plants are often put into groups by the type of parts or structures they have. They can be grouped according to their types of leaves, stems, flowers, roots, and even seeds. Many plants have leaves that look similar while others have totally different kinds of leaves. Plant and tree leaves may be different in size, shape, and color. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Math in Science
Numbers, measuring, making graphs, calculating, adding, subtracting, and more…there is a lot of Math involved in Science. Whether you are studying plants, animals, or the solar system, you will use Math procedures during your investigations and data recording. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Natural resources
Natural resources are found on the Earth and are important to living things. Some natural resources come from below the Earth’s surface. Some natural resources are nonrenewable, which means that can not be replaced. Some natural resources are renewable. Three examples of natural resources we have in abundance on Earth are: sunlight, air, and water. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Rocks, Minerals, and soil
Rocks are solid material found in nature made up of minerals. A mineral is a natural material usually found in the ground. A rock has physical properties like color and composition, or what exact minerals make up the rock. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Science in our world - 3rd gr.
Everywhere we look, there are signs of SCIENCE! Science is all around us: Sounds We Hear, Energy We See and Feel, Work and Machines We Use and See, Forces, Motion, and How Things Move Around Us (gravity), Changes in Matter We See, Weather We See Outside, Water that We Use, Natural Resources We Use and Need to Conserve Everyday (recycling). Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Sound
Sound is energy that travels in a wave that is caused by vibrations. Vibrations are movements made rapidly back and forth. Vibrations travel through the air and into your ear. You hear sounds when vibrating air causes your eardrum to vibrate. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
The solar system
The Sun is a gigantic star that is made up of hot gases called plasma. The solar system includes the Sun, planets, the moons of each planet, as well as other objects that revolve around the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Where plants and animals live
An environment is everything that surrounds a living thing or person. Everything that lives on Earth lives in a certain environment. Living things get everything they need to survive from their environment. An environment also includes nonliving things. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Work and machines
Work is when you use force upon an object causing the object to move. The amount of work you do has to do with how much force you need to use. Simple machines make doing work easier but they never decrease the amount of work that needs to be done. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1

AK.A1. Science as Inquiry and Process (SA1, SA2, SA3)

[3] SA1.1. The student develops an understanding of the processes of science by asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, inferring and communicating.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Math in Science
Whether you are measuring, calculating, creating graphs and charts, or using numbers in any way… that’s using your math skills. During many science investigations you may have to measure the length, width, height, or weight of different objects. You also may need to measure the temperature of the air or different liquids when completing a scientific investigation as well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

[3] SA1.2. The student develops an understanding of the processes of science by observing and describing their world to answer simple questions.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

[3] SA2.1. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the attitudes and approaches to scientific inquiry by answering, 'how do you know?' questions with reasonable answers.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

[3] SA3.1. The student demonstrates an understanding that interactions with the environment provide an opportunity for understanding scientific concepts by observing local conditions that determine which plants and/or animals survive. (L)

Introduction to animals
Animals have particular body parts and structures to help them survive in their Earth environment. For instance, animals have certain body parts such as legs or wings that help them move, and mouths or trunks or beaks that help them drink water. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

AK.B1. Concepts of Physical Science (SB1, SB2, SB3, SB4)

[3] SB1.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of the structure and properties of matter by classifying matter according to physical properties (i.e., color, size, shape, weight, texture, flexibility).

Matter and its properties
Everything around us is made out matter. Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. All matter is made up of many different kinds of particles that are combined together in different ways. A property of matter is a feature, trait, or characteristic. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Rocks and minerals
FreeWhat is in a Rock? Rocks are made up of many tiny pieces of minerals. What are Minerals? Minerals are natural, nonliving crystals. They come in many sizes, shapes, and colors. Types of Rocks: Sedimentary Rocks, Igneous Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks. The Rock Cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

[3] SB3.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of the interactions between matter and energy and the effects of these interactions on systems by recognizing that temperature changes cause changes in phases of substances (e.g., ice changing to liquid, water changing to water vapor, and vice versa).

Comparing matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Mass is the amount of matter in an object. It is how much stuff an object is made of. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

[3] SB4.2. The student demonstrates an understanding of motions, forces, their characteristics, relationships, and effects by recognizing that objects can be moved without being touched (e.g., using magnets, falling objects, static electricity).

Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4

AK.C1. Concepts of Life Science (SC1, SC2, SC3)

[3] SC1.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of how science explains changes in life forms over time, including genetics, heredity, the process of natural selection and biological evolution by sorting Alaskan plants and/or animals using physical characteristics (e.g., leaves, beaks) (L)

Grouping of Animals
Animals can be classified, or grouped together, by the things they have in common, such as how they act, where they live, or how they look. Scientists separate animals into two main groups related to whether the animal has a backbone in its body or not. Those animals with backbones are part of the vertebrates group. Those animals without a central backbone are invertebrates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Classifying organisms
Scientific classification is the process of grouping living organisms into certain categories based on their characteristics, traits, and appearance. The order of scientific classification is kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. Each time we move to a different classification category, the groups get smaller and more specific. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

[3] SC1.2. The student demonstrates an understanding of how science explains changes in life forms over time, including genetics, heredity, the process of natural selection and biological evolution by describing how some traits (e.g. claws, teeth, camouflage) of living organisms have helped them survive as a species.

How animals grow and change and live
Animals have certain traits which help them survive in their environment. These survival traits are called adaptations. Many adaptations are inherited, which means they are passed on from the parents of animal. Many animals have adaptations for eating such as the way a bird’s beak is shaped. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth yesterday and today
Life on Earth Has Changed. Many kinds of animals that used to live on Earth are no longer living. They are extinct. Reasons for Extinction: Big changes in the climate. Many times animals could not handle these big changes in the weather. Good news: Many animals have adapted to many changes that happen on Earth so that they CAN survive and NOT become extinct! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Introduction to animals
Animals have particular body parts and structures to help them survive in their Earth environment. For instance, animals have certain body parts such as legs or wings that help them move, and mouths or trunks or beaks that help them drink water. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

[3] SC2.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of the structure, function, behavior, development, life cycles, and diversity of living organisms by sorting animals and plants into groups based on appearance and behaviors.

Grouping of Animals
Animals can be classified, or grouped together, by the things they have in common, such as how they act, where they live, or how they look. Scientists separate animals into two main groups related to whether the animal has a backbone in its body or not. Those animals with backbones are part of the vertebrates group. Those animals without a central backbone are invertebrates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How animals grow and change and live
Animals have certain traits which help them survive in their environment. These survival traits are called adaptations. Many adaptations are inherited, which means they are passed on from the parents of animal. Many animals have adaptations for eating such as the way a bird’s beak is shaped. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Animals
FreeThere are many different kinds of animals. The five main groups of animals are: Fish, birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Mammals and birds
What are Birds? Birds are warm-blooded animals that have: wings, feathers, a beak, no teeth, bones. Birds lay eggs. Their young hatch from those eggs. What Are Mammals? Mammals are animals that have hair. Mammals are the only animals with hair. Mammals are also warm-blooded. This means their body temperature stays the same, even if it is very cold or hot outside. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Reptiles, amphibians and fish
Reptiles have scales. Reptiles are born on land. Reptiles are cold-blooded which means their bodies change temperatures with the outside temperature around them. Reptiles lay eggs, and their babies hatch from those eggs. All amphibians begin their life in water with gills. As they grow, they develop lungs – which is what they use to breathe with on land. They grow legs to use on land too. Fish use gills to breathe. A fish stays in the water for its entire life! Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Plant growth and reproduction
Process of Reproduction. Fertilization, Seeds. Lesson Checkpoints: What is one reason a plant has nectar? What do mosses and ferns produce instead of seeds? What is the female organ of a flower called? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Vertebrates - Animals with Backbones
Scientists classify animals into two categories depending on if the animal has a backbone or not. As you know, invertebrates are animals that do NOT have a backbone and vertebrates are animals that DO have a backbone. Vertebrates are divided by scientists into five classes: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Classifying organisms
Scientific classification is the process of grouping living organisms into certain categories based on their characteristics, traits, and appearance. The order of scientific classification is kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. Each time we move to a different classification category, the groups get smaller and more specific. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

[3] SC2.2. The student demonstrates an understanding of the structure, function, behavior, development, life cycles, and diversity of living organisms by observing and comparing external features of plants and of animals that may help them grow, survive, and reproduce.

Main Parts of Plants
A plant has many important parts, such as its roots, stem, leaves, and flower. Each part of a plant has many functions that make it possible for a plant to live. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How do plants grow?
Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Plants
What are the Parts of a Plant? Let’s go from the bottom to the top: ROOTS, STEM, LEAVES, FLOWERS. Who Needs Plants? EVERYONE! Plants give off a gas called oxygen which is what we (and animals) need to breathe in to live. A plant's life cycle is how long a plant lives or how long it takes to grow, flower, and make seeds. All plants need water, air, and warm temperatures to grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Plant Structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. A plant has different parts that are all important in keeping the plant alive and healthy: Roots, Stem, Leaves. A plant’s roots collect water and minerals from soil for the rest of the plant. The main job of a plant’s stem is to carry water and minerals from the roots to the rest of the plant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

[3] SC3.1. The student demonstrates an understanding that all organisms are linked to each other and their physical environments through the transfer and transformation of matter and energy by identifying and sorting examples of living and non-living things in the local environment. (L)

How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

[3] SC3.2. The student demonstrates an understanding that all organisms are linked to each other and their physical environments through the transfer and transformation of matter and energy by organizing a simple food chain of familiar plants and animals. (L)

Relationships among living things
Living things interact in many ways. These interactions can help, harm, or do nothing to a living thing. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How do plants and animals live together?
Plants need air, water, sunlight, and room to grow in order to live. Animals need air, water, food, and shelter in order to live. What is a Shelter? It’s a safe place for an animal! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4

AK.D1. Concepts of Earth Science (SD1, SD2, SD3, SD4)

[3] SD1.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of geochemical cycles by recognizing that most rocks are composed of combinations of different substances.

Rocks, Soil and water
What are Rocks? Rocks are solid objects found in nature. Rocks are made up of minerals. What is Soil? Soil is the loose material the covers much of the Earth. Soil is also nonliving. Soil can be made of clay, sand, and humus. All living things need WATER to survive and to grow. The movement and recycling of the Earth’s water is called the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Rocks and minerals
FreeWhat is in a Rock? Rocks are made up of many tiny pieces of minerals. What are Minerals? Minerals are natural, nonliving crystals. They come in many sizes, shapes, and colors. Types of Rocks: Sedimentary Rocks, Igneous Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks. The Rock Cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

[3] SD1.2. The student demonstrates an understanding of geochemical cycles by describing the water cycle to show that water circulates through the crust, oceans, and atmosphere of Earth.

Science Worksheets: Water.
All living things need water to survive and to grow. For example, plants need water to make their own food, while fish need to live in water. The human body is made up of about 2/3 water. Water comes in three forms: liquid, solid, and gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Rocks, Soil and water
What are Rocks? Rocks are solid objects found in nature. Rocks are made up of minerals. What is Soil? Soil is the loose material the covers much of the Earth. Soil is also nonliving. Soil can be made of clay, sand, and humus. All living things need WATER to survive and to grow. The movement and recycling of the Earth’s water is called the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Earth's Waters
Did you know that three quarters (3/4) of Earth is covered by water? Freshwater is water containing only a very little amount of salt. Oceans are made of salt water. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of the Earth’s water is saltwater. Throughout the water cycle, water can be solid, liquid, and a gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

[3] SD2.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of the forces that shape Earth by identifying and comparing a variety of Earth's land features (i.e., rivers, deltas, lakes, glaciers, mountains, valleys, and islands).

Changes on earth
A glacier is a slow moving large body of ice. A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s crust from which hot, melted rock forcefully comes out when pressure is built up inside the Earth. An earthquake is a sudden shift in the Earth’s crust that causes the ground to shake and vibrate violently. Weathering is the process of rocks being changed over time by conditions such as rain, snow, ice, pressure.Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

[3] SD3.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of cycles influenced by energy from the sun and by Earth's position and motion in our solar system by using recorded weather patterns (e.g., temperature, cloud cover, or precipitation) to make reasonable predictions. (L)

Weather
What is the weather like outside? Weather is the condition of the air outside. Weather involves many things, such as clouds, temperature, water in the air, and the wind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Weather and Climate
Many factors affect the weather such as the sun, atmosphere, temperature, water, and air pressure. When air moves from an area of high pressure to a place with low pressure, WIND is created. The movement and interaction of air masses cause most weather conditions. Climate: The word climate refers to the typical weather throughout the year in the same area. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

[3] SD4.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of the theories regarding the origin and evolution of the universe by recognizing that objects appear smaller the farther away they are.

Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

[3] SD4.2. The student demonstrates an understanding of the theories regarding the origin and evolution of the universe by recognizing that objects have properties, locations, and movements that can be observed and described.

Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

AK.E1. Science and Technology (SE1, SE2, SE3)

[3] SE2.1. The student demonstrates an understanding that solving problems involves different ways of thinking, perspectives, and curiosity by identifying local tools and materials used in everyday life. (L)

Science in our world
What is Technology? Technology is using science in order to solve different problems. Technology uses things we know about science to make tools for people to make doing work easier. Technology can be as simple as a hammer. Technology keeps us safe (in our houses, our cars). Technology supplies us with the things we need to live. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

[3] SE3.1. The student demonstrates an understanding of how scientific discoveries and technological innovations affect our lives and society by listing the positive and negative effects of a single technological development in the local community (e.g., fish trap, fish wheel, four-wheeler, computer). (L)

Science in our world
What is Technology? Technology is using science in order to solve different problems. Technology uses things we know about science to make tools for people to make doing work easier. Technology can be as simple as a hammer. Technology keeps us safe (in our houses, our cars). Technology supplies us with the things we need to live. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

AK.SA. Science as Inquiry and Process: A student should understand and be able to apply the processes and applications of scientific inquiry. A student who meets the content standard should:

SA1. Develop an understanding of the processes of science used to investigate problems, design and conduct repeatable scientific investigations, and defend scientific arguments.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry - 3rd grade
Science Process Skills: Observing, Classifying, Estimating, Predicting/Hypothesis, Making Inferences, Models, Investigating, Collecting Data, Interpreting Data. Scientific Method: Ask a question, Write an Hypothesis, Create a control variable, Conduct an Experiment, Record Your Data, Decide Your Final Answer, State Your Final Answer. Science Tools. Safety in Science. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

AK.SB. Concepts of Physical Science: A student should understand and be able to apply the concepts, models, theories, universal principles, and facts that explain the physical world. A student who meets the content standard should:

SB1. Develop an understanding of the characteristic properties of matter and the relationship of these properties to their structure and behavior.

Matter and its properties
Everything around us is made out matter. Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. All matter is made up of many different kinds of particles that are combined together in different ways. A property of matter is a feature, trait, or characteristic. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

SB2. Develop an understanding that energy appears in different forms, can be transformed from one form to another, can be transferred or moved from one place or system to another, may be unavailable for use, and is ultimately conserved.

Electricity and magnetism
Electricity is the flow of electrical charge. Atoms are made of three different particles, of which some have a positive charge, some have a negative charge, and some have no charge at all. Static Electricity is the imbalance of positive or negative charges between objects. If two objects have opposite charges, they’ll pull toward each other. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

SB3. Develop an understanding of the interactions between matter and energy, including physical, chemical, and nuclear changes, and the effects of these interactions on physical systems.

Changes in matter
A physical change is when something changes its appearance without changing its makeup. An example of a physical change is chopping wood. An example of a chemical change is burning the wood. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Matter
Matter is ALL Around Us! Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Matter is made up of atoms. Atoms are the basic building blocks of matter and make up all objects. Matter change states from solid, liquid, or gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

SB4. Develop an understanding of motions, forces, their characteristics and relationships, and natural forces and their effects.

Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4

AK.SC. Concepts of Life Science: A student should understand and be able to apply the concepts, models, theories, facts, evidence, systems, and processes of life science. A student who meets the content standard should:

SC2. Develop an understanding of the structure, function, behavior, development, life cycles, and diversity of living organisms.

How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How do plants and animals live together?
Plants need air, water, sunlight, and room to grow in order to live. Animals need air, water, food, and shelter in order to live. What is a Shelter? It’s a safe place for an animal! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

SC3. Develop an understanding that all organisms are linked to each other and their physical environments through the transfer and transformation of matter and energy.

Relationships among living things
Living things interact in many ways. These interactions can help, harm, or do nothing to a living thing. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Science Worksheets: Water.
All living things need water to survive and to grow. For example, plants need water to make their own food, while fish need to live in water. The human body is made up of about 2/3 water. Water comes in three forms: liquid, solid, and gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How do plants and animals live together?
Plants need air, water, sunlight, and room to grow in order to live. Animals need air, water, food, and shelter in order to live. What is a Shelter? It’s a safe place for an animal! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Earth's Waters
Did you know that three quarters (3/4) of Earth is covered by water? Freshwater is water containing only a very little amount of salt. Oceans are made of salt water. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of the Earth’s water is saltwater. Throughout the water cycle, water can be solid, liquid, and a gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :4
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

AK.SD. Concepts of Earth Science: A student should understand and be able to apply the concepts, processes, theories, models, evidence, and systems of earth and space sciences. A student who meets the content standard should:

SD1. Develop an understanding of Earth's geochemical cycles.

Science Worksheets: Water.
All living things need water to survive and to grow. For example, plants need water to make their own food, while fish need to live in water. The human body is made up of about 2/3 water. Water comes in three forms: liquid, solid, and gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth's Waters
Did you know that three quarters (3/4) of Earth is covered by water? Freshwater is water containing only a very little amount of salt. Oceans are made of salt water. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of the Earth’s water is saltwater. Throughout the water cycle, water can be solid, liquid, and a gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

SD2. Develop an understanding of the origins, ongoing processes, and forces that shape the structure, composition, and physical history of the Earth.

Earth yesterday and today
Life on Earth Has Changed. Many kinds of animals that used to live on Earth are no longer living. They are extinct. Reasons for Extinction: Big changes in the climate. Many times animals could not handle these big changes in the weather. Good news: Many animals have adapted to many changes that happen on Earth so that they CAN survive and NOT become extinct! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

SD3. Develop an understanding of the cyclical changes controlled by energy from the sun and by Earth's position and motion in our solar system.

Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
The sun and earth
The Sun is a large hot ball of gas. It is also a star. The Sun gives Earth light and heat. Living things need the Sun to live! Sun rays shine on the moon at night which makes the moon bright! The Earth is the third planet from the Sun. There are four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

AK.SG. History and Nature of Science: A student should understand the history and nature of science. A student who meets the content standard should:

SG1. Develop an understanding that historical perspectives of scientific explanations demonstrate that scientific knowledge changes over time, building on prior knowledge.

Science in our world
Have you ever seen a meteor shower? Meteors are small fragments of debris from space that enter the Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speed. They then turn into a vapor r leaving a streak of light that disappears quickly. You hear on the radio that a high air pressure system will be moving in tomorrow, which means there is a very good chance of clear skies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

SG3. Develop an understanding that scientific knowledge is ongoing and subject to change as new evidence becomes available through experimental and/or observational confirmation(s).

Science in our world
Have you ever seen a meteor shower? Meteors are small fragments of debris from space that enter the Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speed. They then turn into a vapor r leaving a streak of light that disappears quickly. You hear on the radio that a high air pressure system will be moving in tomorrow, which means there is a very good chance of clear skies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1