Utah Core Standards for Third Grade Science

All About Energy
Energy is the ability to do work. There are two types of energy. One type of energy is energy that is waiting to happen but has not happened yet. This is called potential energy. Another type of energy is called kinetic energy. This type of energy is energy that is happening now. Read more...iWorksheets: 5Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Changes in matter
A physical change is when something changes its appearance without changing its makeup. An example of a physical change is chopping wood. An example of a chemical change is burning the wood. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Changes on earth
A glacier is a slow moving large body of ice. A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s crust from which hot, melted rock forcefully comes out when pressure is built up inside the Earth. An earthquake is a sudden shift in the Earth’s crust that causes the ground to shake and vibrate violently. Weathering is the process of rocks being changed over time by conditions such as rain, snow, ice, pressure.Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Grouping of Animals
Animals can be classified, or grouped together, by the things they have in common, such as how they act, where they live, or how they look. Scientists separate animals into two main groups related to whether the animal has a backbone in its body or not. Those animals with backbones are part of the vertebrates group. Those animals without a central backbone are invertebrates. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
How animals grow and change and live
Animals have certain traits which help them survive in their environment. These survival traits are called adaptations. Many adaptations are inherited, which means they are passed on from the parents of animal. Many animals have adaptations for eating such as the way a bird’s beak is shaped. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
How do plants grow?
Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Plants need their space too! If a plant grows too close to other plants, it may not grow healthy and strong, because the plants may compete over the available water, nutrients, and space in the soil for their roots to grow. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 3
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
A life cycle describes the stages an animal or plant goes through from birth to death. Some vertebrates change their appearance a lot during their life cycle while others hardly change at all. Most plants begin as a seed. A seed is a tiny plant, an embryo, in a little package. A seed stays inactive and doesn’t start growing until the conditions surrounding it are just right for it to start growing. Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 2
Math in Science
Numbers, measuring, making graphs, calculating, adding, subtracting, and more…there is a lot of Math involved in Science. Whether you are studying plants, animals, or the solar system, you will use Math procedures during your investigations and data recording. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Matter and its properties
Everything around us is made out matter. Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. All matter is made up of many different kinds of particles that are combined together in different ways. A property of matter is a feature, trait, or characteristic. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Natural resources
Natural resources are found on the Earth and are important to living things. Some natural resources come from below the Earth’s surface. Some natural resources are nonrenewable, which means that can not be replaced. Some natural resources are renewable. Three examples of natural resources we have in abundance on Earth are: sunlight, air, and water. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Science in our world - 3rd gr.
Everywhere we look, there are signs of SCIENCE! Science is all around us: Sounds We Hear, Energy We See and Feel, Work and Machines We Use and See, Forces, Motion, and How Things Move Around Us (gravity), Changes in Matter We See, Weather We See Outside, Water that We Use, Natural Resources We Use and Need to Conserve Everyday (recycling). Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Science Worksheets: Water.
All living things need water to survive and to grow. For example, plants need water to make their own food, while fish need to live in water. The human body is made up of about 2/3 water. Water comes in three forms: liquid, solid, and gas. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Sound
Sound is energy that travels in a wave that is caused by vibrations. Vibrations are movements made rapidly back and forth. Vibrations travel through the air and into your ear. You hear sounds when vibrating air causes your eardrum to vibrate. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
The solar system
The Sun is a gigantic star that is made up of hot gases called plasma. The solar system includes the Sun, planets, the moons of each planet, as well as other objects that revolve around the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Weather
What is the weather like outside? Weather is the condition of the air outside. Weather involves many things, such as clouds, temperature, water in the air, and the wind. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
What are Ecosystems?
An ecosystem is a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water, and mineral soil. Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 4
Where plants and animals live
An environment is everything that surrounds a living thing or person. Everything that lives on Earth lives in a certain environment. Living things get everything they need to survive from their environment. An environment also includes nonliving things. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1

UT.1. Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.a. Observe simple objects and patterns and report their observations.

Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.c. Make simple predictions and inferences based upon observations.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry - 3rd grade
Science Process Skills: Observing, Classifying, Estimating, Predicting/Hypothesis, Making Inferences, Models, Investigating, Collecting Data, Interpreting Data. Scientific Method: Ask a question, Write an Hypothesis, Create a control variable, Conduct an Experiment, Record Your Data, Decide Your Final Answer, State Your Final Answer. Science Tools. Safety in Science. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.d. Compare things and events.

Grouping of Plants
Plants are often put into groups by the type of parts or structures they have. They can be grouped according to their types of leaves, stems, flowers, roots, and even seeds. Many plants have leaves that look similar while others have totally different kinds of leaves. Plant and tree leaves may be different in size, shape, and color. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Animals
FreeThere are many different kinds of animals. The five main groups of animals are: Fish, birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

1.e. Use instruments to measure length, temperature, volume, and weight using appropriate units.

Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.f. Conduct a simple investigation when given directions.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry - 3rd grade
Science Process Skills: Observing, Classifying, Estimating, Predicting/Hypothesis, Making Inferences, Models, Investigating, Collecting Data, Interpreting Data. Scientific Method: Ask a question, Write an Hypothesis, Create a control variable, Conduct an Experiment, Record Your Data, Decide Your Final Answer, State Your Final Answer. Science Tools. Safety in Science. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

1.g. Develop and use simple classification systems.

Rocks, Minerals, and soil
Rocks are solid material found in nature made up of minerals. A mineral is a natural material usually found in the ground. A rock has physical properties like color and composition, or what exact minerals make up the rock. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Classifying organisms
Scientific classification is the process of grouping living organisms into certain categories based on their characteristics, traits, and appearance. The order of scientific classification is kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. Each time we move to a different classification category, the groups get smaller and more specific. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Rocks and minerals
FreeWhat is in a Rock? Rocks are made up of many tiny pieces of minerals. What are Minerals? Minerals are natural, nonliving crystals. They come in many sizes, shapes, and colors. Types of Rocks: Sedimentary Rocks, Igneous Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks. The Rock Cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

1.h. Use observations to construct a reasonable explanation.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

UT.3. Intended Learning Outcome: Understand Science Concepts and Principles.

3.c. Explain science concepts and principles using their own words and explanations.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

UT.4. Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.a. Record data accurately when given the appropriate form and format (e.g., table, graph, chart).

Math in Science
Charts and Graphs. Studying Plants. Studying Animals. Studying Water Habitats, Studying How Living Things Grow and Change. Studying Energy Needs. Studying Earth's Weather. Studying the Sun and the Earth. Studying the Moon, Stars, and Planets. Studying Earth, Yesterday and Today. Using and Saving Natural Resources. Hands-on Lab Skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

4.c. Use scientific language appropriate to grade level in oral and written communication.

Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
When you conduct an investigation, you may make predictions, interpret your findings, draw conclusions, and justify your conclusions. When you conduct an experiment, you should collect data to help justify your conclusions. During an investigation, you may formulate and justify your predictions based on cause and effect relationships. A cause makes something else happen. An effect is what happens because of the cause. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

UT.I. Students will understand that the shape of Earth and the moon are spherical and that Earth rotates on its axis to produce the appearance of the sun and moon moving through the sky.

I.1. Describe the appearance of Earth and the moon.

I.1.a. Describe the shape of Earth and the moon as spherical.
Moon, star and planets
The moon moves around the Earth. A star is a hot ball of gas, stars give off light. The Sun is a star. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
I.1.b. Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Moon, star and planets
The moon moves around the Earth. A star is a hot ball of gas, stars give off light. The Sun is a star. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
I.1.c. List the differences in the physical appearance of Earth and the moon as viewed from space.
Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Moon, star and planets
The moon moves around the Earth. A star is a hot ball of gas, stars give off light. The Sun is a star. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

I.2. Describe the movement of Earth and the moon and the apparent movement of other bodies through the sky.

I.2.a. Describe the motions of Earth (i.e., the rotation [spinning] of Earth on its axis, the revolution [orbit] of Earth around the sun).
Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
The sun and earth
The Sun is a large hot ball of gas. It is also a star. The Sun gives Earth light and heat. Living things need the Sun to live! Sun rays shine on the moon at night which makes the moon bright! The Earth is the third planet from the Sun. There are four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
I.2.b. Use a chart to show that the moon orbits Earth approximately every 28 days.
Earth in space
FreeThe Sun, which is a star, is Earth's source of heat and light. The earth travels in circles around the Sun. The Earth’s rotation every 24 hours results in day and night on Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Moon, star and planets
The moon moves around the Earth. A star is a hot ball of gas, stars give off light. The Sun is a star. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
I.2.c. Use a model of Earth to demonstrate that Earth rotates on its axis once every 24 hours to produce the night and day cycle.
The sun and earth
The Sun is a large hot ball of gas. It is also a star. The Sun gives Earth light and heat. Living things need the Sun to live! Sun rays shine on the moon at night which makes the moon bright! The Earth is the third planet from the Sun. There are four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar system and beyond
What Can Be Found in the Solar System? A planet is a large body that revolves around the Sun. Asteroids, comets and meteors are made of pieces of rock and ice. Asteroids are small pieces of rock which orbit around the Sun. Comets are made of ice and rock. The “tail” of a comet is made of vaporized gases and dust that flow behind them as they fly through space at a VERY fast pace! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

UT.II. Students will understand that organisms depend on living and nonliving things within their environment.

II.1. Classify living and nonliving things in an environment.

II.1.a. Identify characteristics of living things (i.e., growth, movement, reproduction).
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
II.1.b. Identify characteristics of nonliving things.
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
II.1.c. Classify living and nonliving things in an environment.
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Classifying organisms
Scientific classification is the process of grouping living organisms into certain categories based on their characteristics, traits, and appearance. The order of scientific classification is kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. Each time we move to a different classification category, the groups get smaller and more specific. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

II.2. Describe the interactions between living and nonliving things in a small environment.

II.2.a. Identify living and nonliving things in a small environment (e.g., terrarium, aquarium, flowerbed) composed of living and nonliving things.
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
II.2.b. Predict the effects of changes in the environment (e.g., temperature, light, moisture) on a living organism.
Ecosystems and changes in ecosystems
What is an ecosystem? An ecosystem is the living and nonliving components of an environment and the way they interact with each other and their environment. There are several different ecosystems on the Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
II.2.c. Observe and record the effect of changes (e.g., temperature, amount of water, light) upon the living organisms and nonliving things in a small-scale environment.
Ecosystems and changes in ecosystems
What is an ecosystem? An ecosystem is the living and nonliving components of an environment and the way they interact with each other and their environment. There are several different ecosystems on the Earth. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
II.2.e. Pose a question about the interaction between living and nonliving things in the environment that could be investigated by observation.
Animals and their needs
All animals need certain things in order to survive. Animals need water, food, movement, protection, shelter, reproduction, and oxygen to survive, and they have many different body parts to get these things they need. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Relationships among living things
Living things interact in many ways. These interactions can help, harm, or do nothing to a living thing. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How do plants and animals live together?
Plants need air, water, sunlight, and room to grow in order to live. Animals need air, water, food, and shelter in order to live. What is a Shelter? It’s a safe place for an animal! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Plant growth and reproduction
Process of Reproduction. Fertilization, Seeds. Lesson Checkpoints: What is one reason a plant has nectar? What do mosses and ferns produce instead of seeds? What is the female organ of a flower called? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

UT.III. Students will understand the relationship between the force applied to an object and resulting motion of the object.

III.1. Demonstrate how forces cause changes in speed or direction of objects.

III.1.a. Show that objects at rest will not move unless a force is applied to them.
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
III.1.b. Compare the forces of pushing and pulling.
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
III.1.c. Investigate how forces applied through simple machines affect the direction and/or amount of resulting force.
Work and machines
Work is when you use force upon an object causing the object to move. The amount of work you do has to do with how much force you need to use. Simple machines make doing work easier but they never decrease the amount of work that needs to be done. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 3rd grade
There are so many amazing scientific facts out there, waiting to be discovered by you! Check out some of the incredible ‘Did You Know? facts that have to do with many of the science topics you learn about in 3rd Grade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

III.2. Demonstrate that the greater the force applied to an object, the greater the change in speed or direction of the object.

III.2.a. Predict and observe what happens when a force is applied to an object (e.g., wind, flowing water).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
III.2.e. Show how these concepts apply to various activities (e.g., batting a ball, kicking a ball, hitting a golf ball with a golf club) in terms of force, motion, speed, direction, and distance (e.g. slow, fast, hit hard, hit soft).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

UT.IV. Students will understand that objects near Earth are pulled toward Earth by gravity.

IV.2. Describe the effects of gravity on the motion of an object.

IV.2.a. Compare how the motion of an object rolling up or down a hill changes with the incline of the hill.
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
IV.2.b. Observe, record, and compare the effect of gravity on several objects in motion (e.g., a thrown ball and a dropped ball falling to Earth).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
IV.2.c. Pose questions about gravity and forces.
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

UT.V. Students will understand that the sun is the main source of heat and light for things living on Earth. They will also understand that the motion of rubbing objects together may produce heat.

V.1. Provide evidence showing that the sun is the source of heat and light for Earth.

V.1.b. Observe and report how sunlight affects plant growth.
Main Parts of Plants
A plant has many important parts, such as its roots, stem, leaves, and flower. Each part of a plant has many functions that make it possible for a plant to live. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Plant Structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. A plant has different parts that are all important in keeping the plant alive and healthy: Roots, Stem, Leaves. A plant’s roots collect water and minerals from soil for the rest of the plant. The main job of a plant’s stem is to carry water and minerals from the roots to the rest of the plant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Food webs/food chains
We all need energy. Every living organism on Earth needs energy to live, including plants, animals and us! The main energy source for all living things on Earth is the Sun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

V.3. Demonstrate that heat may be produced when objects are rubbed against one another.

V.3.b. Compare relative differences in the amount of heat given off or force required to move an object over lubricated/non-lubricated surfaces and smooth/rough surfaces (e.g., waterslide with and without water, hands rubbing together with and without lotion).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force, motion and energy
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. A force is a push or pull upon an object. Speed refers to the rate an object changes position. To accelerate means to go faster; decelerate means to slow down. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
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