Social Studies Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Forming a Government

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

U.S. National Standards

N.NCSS. National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies (NCSS)
NCSS.10. CIVIC IDEALS AND PRACTICES
SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF THE IDEALS, PRINCIPLES, AND PRACTICES OF CITIZENSHIP IN A DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC.
10.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
10.1.2. Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent.
10.1.6. The origins and function of major institutions and practices developed to support democratic ideals and practices.
10.1.7. Key past and present issues involving democratic ideals and practices, as well as the perspectives of various stakeholders in proposing possible solutions to these issues.
NCSS.2. TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE
SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF THE PAST AND ITS LEGACY.
2.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
2.1.8. The history of democratic ideals and principles, and how they are represented in documents, artifacts and symbols.
NCSS.6. POWER, AUTHORITY, AND GOVERNANCE
SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF HOW PEOPLE CREATE, INTERACT WITH, AND CHANGE STRUCTURES OF POWER, AUTHORITY, AND GOVERNANCE.
6.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
6.1.1. Rights are guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution, the supreme law of the land.
6.1.2. Fundamental ideas that are the foundation of American constitutional democracy (including those of the U.S. Constitution, popular sovereignty, the rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, minority rights, the separation of church and state, and Federalism).
6.1.3. Fundamental values of constitutional democracy (e.g., the common good, liberty, justice, equality, and individual dignity).
N.NSCG. National Standards for Civics and Government (NSCG)
I.A. What are civic life, politics, and government? What is civic life? What is politics? What is government? Why are government and politics necessary? What purposes should government serve?
I.A.1. Defining civic life, politics, and government. Students should be able to explain the meaning of the terms civic life, politics, and government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.A.1.5. Identify institutions with authority to direct or control the behavior of members of a society, e.g., a school board, city council, state legislature, courts, Congress
I.B. What are civic life, politics, and government? What are the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited government?
I.B.1. Limited and unlimited governments. Students should be able to describe the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited governments. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.B.1.2. Identify historical and contemporary examples of limited and unlimited governments and justify their classification, e.g.,
I.B.1.2.a. Limited governments--United States, Great Britain, Botswana, Japan, Israel, Chile
I.D. What are civic life, politics, and government? What are alternative ways of organizing constitutional governments?
I.D.1. Shared powers and parliamentary systems. Students should be able to describe the major characteristics of systems of shared powers and of parliamentary systems. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.D.1.1. Describe the major characteristics of systems of shared powers, e.g., in the United States
I.D.1.1.a. The president and members of the Cabinet cannot be members of Congress
I.D.1.1.b. Powers are separated among branches, each branch has primary responsibility for certain functions, e.g., legislative, executive, and judicial
I.D.1.1.c. Each branch also shares the powers and functions of the other branches, e.g., Congress may pass laws, but the president may veto them; the president nominates certain public officials, but the Senate needs to approve them; Congress may pass laws, but the Supreme Court may declare them unconstitutional
I.D.2. Confederal, federal, and unitary systems. Students should be able to explain the advantages and disadvantages of confederal, federal, and unitary systems of government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.D.2.2. Identify examples of confederal, federal, and unitary systems in the history of the United States, e.g.,
I.D.2.2.a. Confederal system--the United States under the Articles of Confederation and the Confederate States of America
II.A. What are the foundations of the American political system? What is the American idea of constitutional government?
II.A.1. The American idea of constitutional government. Students should be able to explain the essential ideas of American constitutional government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.A.1.1. Explain essential ideas of American constitutional government as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other writings, e.g.,
II.A.1.1.a. The people are sovereign; they are the ultimate source of power
II.A.1.1.c. The purposes of government, as stated in the Preamble to the Constitution, are to form a more perfect union; establish justice; insure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; promote the general welfare; secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity
II.A.1.3. Explain the means of limiting the powers of government under the United States Constitution
II.A.1.3.a. Separation and sharing of powers
II.A.1.3.b. Checks and balances
II.A.1.3.c. Bill of Rights
II.A.1.4. Explain how specific provisions of the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, limit the powers of government in order to protect the rights of individuals, e.g., habeas corpus; trial by jury; ex post facto; freedom of religion, speech, press, and assembly; equal protection of the law; due process of law; right to counsel
II.C. What are the foundations of the American political system? What is American political culture?
II.C.1. American identity. Students should be able to explain the importance of shared political values and principles to American society. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.C.1.1. Explain that an American's identity stems from belief in and allegiance to shared political values and principles rather than from ethnicity, race, religion, class, language, gender, or national origin, which determine identity in most other nations
II.C.1.2. Identify basic values and principles Americans share as set forth in such documents as the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Gettysburg Address
II.C.1.3. Explain why it is important to the individual and society that Americans understand and act on their shared political values and principles
II.C.2. The character of American political conflict. Students should be able to describe the character of American political conflict and explain factors that usually prevent violence or that lower its intensity. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.C.2.1. Describe political conflict in the United States both historically and at present, such as conflict about
II.C.2.1.d. Extending the franchise
II.D. What are the foundations of the American political system? What values and principles are basic to American constitutional democracy?
II.D.1. Fundamental values and principles. Students should be able to explain the meaning and importance of the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.1.2. Explain the meaning and importance of each of the following values considered to be fundamental to American public life
II.D.1.2.d. Justice
II.D.1.2.e. Equality
II.D.1.2.g. Openness and free inquiry
II.D.1.2.h. Truth
II.D.1.3. Explain the meaning and importance of the following fundamental principles of American constitutional democracy
II.D.1.3.b. Constitutional government which includes the rule of law; representative institutions; shared powers; checks and balances; individual rights; separation of church and state; federalism; civilian control of the military
II.D.2. Conflicts among values and principles in American political and social life. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues in which fundamental values and principles are in conflict. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.2.1. Describe conflicts among fundamental values and principles and give historical and contemporary examples of these conflicts, such as
II.D.2.1.a. Conflicts between liberty and equality, e.g., liberty to exclude others from private clubs and the right of individuals to be treated equally
II.D.3. Disparities between ideals and reality in American political and social life. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues concerning ways and means to reduce disparities between American ideals and realities. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.3.1. Identify some important American ideals, e.g., liberty and justice for all, an informed citizenry, civic virtue or concern for the common good, respect for the rights of others
II.D.3.2. Explain the importance of ideals as goals, even if they are not fully achieved
II.D.3.4. Describe historical and contemporary efforts to reduce discrepancies between ideals and the reality of American public life, e.g., abolition, suffrage, civil rights, and environmental protection movements
III.A. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution?
III.A.1. Distributing, sharing, and limiting powers of the national government. Students should be able to explain how the powers of the national government are distributed, shared, and limited. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.A.1.1. Explain how the three opening words of the Preamble to the Constitution, ''We the People...,'' embody the principle of the people as sovereign--the ultimate source of authority
III.A.1.2. Explain how legislative, executive, and judicial powers are distributed and shared among the three branches of the national government
III.A.1.2.a. Legislative power--although primary legislative power lies with Congress, it is shared with the other branches, e.g., the executive branch can submit bills for consideration and can establish regulations, the Supreme Court can interpret laws and can declare them unconstitutional
III.A.1.2.b. Executive power--although primary executive power is with the executive branch, it is shared by the other branches, e.g., congressional committees have authority to review actions of the executive branch, the Senate must approve appointments and ratify treaties, the Supreme Court can review actions of the executive branch and declare them unconstitutional
III.A.1.2.c. Judicial power--although primary judicial power is with the federal judiciary, it is shared with other branches, e.g., the president appoints federal judges, the Senate can approve or refuse to confirm federal court appointees, the executive branch can hold administrative hearings on compliance with regulations and laws, Congress can ''overturn'' a Supreme Court interpretation of a law by amending it
III.A.1.3. Explain how each branch of government can check the powers of the other branches
III.A.1.3.a. Legislative branch has the power to establish committees to oversee activities of the executive branch; impeach the president, other members of the executive branch, and federal judges; pass laws over the president's veto by two-thirds majority vote of both Houses; disapprove appointments made by the president; propose amendments to the United States Constitution
III.A.1.3.b. Executive branch has the power to veto laws passed by Congress; nominate members of the federal judiciary
III.A.1.3.c. Judicial branch has the power to overrule decisions made by lower courts; declare laws made by Congress to be unconstitutional; declare actions of the executive branch to be unconstitutional
III.A.2. Sharing of powers between the national and state governments. Students should be able to explain how and why powers are distributed and shared between national and state governments in the federal system. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.A.2.5. Explain how and why the United States Constitution provides that laws of the national government and treaties are the supreme law of the land
IV.B. What is the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs? How has the United States influenced other nations and how have other nations influenced American politics and society?
IV.B.1. Impact of the American concept of democracy and individual rights on the world. Students should be able to describe the influence of American political ideas on other nations. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
IV.B.1.1. Describe the impact on other nations of the American Revolution and of the values and principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights
V.B. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? What are the rights of citizens?
V.B.1. Personal rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues involving personal rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.1.2. Identify the major documentary sources of personal rights, e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, state constitutions
V.B.2. Political rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues involving political rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.2.3. Identify major statements of political rights in documents such as the Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, state constitutions, and civil rights legislation
V.E. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? How can citizens take part in civic life?
V.E.5. Knowledge and participation. Students should be able to explain the importance of knowledge to competent and responsible participation in American democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.E.5.3. Evaluate the claim that constitutional democracy requires the participation of an attentive, knowledgeable, and competent citizenry