Social Studies Worksheets and Study Guides Seventh Grade. Women's Rights

The resources above correspond to the standards listed below:

Utah Core Standards

UT.USI. UNITED STATES HISTORY I
USI.5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS AND PROCESSES (Ca. 1783–1861)
The United States’ constitutional republic and the political systems that Americans are familiar with took shape as the Constitution was interpreted and applied. Reformers have worked to ensure that increasing numbers and classes of people enjoy the rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. Opposing political parties have worked to mold the leadership, laws, and policies of the new nation in order to fit their vision of America. The first half of the nineteenth century was rich with examples of these organizing efforts that have set precedents still followed in the 21st century.
USI.5.2. Students will identify the conditions that gave rise to, and evaluate the impact of, social and political reform movements such as Jacksonian Democracy, the women’s rights movement, the Abolitionist movement, and anti-immigration reform.
UT.WH. WORLD HISTORY
WH.5. REVOLUTIONS, INDUSTRIALIZATION, AND EMPIRES (Ca. 1750 C.E.–1914 C.E.)
The era between 1750 and 1914 was filled with scientific, industrial, intellectual, cultural, technological, and political revolutions. The Industrial Revolution raised the standard of living for many, but also expanded inequalities between and within nations. New ideas about the role of government and national identities led to political innovation, with revolutions and independence movements occurring in North America, Latin America, and France. Elsewhere, earlier trends in colonization continued and intensified, with colonial empires integrating nearly all societies. Human migration occurred on a massive scale as demographic trends shifted, slavery declined, and industrialized centers demanded workers.
WH.5.6. Students will identify the key ideas and characteristics of current political, economic, and intellectual revolutions such as a contemporary revolution, a social movement, or an independence movement.
UT.USII. UNITED STATES HISTORY II
USII.2. REFORM MOVEMENTS (Ca. 1880–1920)
Industrialization and urbanization changed American society in fundamental ways. Reform movements grew in response to these new realities. Urban settings made it easier for people to organize reform movements and recruit new members. The women’s suffrage movement, the Progressive movement, the rise of the temperance movement, and the growth of a number of additional labor, health, and educational reform movements developed as individuals and groups worked to solve society’s new challenges.
USII.2.1. Students will use primary and secondary sources to identify and explain the conditions that led to the rise of reform movements, such as organized labor, suffrage, and temperance.
USII.2.2. Students will explain how social reform movements influenced Constitutional amendments and changes to laws and democratic processes.
UT.CC.RH.6-8. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies
Craft and Structure
RH.6-8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
RH.6-8.5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
RH.6-8.10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Standards

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