Maryland Standards for Seventh Grade Science

Acids, bases and salts
An acid is a compound that is defined by its physical and chemical properties. Acids taste sour and react with metals and polyatomic ions called carbonates. A carbonate is a charged cluster of Carbon and Oxygen atoms. In addition, when tested with blue litmus paper, acids turn the paper red. A base or hydroxide, like an acid, is also defined by its properties. Bases taste bitter, are slippery to the touch and turn red litmus paper blue. An example of a base is NaOH or sodium hydroxide. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Agents of Erosion and Deposition
FreeForces of weathering and erosion are constantly reshaping Earth's surface. Erosion includes the chemical and physical breakdown of rocks and their transport from their point of origin to another location. Blowing wind, running water, flowing ice and and gravity are the forces that erode rock and sculpt the landscape. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Bacteria and Viruses
Bacteria are prokaryotes, meaning that their DNA is in the cytoplasm because they do not have a nucleus. In addition to not having a nucleus, bacteria also do not have many of the other structures that are found in a eukaryotic cell. However, they still meet the criteria for being a living organism. There are three different shapes of bacteria: spiral, rod, and spherical shaped. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Chemistry in our world
Chemistry literally affects us twenty four hours a day. At any one moment in our bodies, thousands of chemical reactions are occurring. All of these reactions are controlled by catalyst-like chemicals called enzymes. Most of the chemical digestion of food we eat gets done in our small intestines with enzymes. Outside our bodies, chemicals and their reactions help us in many practical ways. Composites are mixtures of two or more substances, many of which are polymers with different properties, combine to give us better products. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Climate
One key factor affecting climate is latitude. Because the Earth is a globe, the sun’s rays hit the equator more directly than they do near the poles. A second factor is that the Earth is tilted at 23.5 degrees on its axis as it rotates around the sun. As it does, the Northern and Southern hemispheres are either pointing toward or away from the sun’s rays. Consequently, lands near the equator have smaller temperature fluctuations throughout the year. The climate is predictably warm and humid. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Earthquakes
The theory of plate tectonics describes the movement of the plates of the lithosphere relative to each other. This movement creates forces that push and pull on the crust. Crustal rock can absorb and store energy, but only so much. There is a point at which the stress is more than the rock can hold and the rock breaks. When the rock breaks, the stored energy is released and this energy travels through the Earth. This sudden release of energy created when rocks break is called an earthquake Read more...iWorksheets: 5Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 6
Energy and energy resources
Mechanical energy is the energy of a moving object such as an airplane in flight. Thermal energy or heat energy: When a sidewalk warms up from the sun it now has thermal energy. Electrical energy speaks for itself. Whenever electricity is used, its energy is being used. Chemical energy is the energy that gets released when chemical bonds are broken. Electromagnetic energy is energy that travels in waves. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Exploring the Oceans/Oceanography
FreeThe oceans are highly comples environments. The oceans consist of different zones and habitats. As one moves deeper, the amount of light decreases, water temperature decreases and water pressure increases. There changing factors determine the zones and habitats and which organisms can live in each. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Forces
Force is a pull or a push and its strength is measured in units called newtons and represented by the symbol F. Forces can act in combination and produce what is referred to as net force. Gravity is a type of force that pulls objects towards each other and toward the earth. Newton’s first law is that an object that is at rest will remain at rest and that an object in motion will continue in motion. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Mixtures, solutions and compounds
Mixtures, unlike compounds, are the physical combination of different substances. Solutions are a type of mixture with at least one solute and solvent. In a solution, finely dissolved particles of a solute are dissolved by the solvent. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Motion
When motion occurs, there is speed and velocity. Speed is calculated by dividing the distance traveled by the time it took to travel. Velocity has an additional component. Velocity tells you how fast an object is going and where it is going. Therefore, if two objects have the same speed, but are going in different directions, they will have different velocities. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Our Solar System
Solar systems begin in the dust and gas clouds found in between the stars. The dust is composed of elements like iron and carbon. The gas is hydrogen and helium. These dusty clouds are called nebulae. Here these particles start to come together to form planets. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 3
Technology in our world
Engineers use technology to meet human demands and to provide solutions to our problems. Of all the types of consumer goods, clearly electronics seems to have benefited most from technological development. One example of this is in the area of wireless technology. Cell phones using networks of microwave generating cell towers have dramatically changed the way we communicate. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
The Sun-Earth-Moon System
The Earth is simultaneously spinning on its axis(rotation) and revolving around the sun. As viewed from space, the Earth rotates counter-clockwise. This is called prograde rotation. Planets that spin clockwise are said to have retrograde rotation. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Volcanoes
The intense heat and pressures in the mantle turn solid rock into liquid magma. Magma comes out through the surface of the crust to form volcanoes. Three volcanoes categories are cinder cones, shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes. The ash and rock that is extruded by explosive volcanoes is called pyroclastic material. This volcanic mudflow is called a lahar. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 3
Weathering of rocks and soil formation
Weathering is a collection of natural processes that, over time, break large rock into smaller and smaller pieces. Rocks can be broken down by physical processes (called mechanical weathering) and chemical processes (called chemical weathering). Soil is a combination of decomposed rock and organic materials. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Work and machines
Work is the exertion of force through a distance. The formula for its calculation is: work =force x distance. For an example, if 5 newtons of force were applied for 5 meters, the amount of work done would be 25Nm. Mechanical advantage = output force/input force. For example, if a machine takes the force coming in and multiplies it three times, the mechanical advantage would be 3. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

MD.1.0. Skills and Processes: Students will demonstrate the thinking and acting inherent in the practice of science.

1.A.1. Constructing Knowledge: Design, analyze, or carry out simple investigations and formulate appropriate conclusions based on data obtained or provided.

1.A.1.a. Explain that scientists differ greatly in what phenomena they study and how they go about their work.
The Study of Heredity
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
Forces and Motion
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Elements and the periodic table
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Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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1.A.1.e. Explain that if more than one variable changes at the same time in an investigation, the outcome of the investigation may not be clearly attributable to any one of the variables.
The World of Life Science
Scientific inquiry is a process of designing and conducting scientific investigations including asking a question, completing an investigation, attempting to answer the question, and presenting the results to other. A conclusion is summing up the information from an investigation by either supporting the hypothesis or not. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
1.A.1.h. Use mathematics to interpret and communicate data.
Properties and States of Matter
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Energy: Forms and Changes
Energy can have many forms, including mechanical, thermal, electrical, chemical, nuclear and electromagnetic energy. Mechanical energy = potential energy + kinetic energy. Thermal energy is the energy of an objects created by the motion (kinetic energy) of its particles (molecules and atoms). Chemical energy is the potential energy that is stored in chemical bonds. Electrical energy is produced by the movement of charged particles called electrons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

1.B.1. Applying Evidence and Reasoning: Review data from a simple experiment, summarize the data, and construct a logical argument about the cause-and-effect relationships in the experiment.

1.B.1.d. Describe the reasoning that lead to the interpretation of data and conclusions drawn.
Properties and States of Matter
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Sound
Sound is the energy objects produce when they vibrate. Sound energy is a form of mechanical energy. The substance that the sound waves travel through is called the medium. A medium can be a solid, liquid or gas. In a longitudinal wave, the particles of the medium move back and forth, while the energy moves forward. Then the particles are pushed together, it is called compression. When the particles are spread apart, it is called rarefaction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
Elements and the periodic table
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1.C.1. Communicating Scientific Information: Develop explanations that explicitly link data from investigations conducted, selected readings and, when appropriate, contributions from historical discoveries.

1.C.1.a. Organize and present data in tables and graphs and identify relationships they reveal.
Properties and States of Matter
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
1.C.1.b. Interpret tables and graphs produced by others and describe in words the relationships they show.
Properties and States of Matter
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1.C.1.e. Explain how different models can be used to represent the same thing. What kind of a model to use and how complex it should be depend on its purpose. Choosing a useful model is one of the instances in which intuition and creativity come into play in science, mathematics, and engineering
The Study of Heredity
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Meiosis
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Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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1.D.3. Technology: Analyze the value and the limitations of different types of models in explaining real things and processes.

1.D.3.a. Explain that the kind of model to use and how complex it should be depends on its purpose and that it is possible to have different models used to represent the same thing.
The Study of Heredity
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
Meiosis
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Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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1.D.3.b. Explain, using examples that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly, or that are too vast to be changed deliberately, or that are potentially dangerous.
The Study of Heredity
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
Meiosis
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Atoms and Chemical Bonding
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2
1.D.3.c. Explain that models may sometimes mislead by suggesting characteristics that are not really shared with what is being modeled.
The Study of Heredity
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
Meiosis
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Atoms and Chemical Bonding
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2

MD.2.0. Earth/Space Science: Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the chemical and physical interactions (i.e., natural forces and cycles, transfer of energy) of the environment, Earth, and the universe that occur over time.

Introduction to earth science
The field of Geology includes a number of specialized disciplines including: Mineralogy - the study of minerals, Paleontology - the study of fossils, Petrology - the study of rocks, Geophysics - the study of the physics of the Earth and its atmosphere, Meteorology - the study of weather and weather prediction, Seismology - the study of earthquakes, and Volcanology - the study of volcanoes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Our Solar System
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2

MD.3.0. Life Science: The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time.

3.A.1. Diversity of Life: Compile evidence to verify the claim of biologists that the features of organisms connect or differentiate them-these include external and internal structures (features) and processes.

3.A.1.a. Provide examples and explain that organisms sorted into groups share similarities in external structures as well as similarities in internal anatomical structures and processes which can be used to infer the degree of relatedness among organisms: Vascular - non vascular plants; Closed - open circulatory systems; Asexual - sexual reproduction; Respiration (lungs-gills-skin); Digestion.
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant reproduction
An angiosperm is a plant that produces seeds within a fruit. Reproduction begins when the pollen from the anther is in contact with the stigma. Eventually the egg will be fertilized in the ovule that is in the ovary and turn from a zygote to an embryo inside the seed. The life cycle of angiosperms among the different species is very similar: Pollination, fertilization, and the development of fruit. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Introduction to Animals
Scientists have discovered about 1.2 million different species of animals on our planet. Planet Earth is home to 8.7 million species, scientists estimate. Animals have adapted to feed on different types of food. There are animals that eat only animals (carnivores), animals that eat only plants (herbivores), and animals that eat both plants and animals (omnivores). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
3.A.1.b. Identify general distinctions among organisms that support classifying some things as plants, some as animals, and some that do not fit neatly into either group: Animals consume food; Plants make food.
Protists and Fungi
What is a protist? The protist is the most diverse Kingdom of classified organisms on Earth. Protists are combined into the same Kingdom because they are all eukaryotes and they live in a liquid environment. There are protists that are unicellular and multicellular. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
Introduction to Animals
Scientists have discovered about 1.2 million different species of animals on our planet. Planet Earth is home to 8.7 million species, scientists estimate. Animals have adapted to feed on different types of food. There are animals that eat only animals (carnivores), animals that eat only plants (herbivores), and animals that eat both plants and animals (omnivores). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
3.A.1.c. Use analogies, models, or drawings to represent that animals and plants have a great variety of body plans and internal structures that define the way they live, grow, survive, and reproduce.
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant reproduction
An angiosperm is a plant that produces seeds within a fruit. Reproduction begins when the pollen from the anther is in contact with the stigma. Eventually the egg will be fertilized in the ovule that is in the ovary and turn from a zygote to an embryo inside the seed. The life cycle of angiosperms among the different species is very similar: Pollination, fertilization, and the development of fruit. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Introduction to Animals
Scientists have discovered about 1.2 million different species of animals on our planet. Planet Earth is home to 8.7 million species, scientists estimate. Animals have adapted to feed on different types of food. There are animals that eat only animals (carnivores), animals that eat only plants (herbivores), and animals that eat both plants and animals (omnivores). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles
Fish reproduce using external fertilization. External fertilization is when the female’s eggs are meeting with the male’s sperm outside of the female’s body. Three major groups are the jawless fish, cartilaginous fish, and bony fish. An amphibian is a vertebrate that is ectothermic. Most amphibians live the beginning of their lives in the water. A reptile is a vertebrate that is ectothermic and has scaly skin and a pair of lungs. Lizards, snakes, turtles, tortoises, and crocodiles are all examples of reptiles. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Birds and Mammals
A bird is an endothermic vertebrate that lays eggs, has feathers, and has a four- chambered heart. A mammal is an endothermic vertebrate that has skin covered with fur or hair, a four-chambered heart, a wide arrangement of teeth, and young that are born alive and feed by milk that was produced by the mother’s body. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

3.B.1. Cells: Gather and organize data to defend or argue the proposition that all living things are cellular (composed of cells) and that cells carry out the basic life functions.

3.B.1.a. Use microscopes or other magnifying instruments to observe, describe, and compare the cellular composition of different body tissues and organs in a variety of organisms (animals and plants).
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Introduction to Animals
Scientists have discovered about 1.2 million different species of animals on our planet. Planet Earth is home to 8.7 million species, scientists estimate. Animals have adapted to feed on different types of food. There are animals that eat only animals (carnivores), animals that eat only plants (herbivores), and animals that eat both plants and animals (omnivores). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Sponges, Cnidarians and Worms
Until recently, people thought that sponges were plants. The fact that they take in food puts them into the animal kingdom. When they are adults, they do not move. They attach themselves to a hard surface where they live out their lives. The structure of a sponge is very basic with some specialized tissue, but lacking organs and organ systems. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Mollusks, Arthropods and Echinoderms
FreeA molusk is an invertibrate that has an un-segmented, soft body that is almost always protected by outer shells. Snails, octopuses, clams, and oysters are all species of mollusks. Arthropods are invertebrates with external skeletons, segmented bodies, and appendages. Appendages are structures that are jointed and attached to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :7
Birds and Mammals
A bird is an endothermic vertebrate that lays eggs, has feathers, and has a four- chambered heart. A mammal is an endothermic vertebrate that has skin covered with fur or hair, a four-chambered heart, a wide arrangement of teeth, and young that are born alive and feed by milk that was produced by the mother’s body. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Bones, muscles, and skin
FreeThe human body works very smoothly carrying out its daily functions because it is organized. The human body has different levels of organization that consist of cells(the smallest), tissues, organs, and organ systems (the largest). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.B.1.b. Based on data from readings and designed investigations, cite evidence to illustrate that the life functions of multicellular organisms (plant and animal) are carried out within complex systems of different tissues, organs and cells: Extracting energy from food; Getting rid of wastes; Making raw materials.
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant reproduction
An angiosperm is a plant that produces seeds within a fruit. Reproduction begins when the pollen from the anther is in contact with the stigma. Eventually the egg will be fertilized in the ovule that is in the ovary and turn from a zygote to an embryo inside the seed. The life cycle of angiosperms among the different species is very similar: Pollination, fertilization, and the development of fruit. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Bones, muscles, and skin
FreeThe human body works very smoothly carrying out its daily functions because it is organized. The human body has different levels of organization that consist of cells(the smallest), tissues, organs, and organ systems (the largest). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.B.1.c. Based on research and examples from video technology explain that the repeated division of cells enables organisms to grow and make repairs.
Cell Reproduction
FreeThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells is called cell division. There are three stages of the cell cycle: interphase, mitosis, and cytokinesis. DNA stands for DeoxyriboNucleic Acid. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :8
Mitosis
Structures and functions of living organisms: Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organ Systems. Differentiate between the processes of mitosis and meiosis. Describe different cell parts and their functions. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :2
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Meiosis
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3.B.1.d. Collect data from investigations using single celled organisms, such as yeast or algae to explain that a single cell carries out all the basic life functions of a multicellular organism: Reproducing; Extracting energy from food; Getting rid of wastes.
Diversity of life
There are many characteristics that scientists use to determine if something is alive. The characteristics are very specific and are applicable to all of the different species that exist on our planet. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
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3.B.1.e. Based on data compiled from a number of lessons completed, take and defend a position on the statement 'The way in which cells function is the same in all organisms.'
Cells: The Basic Units of Life
The cell is the basic building blocks of all living organisms. There are many structures within the cell. The structures within the cell are known as organelles, which are all of the structures within the cell that carry out specific functions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4

3.B.2. Cells: Recognize and provide examples that human beings, like other organisms have complex body systems of cells, tissues and organs that interact to support an organism's growth and survival.

3.B.2.a. Describe and explain that the complex set of systems found in multicellular organisms are made up of different kinds of tissues and organs which are themselves composed of differentiated cells.
Bones, muscles, and skin
FreeThe human body works very smoothly carrying out its daily functions because it is organized. The human body has different levels of organization that consist of cells(the smallest), tissues, organs, and organ systems (the largest). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
The nervous system
The nervous system gathers information from inside and outside of the body, responds to the information that it gathers and helps to maintain homeostasis. There are three different types of neurons: sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. The three different types of neurons will work together to carry messages all throughout the nervous system. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Providing Fuel and Transportation
Food is stored and processed in your stomach, so that your body can gain access to the nutrients in the food. Your body relies on what you eat and drink to maintain healthy tissues and to generate the energy. There are six categories of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
3.B.2.b. Select several body systems and explain the role of cells, tissues and organs that effectively carry out a vital function for the organism, such as: Obtaining food and providing energy (digestive, circulatory, respiratory); Defense (nervous, endocrine, circulatory, muscular, skeletal, immune); Reproduction (reproductive, endocrine, circulatory); Waste removal (excretory, respiratory, circulatory); Breathing (respiratory, circulatory).
Bones, muscles, and skin
FreeThe human body works very smoothly carrying out its daily functions because it is organized. The human body has different levels of organization that consist of cells(the smallest), tissues, organs, and organ systems (the largest). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
Circulation and immunity
The circulatory system, otherwise known as the cardiovascular system, consists of the heart, blood vessels, and blood. The heart has two separate sides, the right and left, which are separated by the septum. The septum prevents oxygen-rich blood from mixing with oxygen-poor blood. The valve prevents blood from flowing backwards in the one-way direction of the circulatory system. There are three types of blood vessels in the human body: arteries, capillaries, and veins. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :7
Respiration and excretion
Air travels through the nose, pharynx, trachea, and the bronchi within the lungs. Oxygen is gained by the respiratory system and glucose is gained from the digestive system. Both the oxygen and glucose are transported around the body by the circulatory system. With every breath, we pull oxygen out of the atmosphere. The atmosphere consists of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% other gases, so the air that we breathe is not all taken into the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
The nervous system
The nervous system gathers information from inside and outside of the body, responds to the information that it gathers and helps to maintain homeostasis. There are three different types of neurons: sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. The three different types of neurons will work together to carry messages all throughout the nervous system. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
The Endocrine system and Reproduction
The endocrine system controls long-term and short-term changes of the body and many of the daily activities of the body. The system is made up of glands, which are organs that produce and secrete chemicals. Endocrine glands release chemicals called hormones into the bloodstream, which will then be carried throughout the body. The hypothalamus is a small part of the brain that links the nervous system and the endocrine system together. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Providing Fuel and Transportation
Food is stored and processed in your stomach, so that your body can gain access to the nutrients in the food. Your body relies on what you eat and drink to maintain healthy tissues and to generate the energy. There are six categories of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
3.B.2.c. Develop a response that explains the meaning of the statement, 'The specialization of cells serves the operation of the organs, and the organs serve the needs of the cells.'
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Providing Fuel and Transportation
Food is stored and processed in your stomach, so that your body can gain access to the nutrients in the food. Your body relies on what you eat and drink to maintain healthy tissues and to generate the energy. There are six categories of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
3.B.2.d. Investigate ways in which the various organs and tissues function to serve the needs of cells for food, air, and waste removal.
Bones, muscles, and skin
FreeThe human body works very smoothly carrying out its daily functions because it is organized. The human body has different levels of organization that consist of cells(the smallest), tissues, organs, and organ systems (the largest). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :6
Respiration and excretion
Air travels through the nose, pharynx, trachea, and the bronchi within the lungs. Oxygen is gained by the respiratory system and glucose is gained from the digestive system. Both the oxygen and glucose are transported around the body by the circulatory system. With every breath, we pull oxygen out of the atmosphere. The atmosphere consists of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% other gases, so the air that we breathe is not all taken into the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

3.C.1. Genetics: Explain the ways that genetic information is passed from parent to offspring in different organisms.

3.C.1.a. Investigate and explain that in some kinds of organisms, all the genes come from a single parent, whereas in organisms that have sexes, typically half of the genes come from each parent.
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
3.C.1.b. Investigate and explain that in sexual reproduction, a single specialized cell from a female (egg) merges with a specialized cell from a male (sperm) and the fertilized egg now has genetic information from each parent, that multiplies to form the complete organism composed of about a trillion cells, each of which contains the same genetic information.
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Meiosis
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3.C.1.c. Investigate organisms that reproduce asexually to identify what traits they receive from the parent.
Pond Microlife
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Chromosomes, Genes and DNA
Chromosomes are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the hereditary material in humans and most of other organisms. Specific sections of the DNA are called genes. Each gene provides the cell with different information. Each chromosome is made up of many genes. There are about about 100000 genes found on human chromosomes. A gene is made up of a particular sequence of DNA bases. This sequence acts as a code for a protein. The production of different proteins determines the trait (inherited characteristic) of an organism. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
The Study of Heredity
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
3.C.1.e. Identify evidence to support the idea that there is greater variation among offspring of organisms that reproduce sexually than among those that reproduce asexually.
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Meiosis
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3.E.1. Flow of Matter and Energy: Explain that the transfer and transformation of matter and energy links organisms to one another and to their physical setting.

3.E.1.a. Cite evidence from research and observations that food provides molecules that serve as fuel and building materials for all organisms.
Providing Fuel and Transportation
Food is stored and processed in your stomach, so that your body can gain access to the nutrients in the food. Your body relies on what you eat and drink to maintain healthy tissues and to generate the energy. There are six categories of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.E.1.b. Cite evidence from research and observations that organisms that eat plants or animals break down what they have consumed (food) to produce the materials and energy they need to survive or store for later use.
Cell Processes
Nucleic acids are organic molecules that contain the instructions for all of the cell functions. They are made from carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus. There are two types of nucleic acids. DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of an organism, and RNA (ribonucleic acid), the important material in producing proteins within the cell. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.E.1.c. Investigate and describe the processes that enable plants to use the energy from light to make sugars (food) from carbon dioxide and water.
Introduction to Plants
All plants are eukaryotes, with numerous cells, and they are all autotrophs, use photosynthesis to make food. Plants require sunlight to make food. : Plants have adapted to living on land by having the ability to obtain water and other nutrients from the soil. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Plant Processes
Photosynthesis is a process powered by sunlight that uses carbon dioxide and water to produce oxygen and food. The process requires six molecules of water and six molecules of carbon dioxide. These molecules undergo chemical changes and oxygen and sugars like glucose are produced. The oxygen is let go through the stomata and the sugars are used to power cell functions. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Pond Microlife
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.E.1.e. Ask and seek answers to questions about the fact that transfer of matter between organisms continues indefinitely because organisms are decomposed after death to return food materials to the environment.
Ecosystems, food chains and food webs
Understanding food chains and food webs requires understanding the flow of energy and food sources among living things on Earth. A food chain represents a series of organisms connected by where they obtain their energy. A food web is made up of many different food chains in an ecosystem. A food web helps us understand how organisms are interrelated within an ecosystem. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
3.E.1.f. Provide evidence that supports the premise 'In the flow of matter system the total amount of matter remains constant even though its form and location change': Carbon cycle; Nitrogen (cycle); Food chains and food webs.
Ecosystems, food chains and food webs
Understanding food chains and food webs requires understanding the flow of energy and food sources among living things on Earth. A food chain represents a series of organisms connected by where they obtain their energy. A food web is made up of many different food chains in an ecosystem. A food web helps us understand how organisms are interrelated within an ecosystem. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Food Chains and Food Webs
Biological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Photosynthesis and Respiration
What is Photosynthesis? Photosynthesis is the process that green plants use to capture energy from the Sun and convert it to food. Plants produce oxygen and food in the form of sugar during the process of Photosynthesis. It occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when light is captured by the chlorophyll pigments in the leaves and converted to energy in the chloroplast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

MD.4.0. Chemistry: Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the composition, structure, and interactions of matter in order to support the predictability of structure and energy transformations.

4.A.1. Structure of Matter: Cite evidence to support the fact that all matter is made up of atoms, which are far too small to see directly through a microscope.

4.A.1.a. Recognize and describe that the atoms of each element are alike but different from atoms of other elements.
Elements and the periodic table
Elements are the purest form of matter and can not be broken down into any other substance by either a physical or chemical change. There are about 114 elements and they are organized on a modern Periodic Table of the Elements. The Elements are organized by their atomic numbers from top to bottom and left to right. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Properties and States of Matter
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Elements and the periodic table
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4.A.1.b. Recognize and describe that different arrangements of atoms into groups compose all substances.
Elements and the periodic table
Elements are the purest form of matter and can not be broken down into any other substance by either a physical or chemical change. There are about 114 elements and they are organized on a modern Periodic Table of the Elements. The Elements are organized by their atomic numbers from top to bottom and left to right. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Chemical bonding
FreeChemical bonding involves only an atom's outermost electrons. These electrons are called valence electrons and because they have more energy than other electrons, they tend to be found further away from the nucleus. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Properties and States of Matter
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Elements and the periodic table
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Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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4.A.1.c. Provide evidence from the periodic table, investigations and research to demonstrate that elements in the following groups have similar properties: Highly reactive metals, such as magnesium and sodium; Less-reactive metals, such as gold and silver; Highly reactive non-metals, such as chlorine, fluorine, and oxygen; Almost non-reactive gases, such as helium and neon.
Elements and the periodic table
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Atoms and Chemical Bonding
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4.A.1.d. Provide examples to illustrate that elements are substances that do not breakdown into smaller parts during normal investigations involving heating, exposure to electric current or reactions with acids.
Elements and the periodic table
Elements are the purest form of matter and can not be broken down into any other substance by either a physical or chemical change. There are about 114 elements and they are organized on a modern Periodic Table of the Elements. The Elements are organized by their atomic numbers from top to bottom and left to right. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Properties and States of Matter
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Elements and the periodic table
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2
4.A.1.e. Cite evidence to explain that all living and non-living things can be broken down to a set of known elements.
Elements and the periodic table
Elements are the purest form of matter and can not be broken down into any other substance by either a physical or chemical change. There are about 114 elements and they are organized on a modern Periodic Table of the Elements. The Elements are organized by their atomic numbers from top to bottom and left to right. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Properties and States of Matter
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Elements and the periodic table
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :2

MD.6.0. Environmental Science: Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective.

6.A.1. Natural Resources and Human Needs: Recognize and explain the impact of a changing human population on the use of natural resources and on environmental quality.

6.A.1.a. Based on data identify and describe the positive and negative impacts of an increasing human population on the use of natural resources
Earth`s Climate
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

6.B.1. Environmental Issues: Recognize and describe that environmental changes can have local, regional, and global consequences.

6.B.1.a. Identify and describe a local, regional, or global environmental issue.
Earth's Fresh Water
Fresh water moves over the surface by an interconnected system of streams and rivers. Small streams that feed water into larger rivers are called tributaries. Rivers are closely interconnected and flow from higher to lower elevations where the water collects in larger and larger rivers until it ultimately flows into the oceans. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.B.1.b. Identify and describe that different individuals or groups are affected by an issue in different ways.
Earth's Fresh Water
Fresh water moves over the surface by an interconnected system of streams and rivers. Small streams that feed water into larger rivers are called tributaries. Rivers are closely interconnected and flow from higher to lower elevations where the water collects in larger and larger rivers until it ultimately flows into the oceans. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource: