Maryland Standards for Sixth Grade English Language Arts

AnalogiesWhat is an Analogy? An analogy is a comparison of two different things that have something particular in common. An analogy is a comparison based on a similarity. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Grammar/SpellingFreePlural Nouns. Plural words are words that mean MORE than one of something. Possessive Nouns. Possessive nouns show ownership. Homonyms. Homonyms are words that sound the same but have different meanings. Read more...iWorksheets: 7Study Guides: 1
Literary DevicesSimile, metaphor, and personification. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Literary TechniquesRecognize symbolism, alliteration, flashback, and foreshadowing. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Personal ExperienceUse information from other subject areas and personal experience to express opinions and judgments. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Prefix/SuffixA prefix is a group of letters added to the beginning of a root word or another prefix. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Root WordsA root is the basic element of a word. It is the foundation on which the meaning of the word is built. Prefixes and suffixes are added to root words to form new words. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesThe Four Types of Sentences are: Declarative sentence, Imperative sentence, Interrogative sentence, Exclamatory sentence. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Syllables/Spelling PatternsWhat is a Syllable? A syllable is a single sound heard when saying a word out loud. All words have at least one syllable. What are Spelling Patterns? Selling patterns are a pair or group of letters that can be found in many words: bead, meat, read, lead, bread, dead, head, instead, great, break. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Title/Author of Well Known LiteratureTitles and authors of well known literature. Read more...iWorksheets: 3

MD.1.0. General Reading Processes

1.C. Students will read orally with accuracy and expression at a rate that sounds like speech.

1.C.1. Read orally at an appropriate rate
1.C.1.a. Read familiar text at a rate that is conversational and consistent
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.C.2. Read grade-level text with both high accuracy and appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression
1.C.2.a. Apply knowledge of word structures and patterns to read with automaticity
Decoding StrategiesAnalogy, word structure, syntax, and semantics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.b. Demonstrate appropriate use of phrasing
1.C.2.b.2. Use punctuation cues to guide meaning and expression
Punctuation for ComprehensionUse knowledge of punctuation to assist in comprehension. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.c. Increase sight words read fluently
High Frequency Words IHigh frequency words are words that you may come across frequently when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words IIWhat are High Frequency Words? High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words IHigh frequency words are quite simply those words which occur most frequently in written material, for example, "and", "the", "as" and "it". Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words IIHIGH FREQUENCY WORDS II. Words that you may see often when reading are called high frequency words. As a 6th grader, you should be familiar with how to pronounce and spell the following high frequency words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.D. Students will use a variety of strategies and opportunities to understand word meaning and to increase vocabulary.

1.D.1. Develop and apply vocabulary through exposure to a variety of texts
1.D.1.a. Acquire new vocabulary through listening to, independently reading, and discussing a variety of literary and informational texts
Content VocabularyDetermine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. <br>Gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.1.b. Discuss words and word meanings daily as they are encountered in text, instruction, and conversation
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.2. Apply a conceptual understanding of new words
1.D.2.b. Explain relationships between and among words
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.3. Understand, acquire, and use new vocabulary
1.D.3.a. Use context to determine the meanings of words
Context CluesContext clues are clues found in a text that may help you figure out the definition of a word that you do not know. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
VocabularyYour vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context CluesThe five types of Context Clues are: Example Clues (group of items in a category), Synonym Clues (similar meaning is in the text), Antonym Clues (opposite meaning is in the text), Direct Definition Clues (meaning is stated in the sentence) and Appositive Clues (meaning is set off by commas). Read more...iWorksheets :3
VocabularyWhat is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Vocabulary What Is Vocabulary? Vocabulary refers to a collection of words. Our English vocabulary developed in a variety of ways: Names of people and places provide some English words. Rudolf Diesel invented an engine that is named after him. The first letters of words, called acronyms, provide new words for our language. Shortened words provide some new English words. The word hamburger provides the shortened word burger. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.D.3.b. Use word structure to determine the meaning of words
Decoding StrategiesAnalogy, word structure, syntax, and semantics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.3.c. Use resources to confirm definitions and gather further information about words
Using a ThesaurusUse a thesaurus for synonyms and antonyms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Dictionary SkillsA dictionary is a useful tool in the study of words. Words are listed alphabetically in a dictionary so that they are easy to find. We look up words in a dictionary to find out about the word, including how to use it, what it means, and other important attributes of the word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.D.3.d. Use new vocabulary in speaking and writing to gain and extend content knowledge and clarify expression
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3

1.E. Students will use a variety of strategies to understand what they read (construct meaning).

1.E.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills through exposure to a variety of print and non-print texts, including traditional print and electronic texts
1.E.1.a. Listen to critically, read, and discuss texts representing diversity in content, culture, authorship, and perspective, including areas such as race, gender, disability, religion, and socio-economic background
Identify PerspectivesPerspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.2. Use strategies to prepare for reading (before reading)
1.E.2.b. Set a purpose for reading the text
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.2.c. Make predictions and ask questions about the text
Making PredictionsWhen you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making PredictionsWhat is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.2.d. Make connections to the text from prior knowledge and experiences
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.3. Use strategies to make meaning from text (during reading)
1.E.3.a. Reread the difficult parts slowly and carefully
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.b. Use own words to restate the difficult part
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.c. Read on and revisit the difficult part
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.d. Skim the text to search for connections between and among ideas
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.3.e. Make, confirm, or adjust predictions
Making PredictionsWhen you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making PredictionsWhat is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.3.f. Periodically summarize while reading
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.g. Periodically paraphrase important ideas or information
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.j. Explain personal connections to the ideas or information in the text
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4. Use strategies to demonstrate understanding of the text (after reading)
1.E.4.a. Identify and explain the main idea
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.b. Identify and explain what is directly stated in the text
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.c. Identify and explain what is not directly stated in the text by drawing inferences
Drawing ConclusionsFreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied InformationCite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
InferencesInferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing InferencesAn inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing InferencesWhat are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsA conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsWhat is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied InformationDraw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.d. Draw conclusions or make generalizations about the text
Drawing ConclusionsFreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied InformationCite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
InferencesInferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing InferencesAn inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing InferencesWhat are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsA conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsWhat is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied InformationDraw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.e. Confirm, refute, or make predictions and form new ideas
Making PredictionsWhen you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making PredictionsWhat is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.4.f. Paraphrase the main idea
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.g. Summarize
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.h. Connect the text to prior knowledge or personal experience
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.2.0. Comprehension of Informational Text

2.A.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills by reading a variety of self-selected and assigned print and non-print informational texts, including electronic media

2.A.1.a. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of nonfiction materials such as textbooks, appropriate reference materials, research and historical documents, personal narratives, diaries, and journals, biographies, newspapers, letters, articles, web sites and other online materials, other appropriate content-specific texts to gain information and content knowledge
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Different GenresThe four main literary genres are poetry, fiction (Literary Fiction, Speculative Fiction, Science Fiction, Fantasy,...), nonfiction, and drama. Define characteristics of different genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
2.A.1.c. Select and read to gain information from personal interest materials such as brochures, books, magazines, cookbooks, catalogs, and web sites
Text FeaturesA map is a visual representation of a section of land. A map has several features to help readers interpret information: compass, index, scale, symbols, legend. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.2. Identify and use text features to facilitate understanding of informational texts

2.A.2.a. Use print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, underlining, and other appropriate content-specific texts
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.2.b. Use graphic aids such as illustrations and pictures, photographs, drawings, sketches, cartoons, maps (key, scale, legend, graphs, charts/tables, and diagrams, other graphic aids encountered in informational texts
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reading GraphicsWhat Is a Graphic? A visual aid that helps the reader understand information more easily is known as a graphic. Examples: Graphs-circle graphs, bar graphs, line graphs, picture graphs, Time lines, Illustrations, Photographs, Charts, Diagrams, Political cartoons, Maps. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.2.c. Use informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, bulleted lists, footnoted words, pronunciation key, transition words, end notes, works cited, other informational aids encountered in informational texts
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.2.d. Use organizational aids such as titles, chapter titles, headings, subheadings, tables of contents, numbered steps, glossaries, indices, transition words, other organizational aids encountered in organizational texts
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of a BookBooks contain several informational and important parts, including: Table of Contents, Index and Glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Parts of a BookBooks may contain several parts that help the readers find information quickly and easily: Tables of Contents, Index, Glossary, headings, graphic organizers, charts, bold or italicized text. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.2.f. Identify and explain the contributions of text features to support the main idea of the text
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

2.A.3. Develop and apply knowledge of organizational structure of informational text to facilitate understanding

2.A.3.a. Identify and analyze the organizational patterns of texts such as sequential and/or chronological order, cause/effect, problem/solution, similarities/differences, description, main idea and supporting details, transition or signal words and phrases that indicate the organizational pattern
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose IdentificationTopic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.3.b. Explain how the organizational pattern clarifies and reinforces meaning and supports the author's/text's purpose
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAn author writes for many reasons, such as to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAuthor’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Author's PurposeThe Author's Purpose is the reason that the author wrote the piece. If the author's purpose is to inform, he/she plans to teach the reader. If the author's purpose is to entertain, he/she plans to amuse the reader. If the author's purpose is to persuade, he/she plans to convince the reader to believe his/her point of view. If the author's purpose is to create a mood, he/she plans to use much description to stir emotions in the reader. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

2.A.4. Determine and analyze important ideas and messages in informational texts

2.A.4.a. Identify and explain the author's/text's purpose and intended audience
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAn author writes for many reasons, such as to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAuthor’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Author's PurposeThe Author's Purpose is the reason that the author wrote the piece. If the author's purpose is to inform, he/she plans to teach the reader. If the author's purpose is to entertain, he/she plans to amuse the reader. If the author's purpose is to persuade, he/she plans to convince the reader to believe his/her point of view. If the author's purpose is to create a mood, he/she plans to use much description to stir emotions in the reader. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.4.b. Identify and explain the author's opinion
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.c. State and support main ideas and messages
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.d. Summarize or paraphrase
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.e. Identify and explain information not related to the main idea
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose IdentificationTopic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.f. Explain relationships between and among ideas such as comparison/contrast, cause/effect, sequence/chronology
Cause and EffectFreeCause and effect is a relationship between events or things, where one is the result of the other or others. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause/Effect, Fact/OpinionCause and effect refers to the relationship between two events. A cause is why something happens and an effect is what happened as a result of that cause. A fact is information that is known to be true. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause and EffectCause and effect refers to the relationship between two events or occurrences. To put it simply, it is when one thing causes something else to happen. A cause is WHY something happens. An effect is WHAT happened as a result of something else. To find the cause, ask yourself: Why did this happen? To find the effect, ask yourself: What happened? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.4.g. Synthesize ideas from text
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.h. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion
Fact/Opinion/ExaggerationRecognize fact, opinion, and exaggeration. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause/Effect, Fact/OpinionCause and effect refers to the relationship between two events. A cause is why something happens and an effect is what happened as a result of that cause. A fact is information that is known to be true. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Fact/OpinionFreeA fact is information that is known to be true; it is a certainty. A fact does not change from person to person. An opinion is a personal belief or idea. People do not always have the same beliefs or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Opinion/Exaggeration/Missing InfoExaggeration is a representation of something in an excessive manner. It is the opposite of minimisation. Identify missing and irrelevant information. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.4.i. Explain how someone might use the text
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.j. Connect the text to prior knowledge or experience
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

2.A.5. Analyze purposeful use of language

2.A.5.b. Analyze specific language choices that create tone
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.5.c. Analyze the effect of repetition of words and phrases on meaning
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Literary DevicesWhat is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. What is a Hyperbole? Hyperbole is an exaggerated comparison. What is a Simile? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Literary Elements/Poetic DevicesA literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.6. Read critically to evaluate informational text

2.A.6.a. Explain whether the text fulfills the reading purpose
Reading ProcessWhat Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.6.b. Analyze changes or additions to the structure and text features that would make the text easier to understand
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.6.d. Determine and explain whether or not the author's argument or position is presented fairly
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.6.e. Identify and explain information not included in the text
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose IdentificationTopic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.3.0. Comprehension of Literary Text

3.A.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills by reading and analyzing a variety of self-selected and assigned literary texts including print and non-print

3.A.1.a. Listen to critically, read, and discuss a variety of literary texts representing diverse cultures, perspectives, ethnicities, and time periods
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Identify PerspectivesPerspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.1.b. Listen to critically, read, and discuss a variety of literary forms and genres
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.2. Analyze text features to facilitate understanding of literary texts

3.A.2.a. Identify and explain how organizational aids such as the title of the book, story, poem, or play, titles of chapters, subtitles, subheadings contribute to meaning
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.2.b. Identify and explain how graphic aids such as pictures and illustrations, punctuation, print features contribute to meaning
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reading GraphicsWhat Is a Graphic? A visual aid that helps the reader understand information more easily is known as a graphic. Examples: Graphs-circle graphs, bar graphs, line graphs, picture graphs, Time lines, Illustrations, Photographs, Charts, Diagrams, Political cartoons, Maps. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.2.c. Identify and explain how informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, bulleted lists, footnoted words, pronunciation keys, transition words, end notes, works cited, other information aids encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.2.d. Identify and explain how print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, underlining, other print features encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

3.A.3. Analyze elements of narrative texts to facilitate understanding and interpretation

3.A.3.a. Identify and distinguish among types of narrative texts such as short stories, folklore, realistic fiction, science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, essays, biographies, autobiographies, personal narratives, plays, poetry
Different GenresThe four main literary genres are poetry, fiction (Literary Fiction, Speculative Fiction, Science Fiction, Fantasy,...), nonfiction, and drama. Define characteristics of different genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.3.b. Analyze the events of the plot
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaWhat is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.c. Analyze details that provide information about the setting, the mood created by the setting, and ways in which the setting affects characters
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.d. Analyze characterization
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.e. Analyze relationships between and among characters, setting, and events
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main IdeaWhat is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.f. Identify and explain how the actions of the character(s) affect the plot
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main IdeaWhat is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.g. Analyze internal and/or external conflicts that motivate characters and those that advance the plot
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main IdeaWhat is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.h. Identify and explain the author's approach to issues of time in a narrative
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.4. Analyze elements of poetry to facilitate understanding and interpretation

3.A.4.a. Use structural features to distinguish among types of poems such as haiku, form/shape poetry, cinquain, etc.
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.b. Identify and explain the meaning of words, lines, and stanzas
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.c. Identify and explain how sound elements of poetry contribute to meaning
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.d. Identify and explain other poetic elements such as setting, mood, tone, etc., that contribute to meaning
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.5. Analyze elements of drama to facilitate understanding

3.A.5.a. Use structural features to distinguish among types of plays
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
3.A.5.b. Identify and explain the action of scenes and acts
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
3.A.5.c. Identify and explain how stage directions create character and movement
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
3.A.5.d. Identify and explain stage directions and dialogue that help to create character
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

3.A.6. Determine important ideas and messages in literary texts

3.A.6.a. Analyze main ideas and universal themes
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.6.b. Analyze similar themes across multiple texts
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.6.d. Summarize
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.6.e. Identify and explain personal connections to the text
Interpret TextInterpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.7. Analyze the author's purposeful use of language

3.A.7.b. Analyze words and phrases that create tone
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.7.c. Identify and explain figurative language that contributes to meaning
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.7.e. Analyze how repetition and exaggeration contribute to meaning
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Literary DevicesWhat is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. What is a Hyperbole? Hyperbole is an exaggerated comparison. What is a Simile? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Opinion/Exaggeration/Missing InfoExaggeration is a representation of something in an excessive manner. It is the opposite of minimisation. Identify missing and irrelevant information. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements/Poetic DevicesA literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.8. Read critically to evaluate literary texts

3.A.8.a. Determine and explain the plausibility of the characters' actions and the plot
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsSetting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main IdeaWhat is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative TextWhat is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.8.b. Identify and explain questions left unanswered by the text
Making PredictionsWhen you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making PredictionsWhat is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.8.c. Identify and explain the relationship between a literary text and its historical and/or social context
Literary GenresA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Identify PerspectivesPerspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.8.d. Identify and explain the relationship between the structure and the purpose of the text
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAn author writes for many reasons, such as to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Author's Purpose/Point of ViewAuthor’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Author's PurposeThe Author's Purpose is the reason that the author wrote the piece. If the author's purpose is to inform, he/she plans to teach the reader. If the author's purpose is to entertain, he/she plans to amuse the reader. If the author's purpose is to persuade, he/she plans to convince the reader to believe his/her point of view. If the author's purpose is to create a mood, he/she plans to use much description to stir emotions in the reader. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

MD.4.0. Writing

4.A.2. Compose oral, written, and visual presentations that express personal ideas, inform, and persuade

4.A.2.b. Describe in prose and/or poetic forms to clarify, extend, or elaborate on ideas by using vivid language such as imagery, figurative language, and sound elements
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.2.c. Compose to inform using relevant support and a variety of appropriate organizational structures and signal words within a paragraph
Signal/Transitional WordsSignal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SequencingWhat is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Extraneous DetailWhat are Extraneous Details? Extraneous details are details that are irrelevant to the main idea of a paragraph. Extraneous details are details that are not necessary to include in a paragraph because they are not related to the theme of a paragraph. Extraneous details should not be included in your writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.A.2.d. Compose to persuade by supporting, modifying, or disagreeing with a position, using effective rhetorical strategies
4.A.2.d.1. Support, modify, or disagree with a position and generate convincing evidence to support it
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.2.d.4. Use authoritative citations
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.A.3. Compose texts using the revising and editing strategies of effective writers and speakers

4.A.3.a. Revise texts for clarity, completeness, and effectiveness
4.A.3.a.2. Clarify meaning through the placement of antecedents, modifiers, connectors, and transitional devices
Signal/Transitional WordsSignal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SequencingWhat is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Modifiers-AdjectivesWhat is an Adjective? A word that describes a noun or a pronoun is called an adjective. Modify means to change. Since adjectives change the meanings of nouns and pronouns, adjectives are also called modifiers. In the following sentence, intelligent is a predicate adjective. The word intelligent describes the word sister and follows the predicate, is: My sister is intelligent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.A.3.a.5. Maintain consistent person, number and tense
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.A.4. Identify how language choices in writing and speaking affect thoughts and feelings

4.A.4.a. Use precise word choice, formal to informal, based on audience, situation, or purpose
Informal LanguageRecognize jargon, colloquialisms, informal vocabulary, and email conventions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Informal LanguageInformal language is mainly used between people who know each other well, or in relaxed and unofficial contexts. Informal language is mostly used while talking. we can also use informal language when we are writing such as writing a postcard to a family member or sending a text message to a friend or some business correspondences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.4.b. Consider the connotative and/or denotative meanings of words when selecting vocabulary
Vocabulary What Is Vocabulary? Vocabulary refers to a collection of words. Our English vocabulary developed in a variety of ways: Names of people and places provide some English words. Rudolf Diesel invented an engine that is named after him. The first letters of words, called acronyms, provide new words for our language. Shortened words provide some new English words. The word hamburger provides the shortened word burger. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

4.A.5. Assess the effectiveness of choice of details, organizational pattern, word choice, syntax, use of figurative language, and rhetorical devices in the student's own composing

4.A.5.c. Evaluate the use of transitions in a text
Signal/Transitional WordsSignal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SequencingWhat is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

4.A.7. Locate, retrieve and use information from various sources to accomplish a purpose

4.A.7.c. Use appropriate note taking procedures, organizational strategies, and proper documentation of sources of information
4.A.7.c.2. Appropriate strategies for organizing source information or notes
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.7.c.3. Information to include or exclude when using a note taking method
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.7.c.4. Advantages, disadvantages, or limitations of a given strategy or procedure for recording or organizing information
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.7.d. Synthesize information from two or more sources to fulfill a self-selected or given purpose
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.7.e. Use a recognized format to credit sources when paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting to avoid plagiarism
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.5.0. Controlling Language

5.A.1. Recognize elements of grammar in personal and academic reading

GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UsageWhat Is Usage? The way in which the English language is used is known as usage. To speak and write our language properly, certain rules must be followed. Examples: a and an: Use a before a word that starts with a consonant sound and an before a word that has a vowel sound (a cartoon, an orangutan). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.A.2. Recognize, recall, and use grammar concepts and skills to strengthen control of oral and written language

5.A.2.a. Recognize the meaning, position, form, and function of words when identifying grammatical concepts such as indefinite pronouns, perfect verb tenses, conjunctive adverbs, and correlative conjunctions
NounsRecognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly. <br> Uses subject vs. object pronouns correctly (e.g., I vs. me). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
VocabularyYour vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
VocabularyWhat is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.A.2.b. Combine sentences using knowledge of subjects and predicates, logical placement of modifiers, and logical coordination, subordination, and sequencing of ideas
Modifiers-AdjectivesWhat is an Adjective? A word that describes a noun or a pronoun is called an adjective. Modify means to change. Since adjectives change the meanings of nouns and pronouns, adjectives are also called modifiers. In the following sentence, intelligent is a predicate adjective. The word intelligent describes the word sister and follows the predicate, is: My sister is intelligent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.A.2.d. Compose simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences using independent and dependent clauses, transitions, conjunctions, and appropriate punctuation to connect ideas
Signal/Transitional WordsSignal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SequencingWhat is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Kinds of Sentences There are four different kinds of sentences: A declarative sentence makes a statement. An exclamatory sentence expresses a strong emotion. An interrogative sentence asks a question. An imperative sentence gives a command. Example: A declarative sentence: My dog is a West Highland white terrier. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
PunctuationWhat Are Punctuation Marks? Punctuation marks are symbols to help readers understand how to read sentences. Examples: Period-ending marks, abbreviations; Question mark-ending marks; Exclamation point-ending marks; Comma-separating items or words, direct address, dates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

5.B.1. Recognize examples of conventional USAge in personal and academic reading

GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UsageWhat Is Usage? The way in which the English language is used is known as usage. To speak and write our language properly, certain rules must be followed. Examples: a and an: Use a before a word that starts with a consonant sound and an before a word that has a vowel sound (a cartoon, an orangutan). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.B.2. Comprehend and apply standard English USAge in oral and written language

5.B.2.a. Apply appropriate subject/verb agreement such as with collective nouns, indefinite pronouns, and inverted word order
NounsRecognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly. <br> Uses subject vs. object pronouns correctly (e.g., I vs. me). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Subject and Verb AgreementWhat Is Subject and Verb Agreement? Whether a word is singular or plural is called its number. In a sentence, the subject and the verb must agree in number. Singular subject = singular verb; Plural subject = plural verb. The subject of a sentence is not found in the prepositional phrase. The coach, along with the soccer players, is celebrating. The subject of the sentence is coach, not soccer players, so the subject is singular. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.B.2.b. Apply consistent and appropriate use of the principal parts of regular and irregular verbs; person, number, and case of pronouns; pronoun/antecedent agreement; and degrees of comparison of modifiers
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
VerbsWhat is a Verb? A Verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. The majority of verbs are regular and consistently use -ed and -en to form their simple past tense and past participles. Many verbs are irregular and follow no consistent pattern in creating their -ed and/or -en forms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Modifiers-AdjectivesWhat is an Adjective? A word that describes a noun or a pronoun is called an adjective. Modify means to change. Since adjectives change the meanings of nouns and pronouns, adjectives are also called modifiers. In the following sentence, intelligent is a predicate adjective. The word intelligent describes the word sister and follows the predicate, is: My sister is intelligent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
VerbsWhat Is a Verb? A verb is the part of speech that expresses action or state of being. Examples: There are two types of verbs: action verbs (ran, jumped) and linking verbs (is, was). A linking verb is also called a verb of being. A transitive verb has an object, while an intransitive verb does not have an object. A verb phrase is made up of a verb and one or more helping verbs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.B.2.c. Recognize and correct common USAge errors such as misplaced modifiers; incorrect use of verbs; double negatives; and commonly confused words such as accept - except
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
VerbsWhat is a Verb? A Verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. The majority of verbs are regular and consistently use -ed and -en to form their simple past tense and past participles. Many verbs are irregular and follow no consistent pattern in creating their -ed and/or -en forms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Modifiers-AdjectivesWhat is an Adjective? A word that describes a noun or a pronoun is called an adjective. Modify means to change. Since adjectives change the meanings of nouns and pronouns, adjectives are also called modifiers. In the following sentence, intelligent is a predicate adjective. The word intelligent describes the word sister and follows the predicate, is: My sister is intelligent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Parts of SpeechA part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
UsageWhat Is Usage? The way in which the English language is used is known as usage. To speak and write our language properly, certain rules must be followed. Examples: a and an: Use a before a word that starts with a consonant sound and an before a word that has a vowel sound (a cartoon, an orangutan). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
VerbsWhat Is a Verb? A verb is the part of speech that expresses action or state of being. Examples: There are two types of verbs: action verbs (ran, jumped) and linking verbs (is, was). A linking verb is also called a verb of being. A transitive verb has an object, while an intransitive verb does not have an object. A verb phrase is made up of a verb and one or more helping verbs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.C.1. Explain and justify the purpose of mechanics to make and clarify meaning in academic and personal reading and writing

PunctuationWhat Are Punctuation Marks? Punctuation marks are symbols to help readers understand how to read sentences. Examples: Period-ending marks, abbreviations; Question mark-ending marks; Exclamation point-ending marks; Comma-separating items or words, direct address, dates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

5.C.2. Apply standard English punctuation and capitalization in written language

5.C.2.a. Use commas and semicolons correctly such as in a compound sentence
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PunctuationWhat is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Punctuation/CapitalizationWhere do COMMAS go? Commas in a series, Commas in dates, Commas in an address, Commas in a friendly letters. Where Does the APOSTROPHE go in a Contraction? Where Does a PERIOD go in an Abbreviation? Where do QUOTATION MARKS go in Written Text? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.C.2.b. Use parentheses and dashes correctly
PunctuationWhat Are Punctuation Marks? Punctuation marks are symbols to help readers understand how to read sentences. Examples: Period-ending marks, abbreviations; Question mark-ending marks; Exclamation point-ending marks; Comma-separating items or words, direct address, dates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.C.2.c. Use appropriate punctuation for special formats such as e-mails, bulleted lists, letters, memos, citations, and outlines
PunctuationWhat Are Punctuation Marks? Punctuation marks are symbols to help readers understand how to read sentences. Examples: Period-ending marks, abbreviations; Question mark-ending marks; Exclamation point-ending marks; Comma-separating items or words, direct address, dates. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.C.2.d. Use a colon to introduce a list
PunctuationWhat is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

5.D.1. Recognize conventional spelling in and through personal and academic reading

SpellingAre There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.2. Apply conventional spelling in written language

5.D.2.a. Use conventional spelling in personal writing
SpellingAre There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.D.2.b. Develop self-monitoring strategies for frequently misspelled words
SpellingAre There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.3. Maintain a personal list of words to use in editing original writing

SpellingAre There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.6.0. Listening

6.A.2. Apply comprehension and literary analysis strategies and skills for a variety of listening purposes and settings

6.A.2.c. Determine speaker's attitude through verbal and non-verbal cues such as tone of voice, inflections, body language, facial expressions
Context CluesContext clues are clues found in a text that may help you figure out the definition of a word that you do not know. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
VocabularyYour vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context CluesThe five types of Context Clues are: Example Clues (group of items in a category), Synonym Clues (similar meaning is in the text), Antonym Clues (opposite meaning is in the text), Direct Definition Clues (meaning is stated in the sentence) and Appositive Clues (meaning is set off by commas). Read more...iWorksheets :3
VocabularyWhat is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Vocabulary What Is Vocabulary? Vocabulary refers to a collection of words. Our English vocabulary developed in a variety of ways: Names of people and places provide some English words. Rudolf Diesel invented an engine that is named after him. The first letters of words, called acronyms, provide new words for our language. Shortened words provide some new English words. The word hamburger provides the shortened word burger. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.7.0. Speaking

7.A.1. Demonstrate appropriate organizational strategies and delivery techniques to plan for a variety of oral presentation purposes

7.A.1.a. Identify the purpose, audience, and setting for a presentation
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.A.1.b. Identify the needs and perspectives of the audience
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.A.1.c. Select and plan for appropriate use of visual aids
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.A.1.d. Select the topic of an oral presentation
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.A.1.f. Identify and use a variety of organization structures such as narrative, cause and effect, chronological order, description, main idea and detail, problem/solution, question/answer, comparison and contrast
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

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