Indiana Academic Standards for High School Physics

Forces and Motion
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2
Light
Worksheets: 3
Light and Optics
Worksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 3
Measurements and Calculations
Worksheets: 3
The Science of Physics
Worksheets: 4

IN.B. Biology (B)

B.1. Cellular Structure and Function

B.1.1. Compare and contrast the shape and function of the essential biological macromolecules (i.e. carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids), as well as, how chemical elements (i.e. carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur) can combine to form these biomolecules.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
B.1.2. Analyze how the shape of a molecule determines its role in the many different types of cellular processes (e.g., metabolism, homeostasis, growth and development, and heredity) and understand that the majority of these processes involve proteins that act as enzymes.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
B.1.3. Develop and use models that illustrate how a cell membrane regulates the uptake of materials essential for growth and survival while removing or preventing harmful waste materials from accumulating through the processes of active and passive transport.
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
B.1.4. Develop and use models to illustrate how specialized structures within cells (i.e. nuclei, ribosomes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum) interact to produce, modify, and transport proteins.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
B.1.5. Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems (cell, tissue, organ, organ system) that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

B.2. Matter Cycles and Energy Transfer

B.2.1. Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy.
Photosynthesis and respiration
Photosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
B.2.2. Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
B.2.3. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
B.2.4. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

B.3. Interdependence

B.3.1. Use mathematical and/or computational representation to explain why the carrying capacity ecosystems can support is limited by the available energy, water, oxygen, and minerals and by the ability of ecosystems to recycle the remains of dead organisms.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

B.4. Inheritance and Variation in Traits

B.4.1. Develop and revise a model that clarifies the relationship between DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
B.4.2. Construct an explanation for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
B.4.3. Construct a model to explain that the unique shape and function of each protein is determined by the sequence of its amino acids, and thus is determined by the sequence of the DNA that codes for this protein.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
B.4.4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
B.4.5. Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
B.4.6. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7

B.5. Evolution

B.5.3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support a claim that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
B.5.4. Evaluate evidence to explain the role of natural selection as an evolutionary mechanism that leads to the adaptation of species, and to support claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and/or (3) the extinction of other species.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
B.5.5. Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors: (1) the potential for a species to increase in number, (2) the heritable genetic variation of individuals in a species due to mutation and sexual reproduction, (3) competition for limited resources, and (4) the proliferation of those organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
B.5.6. Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record and molecular data that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

IN.C. Chemistry (C)

C.1. Properties and States of Matter

C.1.1. Differentiate between pure substances and mixtures based on physical and chemical properties.
C.1.2. Use chemical properties, extensive, and intensive physical properties to identify substances.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3
C.1.4. Describe physical and chemical changes at the particle level.
C.1.5. Describe the characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases and changes in state at the macroscopic and microscopic levels.
Matter and Energy
Worksheets :3
C.1.6. Demonstrate an understanding of the law of conservation of mass through the use of particle diagrams and mathematical models.
Chemical Reactions
Worksheets :3

C.2. Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table

C.2.2. Determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in isotopes and calculate the average atomic mass from isotopic abundance data.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3
Nuclear Chemistry
Worksheets :3
Atomic and Nuclear Physics
FreeWorksheets :4
C.2.3. Write the full and noble gas electron configuration of an element, determine its valence electrons, and relate this to its position on the periodic table.
C.2.4. Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the pattern of valence electrons and periodic trends.
C.2.5. Compare and contrast nuclear reactions with chemical reactions.

C.3. Bonding and Molecular Structure

C.3.1. Investigate the observable characteristics of elements, ionic, and covalent compounds.
C.3.2. Compare and contrast how ionic and covalent compounds form.
C.3.4. Write chemical formulas for ionic compounds and covalent compounds given their names and vice versa.
C.3.5. Use laboratory observations and data to compare and contrast ionic, covalent, network, metallic, polar, and non-polar substances with respect to constituent particles, strength of bonds, melting, and boiling points and conductivity; provide examples of each type.

C.4. Reactions and Stoichiometry

C.4.1. Describe, classify, and give examples of various kinds of reactions: synthesis (i.e., combination), decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, acid/base, and combustion.
C.4.2. Predict products of simple reactions as listed in C.4.1.
C.4.3. Balance chemical equations and use the law of conservation of mass to explain why this must be true.
Chemical Equations
Worksheets :3
Chemical Reactions
Worksheets :3
C.4.4. Apply the mole concept to determine the mass, moles, number of particles, or volume of a gas at STP, in any given sample, for an element or compound.
The Mole
Worksheets :3

C.5. Behavior of Gases

C.5.1. Use the kinetic molecular theory with the combined and ideal gas laws to explain changes in volume, pressure, moles, and temperature of a gas.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3

C.6. Thermochemistry

C.6.1. Explain that atoms and molecules are in constant motion and that this motion increases as thermal energy increases.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
C.6.2. Distinguish between the concepts of temperature and heat flow in macroscopic and microscopic terms.
Kinetics and Equilibrium
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
C.6.3. Classify chemical reactions and phase changes as exothermic or endothermic based on enthalpy values. Use a graphical representation to illustrate the energy changes involved.
C.6.4. Perform calculations involving heat flow, temperature changes, and phase changes by using known values of specific heat, phase change constants, or both.
Heat
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4

C.7. Solutions

C.7.1. Describe the composition and properties of solutions.
Solutions
Worksheets :3
C.7.3. Describe the concentration of solutes in a solution in terms of molarity. Perform calculations using molarity, mass, and volume. Prepare a sample of given molarity provided a known solute.
The Mole
Worksheets :3

C.8. Acids and Bases

C.8.1. Classify solutions as acids or bases and describe their characteristic properties.
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1
C.8.2. Compare and contrast the strength of acids and bases in solutions.
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1

IN.ES. Earth and Space Science (ES)

ES.1. The Universe

ES.1.2. Describe the expanding universe theory, also known as the "Big Bang Theory," based on observed astronomical evidence including: The Doppler Effect, red shift, Hubble's Law, and the cosmic microwave background.
ES.1.3. Create a diagram, flowchart, or written explanation that details the cooling of energy into protons and early elements, and early elements into superstars and galaxies. Explain the role of gravitational attraction in the formation of stars and galaxies from clouds of these early elements.
ES.1.4. Differentiate between the life cycles of stars of different masses found on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. Differentiate between low, medium (including our sun), and high mass stars by what elements can be produced, and therefore whether or not they can achieve red giant phase or go supernova.
ES.1.5. Illustrate the hierarchical relationship and scales of stars, planetary systems including multiple-star systems, star clusters, galaxies, and galactic groups in the universe.

ES.2. The Solar System

ES.2.1. Construct a flowchart with diagrams and descriptions outlining the nebular theory of solar system formation. Include the formation of one or more stars, planetesimals, protoplanets, Jovian and terrestrial planets, and other objects including satellites and small bodies.
ES.2.2. Describe the characteristics of the various kinds of objects in the solar system including planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, and protoplanets. Recognize that planets have been identified orbiting stars other than the sun, or exist outside of solar systems orbiting no sun at all. Describe the organization of our solar system including terrestrial and Jovian planets, asteroid belts, and the Oort Cloud.
ES.2.3. Develop a model illustrating the layers and life span of the sun. Explain how nuclear fusion in the core produces elements and energy, which are both retained through convection and released to space, including Earth, through radiation. Additionally, elements heavier than iron cannot form in stars, and form only as a result of supernovae.
ES.2.4. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to demonstrate the motions of the various kinds of objects in our solar system including planets, satellites, comets, and asteroids. Explain that Kepler’s Laws determine the orbits of those objects and know that Kepler’s Laws are a direct consequence of Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation together with his laws of motion.
ES.2.5. Explain how scientific theory changes over time with the introduction of new information and observational data. Use works from ancient Greeks such as Ptolemy, and other astronomers including Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo to demonstrate the effect of observational data and scientific discussion on our understanding of the mechanics and motion of our solar system.

ES.3. Earth Cycles and Systems

ES.3.1. Create flowcharts that show the exchange of carbon and oxygen between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere, including carbon dioxide and methane. Explain how human activities such as farming and industry, temperature change in oceans, and natural processes such as volcanic eruptions can speed or slow the cycling from reservoirs within the solid earth and oceans into the atmosphere.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
ES.3.2. Create diagrams and flowcharts that show the cycling between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere for nitrogen. Complete the same for phosphorus, excluding the atmosphere. Explain how human activities can alter the amounts of both phosphorus and nitrogen between these layers.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
ES.3.3. Analyze and explain how events on one side of the world can alter temperature and precipitation around the globe. Analyze and explain the possible effects of natural and human-driven processes on our atmosphere and climate.
ES.3.4. Evaluate the use of sustainable versus nonrenewable resources. Explain the consequences of overuse and continued increased consumption of limited resources. Analyze and evaluate the benefits of researching, designing, and developing sustainable resources for private use and industry.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

ES.4. The Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

ES.4.1. Create a model that shows the composition, distribution, and circulation of gases in Earth's atmosphere. Show how carbon and oxygen cycles affect the composition through gas exchange with organisms, oceans, the solid earth, and industry.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.2. Create models to demonstrate the circulation, retention, and reflection of heat in regards to the atmosphere, solid land, and bodies of water including lakes and oceans. Demonstrate the effects of cities, various terrain, cloud cover, sea ice, and open water on albedo. Examine local and global heat exchanges, including land & sea breezes, lake effects, urban heat islands, and thermohaline circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.3. Create a presentation that demonstrates the process of the water cycle on both local and global scales. Illustrate the process of water cycling both from the solid earth to the atmosphere and around the solid earth. Examine the interaction of ground water, surface water, and ocean circulation. Illustrate the effects of human activity on water systems.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.4. Create a model to demonstrate how the Coriolis Effect influences the global circulation of the atmosphere. Explain how changes in the circulation of the atmosphere and oceans can create events such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.5. Chart and explain the changes in weather as it relates to humidity, air pressure, and temperature. Explain how these factors result in local wind patterns and cloud cover. Explain the origin, life cycle, and behavior of weather systems, especially severe weather. Create an emergency plan for severe storms, both summer and winter.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.6. Differentiate between weather and climate. Examine long term, natural climate change and periods of glaciation as influenced by Milankovitch Cycles due to the gravity of other solar system bodies (obliquity and precession of axis and eccentricity of orbit). Explain how these are different from any short term (less than thousands of years) changes to climate.

ES.5. The Solid Earth

ES.5.1. Construct a lab to analyze minerals based on their physical and chemical properties. Explain how rocks may contain many minerals, one mineral, or no minerals, and minerals can be made of either single elements (such as gold) or compounds (such as silicates).
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ES.5.2. Create a rock cycle flowchart or diagram that demonstrates the processes involved in the formation, breakdown, and reformation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock. Show how each type can melt and reform igneous rock, undergo the various metamorphic processes, and undergo physical and chemical weathering to form sedimentary rock.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.3. Construct a model that demonstrates the difference between weathering, erosion, transportation of material, deposition, and new soil and sedimentary rock formation. Differentiate between types of physical and chemical weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.4. Differentiate between relative and absolute geological time. Detail how sedimentary rock can be dated based on relative-age dating and positioning, while igneous formations can be radiometrically dated. Differentiate between radiocarbon dating used for organic materials and other types of radiometric dating for inorganic rock formation.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ES.5.6. Create models or diagrams to show how plate movement and sea level changes have changed continental land masses over time. Include the creation and destruction of inland seas, sedimentary rock formations including evaporites and biochemical formations, and the shaping and destruction of surface features.

ES.6. Earth Processes

ES.6.1. Construct a diagram or model that identifies and describes the physical and chemical properties of the crust, mantle, outer core, and inner core of Earth.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.6.2. Explain how Earth's fluid outer core creates the magnetosphere and how this helps protect both humans and technology (such as satellites) from solar winds.
ES.6.3. Construct a diagram and explanation showing the convection of Earth's mantle and its impact on the movements of tectonic plates. Explain how the decay of radioactive isotopes and residual energy from Earth's original formation provide the heat to fuel this convective process, which, along with ridge push and slab pull, drive the movements of tectonic plates.
E.S.6.4. Create a timeline to show the development of modern tectonic plate theory. Identify and explain how the evidence from the theory of continental drift, seafloor spreading, and paleomagnetism built upon each other to support tectonic plate theory.
E.S.6.5. Create models that demonstrate different types of orogeny resulting from plate tectonics. Show how the interactions between oceanic and continental plates create different geological features (such as volcanic island arcs or high altitude plateaus) depending on what types of plates are involved in the motions along different plate boundaries.
E.S.6.6. Create models and differentiate between shield, composite, and cinder cone volcanoes. Explain how volcanoes form, how the chemical composition of lava affects the type of volcanoes formed, and how the location (such as hot spots or along continental or oceanic margins) can affect the types of magma present.
E.S.6.7. Use models, diagrams, and captions to explain how tectonic motion creates earthquakes and tsunamis. Using resources such as indianamap.org, analyze how close the school is to known faults and liquefaction potential. Differentiate between intraplate fault zones such as the Wabash Valley Fault System and the more commonly discussed faults along tectonic margins.
E.S.6.8. Create an action plan detailing what to do in an emergency if an earthquake occurred near the school or home. Detail what should be kept in an earthquake preparation kit, how to prepare homes for earthquake safety, and what actions should be taken during and after an earthquake to ensure personal safety.

IN.ENV. Environmental Science (ENV)

Env.1. Environmental Systems

Env.1.4. Diagram the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water and describe the human impacts on each.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.1.6. Describe the difference between weather and climate. Locate, identify, and describe the major Earth biomes. Explain how biomes are determined by climate (temperature and precipitation patterns) that support specific kinds of plants.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.1.9. Describe how weather can be influenced by global climatic patterns, such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.2. Flow of Matter and Energy

Env.2.1. Describe how matter cycles through sources and sinks and how energy is transferred. Explain how matter and energy move between and within components of an environmental system.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.2.11. Recognize and describe the role of natural resources in providing the raw materials for an industrial society.
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2

Env.3. Natural Disasters

Env.3.1. Identify and describe geomorphic processes controlled by tectonics (i.e. volcanic activity, uplift, and shaping of landforms).
Env.3.2. Identify and describe tornado formation with the use of a weather map.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.3. Read and describe a weather map in terms of pressure systems, fronts, and changing weather patterns.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.4. Identify natural Earth hazards, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and identify the regions in which they occur as well as the short-term and long-term effects on the environment and on people.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.5. Biodiversity

Env.5.1. Explain how variation within a species increases the chances of survival of the species under changing environmental conditions.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Env.5.2. Explain how the great diversity of species increases the chance that at least some living organisms will survive in the event of major global changes.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.5.5. Identify the indirect and direct threats to biodiversity (e.g. habitat loss and destruction, invasion by exotic species, commercial over fishing and hunting, pollution, climate change, and bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxins).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.5.6. Identify and explain the three levels of biodiversity: genetic, species, and ecosystem.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.7. Pollution

Env.7.2. Differentiate between natural pollution and pollution caused by humans.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.7.5. Identify and describe the major air pollutants and their sources and impacts on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.8. Natural and Anthropogenic Resource Cycles

Env.8.5. Describe and examine how water is controlled in developed and undeveloped nations.

IN.ICP. Integrated Chemistry and Physics (ICP)

ICP.1. Constant Velocity

ICP.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a constant velocity and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
ICP.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object moving in one dimension.
ICP.1.3. Distinguish between the terms “distance” and “displacement,” and determine the value of either given a graphical or mathematical representation of position vs. clock reading (time).
ICP.1.4. Distinguish between the terms “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and determine the value of any of these measurements given either a graphical or mathematical representation.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3

ICP.2. Uniform Acceleration

ICP.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a constant acceleration and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object in terms of its change in position or velocity.
ICP.2.2. Describe the differences between average velocity and instantaneous velocity and be able to determine either quantity given a graph of position vs clock reading (time).

ICP.3. Newton’s Laws of Motion (One Dimension)

ICP.3.1. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a single external applied force changes the velocity of an object, and that when no force acts, the velocity of an object remains constant.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
ICP.3.3. Distinguish between forces acting on a body and forces exerted by the body. Categorize forces as contact forces, friction, or action at a distance (field) forces.
ICP.3.4. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a non-zero net force on an object results in an acceleration of the object and that the acceleration of an object of constant mass is proportional to the total force acting on it, and inversely proportional to its mass for a constant applied total force.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3

ICP.4. Energy

ICP.4.1. Define energy as a quantity that can be represented as being within a system that is distinct from the remainder of the universe and is measured in Joules.
ICP.4.2. Identify forms of energy present in a system (kinetic, gravitational, elastic, etc.), and pictorially represent the distribution of energies, such as using pie or bar charts.

ICP.5. Particle Theory of Matter

ICP.5.1. Develop pictorial representations which show that matter is made of particles.
ICP.5.2. Describe the assumptions used to develop the kinetic theory of gasses.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
ICP.5.3. At the particle level, describe the relationship between temperature and the average kinetic energy of particles in the system and describe how a thermometer measures the temperature of a system.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Gases
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
Heat
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
ICP.5.4. Distinguish “temperature” from “thermal energy,” compare and contrast the Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin temperature scales, and convert temperatures between them.
Gases
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
Heat
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
ICP.5.5. Evaluate graphical or pictorial representations that describe the relationship among the volume, temperature, and number of molecules and the pressure exerted by the system to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing any of those variables affects the others.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
ICP.5.6. Describe and demonstrate how the kinetic theory can be extended to describe the properties of liquids and solids by introducing attractive forces between the particles.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
ICP.5.8. Collect and use experimental data to determine the number of items in a sample without actually counting them and qualitatively relate this to Avogadro's hypothesis.
The Mole
Worksheets :3

ICP.6. Describing Substances

ICP.6.1. Distinguish between elements, mixtures, and compounds based on their composition and bonds and be able to construct or sketch particle models to represent them.
ICP.6.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations to show that mixtures can be made in any proportion and separated based on the properties of the components of the mixture and apply those representations to quantitatively determine the ratio of components.
ICP.6.3. Cite the evidence that supports the idea that some pure substances are combined of elements in a definite ratio, as for example seen in electrolysis of water.
ICP.6.4. Given the periodic table, determine the atomic mass, atomic number, and charges for any element.
ICP.6.5. Given a periodic table, understand and describe the significance of column location for the elements by calculation of molar ratios of known compounds.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3

ICP.7. Representing Chemical Change

ICP.7.1. Pictorially or mathematically represent chemical changes using particle diagrams and chemical equations.
Chemical Equations
Worksheets :3
Chemical Reactions
Worksheets :3
ICP.7.2. Demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter in terms of atoms and mass of substances by balancing equations.
Chemical Equations
Worksheets :3
ICP.7.3. Differentiate the basic types of reactions, for example: synthesis, decomposition, combustion, single replacement, and double replacement.
Chemical Reactions
Worksheets :3
ICP.7.4. Using balanced equations and stoichiometric calculations, demonstrate the principle of Conservation of Matter in terms of atoms and mass.
Chemical Equations
Worksheets :3

ICP.8. Electricity and Magnetism

ICP.8.1. Describe electrical current in terms of the motion of electrons within a device and relate the rate of motion of the electrons to the amount of current measured.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
ICP.8.2. Describe the relationship among voltage, current, and resistance for an electrical system consisting of a single voltage source and a single device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
ICP.8.3. Describe on a macroscopic scale how any distribution of magnetic materials (e.g. iron filings, ferrofluid, etc.) aligns with the magnetic field created by a simple magnet.
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3

ICP.9. Waves

ICP.9.1. Develop qualitative particle models of mechanical waves and explain the relationship of the particles and their interactions in transverse and longitudinal waves, as well as, how waves appear in nature as in water waves and tsunamis, ground waves in earth quakes, and sound waves.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ICP.9.3. Qualitatively describe the reflection and transmission of a mechanical wave at either a fixed or free boundary or interface.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
ICP.9.4. Describe how interacting waves produce different phenomena than singular waves in a medium (e.g. periodic changes in volume of sound or resonance).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

ICP.10. Nuclear Energy

ICP.10.2. Describe the model of the atomic nucleus and explain how the nucleus stays together in spite of the repulsion between protons.

IN.PI. Physics I (PI)

PI.1. Constant Velocity

PI.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a uniform rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PI.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object.
PI.1.3. Rank the velocities of objects in a system based on the slope of a position vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative velocity can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive velocity.
PI.1.4. Describe the differences between the terms “distance,” “displacement,” “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and be able to calculate any of those values given an object moving at a single constant velocity or with different constant velocities over a given time interval.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3

PI.2. Constant Acceleration

PI.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a uniformly changing rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PI.2.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of velocity vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the acceleration of the object.
PI.2.3. Rank the accelerations of objects in a system based on the slope of a velocity vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative acceleration can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PI.2.4. Given a graphical representation of the position, velocity, or acceleration vs. clock reading (time), be able to identify or sketch the shape of the other two graphs.
PI.2.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the models of constant velocity and constant acceleration to determine the position or velocity of an object moving in free fall near the surface of the Earth.

PI.3. Forces

PI.3.1. Understand Newton’s first law of motion and describe the motion of an object in the absence of a net external force according to Newton’s first law.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Momentum and Collisions
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
PI.3.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the inertial mass of an object, the total force applied, and the acceleration of an object in one dimension where one or more forces is applied to the object and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how a net external force changes the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3

PI.4. Energy

PI.4.1. Evaluate the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in simple situations using the mathematical definitions of these quantities and mathematically relate the initial and final values of the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in the absence of a net external force.
PI.4.2. Identify the forms of energy present in a scenario and recognize that the potential energy associated with a system of objects and is not stored in the object itself.
PI.4.3. Conceptually define “work” as the process of transferring of energy into or out of a system when an object is moved under the application of an external force and operationally define “work” as the area under a force vs. change in position curve.
Work and Energy
Worksheets :4
PI.4.4. For a force exerted in one or two dimensions, mathematically determine the amount of work done on a system by an unbalanced force over a change in position in one dimension.
Work and Energy
Worksheets :4
PI.4.6. Develop and apply pictorial, mathematical or graphical representations to qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in the mechanical energy (e.g. translational kinetic, gravitational, or elastic potential) of a system due to changes in position or speed of objects or non-conservative interactions within the system.

PI.5. Linear Momentum In One Dimension

PI.5.1. For an object moving at constant rate, define linear momentum as the product of an object’s mass and its velocity and be able to quantitatively determine the linear momentum of a single object.
PI.5.2. Operationally define “impulse” as the area under a force vs. change in clock reading (time) curve and be able to determine the change in linear momentum of a system acted on by an external force. Predict the change in linear momentum of an object from the average force exerted on the object and time interval during which the force is exerted.
PI.5.3. Demonstrate that when two objects interact through a collision or separation that both the force experienced by each object and change in linear momentum of each object are equal and opposite, and as the mass of an object increases, the change in velocity of that object decreases.
PI.5.4. Determine the individual and total linear momentum for a two-body system before and after an interaction (e.g. collision or separation) between the two objects and show that the total linear momentum of the system remains constant when no external force is applied consistent with Newton’s third law.
PI.5.5. Classify an interaction (e.g. collision or separation) between two objects as elastic or inelastic based on the change in linear kinetic energy of the system.

PI.6. Simple Harmonic Oscillating Systems

PI.6.1. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of stretch of a spring and the restoring force and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the stretch or compression will affect the restoring force and vice versa, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
PI.6.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of restoring force vs. change in length of an elastic material in terms of the elastic constant of the material, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
PI.6.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the mass, elastic constant, and period of a simple horizontal mass-spring system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the mass or elastic constant will affect the period of the system for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3

PI.7. Mechanical Waves and Sound

PI.7.1. Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal modes of oscillation for a mechanical wave traveling in one dimension.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PI.7.5. Apply the mechanical wave model to sound waves and qualitatively and quantitatively determine how the relative motion of a source and observer affects the frequency of a wave as described by the Doppler Effect.
Sound
Worksheets :3
PI.7.6. Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the principle of superposition to describe the interaction of two mechanical waves or pulses.
Sound
Worksheets :3
PI.7.7. Qualitatively describe the phenomena of both resonance frequencies and beat frequencies that arise from the interference of sound waves of slightly different frequency and define the beat frequency as the difference between the frequencies of two individual sound wave sources.
Sound
Worksheets :3

PI.8. Simple Circuit Analysis

PI.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations that describe the relationship between length, cross-sectional area, and resistivity of an ohmic device and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the composition, size, or shape of the device affect the resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of resistance vs. the ratio of length to cross-sectional area in terms of the resistivity of the material.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.4. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple series (i.e. loop) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.6. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple parallel (i.e. ladder) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.9. Use a description or schematic diagram of an electrical circuit to calculate unknown values of current, voltage, or resistance in various components or branches of the circuit according to Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s junction rule, and Kirchhoff’s loop rule.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

IN.PII. Physics II (PII)

PII.1. Energy and Momentum in Two Dimensions

PII.1.1. For a system consisting of a single object with a net external force applied, qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in its linear momentum using the impulse-momentum theorem and in its translational kinetic energy using the work-energy theorem.
PII.1.2. For a system consisting of a two objects with no net external forces applied, qualitatively and quantitatively analyze a two dimensional interaction (i.e. collision or separation) to show that the total linear momentum of the system remains constant.
PII.1.4. Classify interactions between two objects moving in two dimensions as elastic, inelastic, and completely inelastic.

PII.2. Temperature and Thermal Energy Transfer

PII.2.1. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the temperature, thermal energy, and thermal energy transfer (i.e. heat) in the kinetic molecular theory and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the temperature of a substance affects the motion of the molecules.
Heat
Worksheets :3
PII.2.2. Describe the process of the transfer of thermal energy (i.e. heat) that occurs during the heating cycle of a substance from solid to gas and relate the changes in molecular motion to temperature changes that are observed.
Matter and Energy
Worksheets :3
PII.2.4. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the volume, temperature, and number of molecules of an ideal gas in a closed system and the pressure exerted by the system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing any of those variables affects the others.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
PII.2.5. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of pressure vs. the product of: the number of particles, temperature of the gas, and inverse of the volume of the gas in terms of the ideal gas constant.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
PII.2.6. Using PV graphs, qualitatively and quantitatively determine how changes in the pressure, volume, or temperature of an ideal gas allow the gas to do work and classify the work as either done on or done by the gas.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3

PII.3. Fluids

PII.3.1. For a static, incompressible fluid, develop and apply graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the density and the pressure exerted at various positions in the fluid, and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the depth or density affects the pressure.
Matter and Energy
Worksheets :3
Gases
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4

PII.5. Simple and Complex Circuits

PII.5.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law. Apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa for an ohmic device of known resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.3. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PII.5.4. Define and describe a device as ohmic or non-ohmic based on the relationship between the current passing through the device and the voltage across the device based on the shape of the curve of a current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current graphical representation.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.5. Explain and analyze simple arrangements of electrical components in series and parallel DC circuits in terms of current, resistance, voltage and power. Use Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws to analyze DC circuits.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.6. Magnetism

PII.6.1. Describe the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and diamagnetic materials on a macroscopic scale and atomic scale.
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
PII.6.3. Describe the motion of a charged or uncharged particle through a uniform magnetic field.
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PII.6.4. Determine the magnitude of the magnetic force acting on a charged particle moving through a uniform magnetic field and apply the right hand rule to determine the direction of either the magnetic force or the magnetic field.
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PII.6.5. Describe the practical uses of magnetism in motors, electronic devices, mass spectroscopy, MRIs, and other applications.
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3

PII.7. Electromagnetic Induction

PII.7.3. Apply Ohm’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and Lenz’s Law to determine the amount and direction of current induced by a changing magnetic flux in a loop of wire or simple loop circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.8. Geometric Optics

PII.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance and the object distance for planar, converging, and diverging mirrors and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.2. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationship between the angles of incidence and refraction of monochromatic light passed between two different media and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle of incidence affects the angle of refraction.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.3. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance, and the object distance for both converging and diverging lenses and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3

PII.9. Particle and Wave Nature of Light

PII.9.1. Develop the relationship among frequency, wavelength, and energy for electromagnetic waves across the entire spectrum.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PII.9.2. Explain how electromagnetic waves interact with matter both as particles (i.e. photons) and as waves and be able to apply the most appropriate model to any particular scenario.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Magnetism
Worksheets :3

IN.AP. Anatomy & Physiology (AP)

AP.1. Levels of Organization in the Human Body: Cellular

AP.1.1. Investigate the forms of cellular transport within and across cell membranes. Explain how passive and active transport move materials through the body and into/out of cells. Describe the how simple diffusion differs from facilitated diffusion. Describe how vesicular transport moves materials within a cell.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.1.2. Develop a model which describes the stages of somatic cell division (mitosis), how it contributes to maintaining homeostasis, and why cellular differentiation is vital to development.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
AP.1.3. Explore the homeostatic range to sustaining human life, the principal mechanism involved, and predict the consequences of what happens when homeostasis is not maintained.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.1.4. Introduce the basic step and control mechanisms of protein synthesis.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

AP.2. Levels of Organization in the Human Body: Tissue and Organs

AP.2.1. Analyze how each hierarchical level of life contributes to complexity of anatomy and physiological functions (e.g. cells, tissues, etc.). Investigate the relationships among various tissue types as well as the molecular and cellular composition of these tissues.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.2.2. Investigate and be able to describe the histological structural and functional characteristics of the four basic tissue types.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.2.3. Identify the body cavities, their membranes, and the organs within each cavity. Investigate the major organ systems and describe their basic functional importance.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.5. Movement and Support in the Human Body: The Muscular System

AP.5.1. Compare and contrast the structural and functional similarities and differences between skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.5.5. Identify the major muscles on a diagram, model, or through dissection.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.6. Integration and Coordination in the Human Body: The Nervous System

AP.6.1. Develop a model that illustrates the structural components and functional subdivisions of the nervous system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.8. Integration and Coordination in the Human Body: The Endocrine System

AP.8.1. Investigate the structure and function of the endocrine system and develop models showing how changes in prominent hormone levels impact homeostasis throughout the body systems.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.8.2. Discuss the structural and functional differences between an endocrine gland and an exocrine gland.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.8.4. Investigate the hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary complex, the function of these hormones in controlling the thyroid, gonads, and adrenal cortex; and the feedback signals that control them. Evaluate how the HP complex, the sympathetic nervous system, and the adrenal medulla are influenced by stress.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.10. Transport in the Human Body: The Cardiovascular System

AP.10.1. Investigate the primary structures of the cardiovascular system and explore their functional importance to maintaining homeostasis.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.10.2. Investigate the stages, control, and regulation of the cardiac cycle.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.10.6. Investigate how the cardiovascular system and other body systems respond to changes in blood volume as well as changes in physical activity which allow the body to maintain homeostasis.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.11. Transport in the Human Body: The Lymphatic System and Immune Mechanisms

AP.11.2. Investigate the difference between innate and acquired immunity. Examine how cellular and non-cellular components work collectively to defend the body against foreign pathogens and how they contribute to maintaining homeostasis.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.12. Absorption and Excretion in the Human Body: The Digestive System

AP.12.1. Identify and locate major and accessory organs of the digestive system and investigate their physiological functions.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.12.2. Investigate the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs in relation to the processing, digesting, and absorbing of the three major biomolecules.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.13. Absorption and Excretion in the Human Body: The Respiratory System

AP.13.1. Identify and locate major organs of the respiratory system and discuss their functions.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.13.2. Investigate the anatomical structures and physiological processes involved in inspiration & expiration.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.13.4. Describe how the body monitors changes in blood pH and carbon dioxide using specialized receptors and how the respiratory system adjusts in order to maintain homeostasis.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

AP.15. Life Cycle in the Human Body: The Reproductive System

AP.15.1. Identify and locate major and accessory organs of the female and male reproductive systems and discuss their functions.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
AP.15.2. Discuss the role of hormones in the reproductive system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

IN.B. Biology (B)

B.5. Evolution

B.5.6. Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record and molecular data that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

IN.C. Chemistry (C)

C.3. Bonding and Molecular Structure

C.3.4. Write chemical formulas for ionic compounds and covalent compounds given their names and vice versa.

IN.ES. Earth and Space Science (ES)

ES.1. The Universe

ES.1.2. Describe the expanding universe theory, also known as the "Big Bang Theory," based on observed astronomical evidence including: The Doppler Effect, red shift, Hubble's Law, and the cosmic microwave background.
ES.1.3. Create a diagram, flowchart, or written explanation that details the cooling of energy into protons and early elements, and early elements into superstars and galaxies. Explain the role of gravitational attraction in the formation of stars and galaxies from clouds of these early elements.
ES.1.4. Differentiate between the life cycles of stars of different masses found on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. Differentiate between low, medium (including our sun), and high mass stars by what elements can be produced, and therefore whether or not they can achieve red giant phase or go supernova.
ES.1.5. Illustrate the hierarchical relationship and scales of stars, planetary systems including multiple-star systems, star clusters, galaxies, and galactic groups in the universe.

ES.2. The Solar System

ES.2.1. Construct a flowchart with diagrams and descriptions outlining the nebular theory of solar system formation. Include the formation of one or more stars, planetesimals, protoplanets, Jovian and terrestrial planets, and other objects including satellites and small bodies.
ES.2.2. Describe the characteristics of the various kinds of objects in the solar system including planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, and protoplanets. Recognize that planets have been identified orbiting stars other than the sun, or exist outside of solar systems orbiting no sun at all. Describe the organization of our solar system including terrestrial and Jovian planets, asteroid belts, and the Oort Cloud.
ES.2.3. Develop a model illustrating the layers and life span of the sun. Explain how nuclear fusion in the core produces elements and energy, which are both retained through convection and released to space, including Earth, through radiation. Additionally, elements heavier than iron cannot form in stars, and form only as a result of supernovae.
ES.2.4. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to demonstrate the motions of the various kinds of objects in our solar system including planets, satellites, comets, and asteroids. Explain that Kepler’s Laws determine the orbits of those objects and know that Kepler’s Laws are a direct consequence of Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation together with his laws of motion.
ES.2.5. Explain how scientific theory changes over time with the introduction of new information and observational data. Use works from ancient Greeks such as Ptolemy, and other astronomers including Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo to demonstrate the effect of observational data and scientific discussion on our understanding of the mechanics and motion of our solar system.

ES.3. Earth Cycles and Systems

ES.3.1. Create flowcharts that show the exchange of carbon and oxygen between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere, including carbon dioxide and methane. Explain how human activities such as farming and industry, temperature change in oceans, and natural processes such as volcanic eruptions can speed or slow the cycling from reservoirs within the solid earth and oceans into the atmosphere.
ES.3.3. Analyze and explain how events on one side of the world can alter temperature and precipitation around the globe. Analyze and explain the possible effects of natural and human-driven processes on our atmosphere and climate.
ES.3.4. Evaluate the use of sustainable versus nonrenewable resources. Explain the consequences of overuse and continued increased consumption of limited resources. Analyze and evaluate the benefits of researching, designing, and developing sustainable resources for private use and industry.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

ES.4. The Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

ES.4.1. Create a model that shows the composition, distribution, and circulation of gases in Earth's atmosphere. Show how carbon and oxygen cycles affect the composition through gas exchange with organisms, oceans, the solid earth, and industry.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.2. Create models to demonstrate the circulation, retention, and reflection of heat in regards to the atmosphere, solid land, and bodies of water including lakes and oceans. Demonstrate the effects of cities, various terrain, cloud cover, sea ice, and open water on albedo. Examine local and global heat exchanges, including land & sea breezes, lake effects, urban heat islands, and thermohaline circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.3. Create a presentation that demonstrates the process of the water cycle on both local and global scales. Illustrate the process of water cycling both from the solid earth to the atmosphere and around the solid earth. Examine the interaction of ground water, surface water, and ocean circulation. Illustrate the effects of human activity on water systems.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.4. Create a model to demonstrate how the Coriolis Effect influences the global circulation of the atmosphere. Explain how changes in the circulation of the atmosphere and oceans can create events such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.5. Chart and explain the changes in weather as it relates to humidity, air pressure, and temperature. Explain how these factors result in local wind patterns and cloud cover. Explain the origin, life cycle, and behavior of weather systems, especially severe weather. Create an emergency plan for severe storms, both summer and winter.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.6. Differentiate between weather and climate. Examine long term, natural climate change and periods of glaciation as influenced by Milankovitch Cycles due to the gravity of other solar system bodies (obliquity and precession of axis and eccentricity of orbit). Explain how these are different from any short term (less than thousands of years) changes to climate.

ES.5. The Solid Earth

ES.5.1. Construct a lab to analyze minerals based on their physical and chemical properties. Explain how rocks may contain many minerals, one mineral, or no minerals, and minerals can be made of either single elements (such as gold) or compounds (such as silicates).
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ES.5.2. Create a rock cycle flowchart or diagram that demonstrates the processes involved in the formation, breakdown, and reformation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock. Show how each type can melt and reform igneous rock, undergo the various metamorphic processes, and undergo physical and chemical weathering to form sedimentary rock.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.3. Construct a model that demonstrates the difference between weathering, erosion, transportation of material, deposition, and new soil and sedimentary rock formation. Differentiate between types of physical and chemical weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.4. Differentiate between relative and absolute geological time. Detail how sedimentary rock can be dated based on relative-age dating and positioning, while igneous formations can be radiometrically dated. Differentiate between radiocarbon dating used for organic materials and other types of radiometric dating for inorganic rock formation.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ES.5.6. Create models or diagrams to show how plate movement and sea level changes have changed continental land masses over time. Include the creation and destruction of inland seas, sedimentary rock formations including evaporites and biochemical formations, and the shaping and destruction of surface features.

ES.6. Earth Processes

ES.6.1. Construct a diagram or model that identifies and describes the physical and chemical properties of the crust, mantle, outer core, and inner core of Earth.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.6.2. Explain how Earth's fluid outer core creates the magnetosphere and how this helps protect both humans and technology (such as satellites) from solar winds.
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
ES.6.3. Construct a diagram and explanation showing the convection of Earth's mantle and its impact on the movements of tectonic plates. Explain how the decay of radioactive isotopes and residual energy from Earth's original formation provide the heat to fuel this convective process, which, along with ridge push and slab pull, drive the movements of tectonic plates.
E.S.6.4. Create a timeline to show the development of modern tectonic plate theory. Identify and explain how the evidence from the theory of continental drift, seafloor spreading, and paleomagnetism built upon each other to support tectonic plate theory.
E.S.6.5. Create models that demonstrate different types of orogeny resulting from plate tectonics. Show how the interactions between oceanic and continental plates create different geological features (such as volcanic island arcs or high altitude plateaus) depending on what types of plates are involved in the motions along different plate boundaries.
E.S.6.6. Create models and differentiate between shield, composite, and cinder cone volcanoes. Explain how volcanoes form, how the chemical composition of lava affects the type of volcanoes formed, and how the location (such as hot spots or along continental or oceanic margins) can affect the types of magma present.
E.S.6.7. Use models, diagrams, and captions to explain how tectonic motion creates earthquakes and tsunamis. Using resources such as indianamap.org, analyze how close the school is to known faults and liquefaction potential. Differentiate between intraplate fault zones such as the Wabash Valley Fault System and the more commonly discussed faults along tectonic margins.
E.S.6.8. Create an action plan detailing what to do in an emergency if an earthquake occurred near the school or home. Detail what should be kept in an earthquake preparation kit, how to prepare homes for earthquake safety, and what actions should be taken during and after an earthquake to ensure personal safety.

IN.ENV. Environmental Science (ENV)

Env.1. Environmental Systems

Env.1.4. Diagram the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water and describe the human impacts on each.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.1.6. Describe the difference between weather and climate. Locate, identify, and describe the major Earth biomes. Explain how biomes are determined by climate (temperature and precipitation patterns) that support specific kinds of plants.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.1.9. Describe how weather can be influenced by global climatic patterns, such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.2. Flow of Matter and Energy

Env.2.1. Describe how matter cycles through sources and sinks and how energy is transferred. Explain how matter and energy move between and within components of an environmental system.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.2.11. Recognize and describe the role of natural resources in providing the raw materials for an industrial society.
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2

Env.3. Natural Disasters

Env.3.1. Identify and describe geomorphic processes controlled by tectonics (i.e. volcanic activity, uplift, and shaping of landforms).
Env.3.2. Identify and describe tornado formation with the use of a weather map.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.3. Read and describe a weather map in terms of pressure systems, fronts, and changing weather patterns.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.4. Identify natural Earth hazards, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and identify the regions in which they occur as well as the short-term and long-term effects on the environment and on people.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.5. Biodiversity

Env.5.5. Identify the indirect and direct threats to biodiversity (e.g. habitat loss and destruction, invasion by exotic species, commercial over fishing and hunting, pollution, climate change, and bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxins).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.7. Pollution

Env.7.2. Differentiate between natural pollution and pollution caused by humans.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.7.5. Identify and describe the major air pollutants and their sources and impacts on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.8. Natural and Anthropogenic Resource Cycles

Env.8.5. Describe and examine how water is controlled in developed and undeveloped nations.

IN.ICP. Integrated Chemistry and Physics (ICP)

ICP.1. Constant Velocity

ICP.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a constant velocity and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
ICP.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object moving in one dimension.
ICP.1.3. Distinguish between the terms “distance” and “displacement,” and determine the value of either given a graphical or mathematical representation of position vs. clock reading (time).
ICP.1.4. Distinguish between the terms “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and determine the value of any of these measurements given either a graphical or mathematical representation.

ICP.2. Uniform Acceleration

ICP.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a constant acceleration and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object in terms of its change in position or velocity.
ICP.2.2. Describe the differences between average velocity and instantaneous velocity and be able to determine either quantity given a graph of position vs clock reading (time).

ICP.3. Newton’s Laws of Motion (One Dimension)

ICP.3.1. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a single external applied force changes the velocity of an object, and that when no force acts, the velocity of an object remains constant.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
ICP.3.3. Distinguish between forces acting on a body and forces exerted by the body. Categorize forces as contact forces, friction, or action at a distance (field) forces.
ICP.3.4. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a non-zero net force on an object results in an acceleration of the object and that the acceleration of an object of constant mass is proportional to the total force acting on it, and inversely proportional to its mass for a constant applied total force.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

ICP.4. Energy

ICP.4.2. Identify forms of energy present in a system (kinetic, gravitational, elastic, etc.), and pictorially represent the distribution of energies, such as using pie or bar charts.

ICP.8. Electricity and Magnetism

ICP.8.1. Describe electrical current in terms of the motion of electrons within a device and relate the rate of motion of the electrons to the amount of current measured.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
ICP.8.2. Describe the relationship among voltage, current, and resistance for an electrical system consisting of a single voltage source and a single device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

ICP.9. Waves

ICP.9.1. Develop qualitative particle models of mechanical waves and explain the relationship of the particles and their interactions in transverse and longitudinal waves, as well as, how waves appear in nature as in water waves and tsunamis, ground waves in earth quakes, and sound waves.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ICP.9.3. Qualitatively describe the reflection and transmission of a mechanical wave at either a fixed or free boundary or interface.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
ICP.9.4. Describe how interacting waves produce different phenomena than singular waves in a medium (e.g. periodic changes in volume of sound or resonance).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

IN.PI. Physics I (PI)

PI.1. Constant Velocity

PI.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a uniform rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object.
PI.1.3. Rank the velocities of objects in a system based on the slope of a position vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative velocity can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive velocity.
PI.1.4. Describe the differences between the terms “distance,” “displacement,” “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and be able to calculate any of those values given an object moving at a single constant velocity or with different constant velocities over a given time interval.

PI.2. Constant Acceleration

PI.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a uniformly changing rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.2.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of velocity vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the acceleration of the object.
PI.2.3. Rank the accelerations of objects in a system based on the slope of a velocity vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative acceleration can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.2.4. Given a graphical representation of the position, velocity, or acceleration vs. clock reading (time), be able to identify or sketch the shape of the other two graphs.
PI.2.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the models of constant velocity and constant acceleration to determine the position or velocity of an object moving in free fall near the surface of the Earth.

PI.3. Forces

PI.3.1. Understand Newton’s first law of motion and describe the motion of an object in the absence of a net external force according to Newton’s first law.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.3.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the inertial mass of an object, the total force applied, and the acceleration of an object in one dimension where one or more forces is applied to the object and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how a net external force changes the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.4. Energy

PI.4.1. Evaluate the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in simple situations using the mathematical definitions of these quantities and mathematically relate the initial and final values of the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in the absence of a net external force.
PI.4.2. Identify the forms of energy present in a scenario and recognize that the potential energy associated with a system of objects and is not stored in the object itself.
PI.4.6. Develop and apply pictorial, mathematical or graphical representations to qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in the mechanical energy (e.g. translational kinetic, gravitational, or elastic potential) of a system due to changes in position or speed of objects or non-conservative interactions within the system.

PI.6. Simple Harmonic Oscillating Systems

PI.6.1. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of stretch of a spring and the restoring force and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the stretch or compression will affect the restoring force and vice versa, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of restoring force vs. change in length of an elastic material in terms of the elastic constant of the material, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the mass, elastic constant, and period of a simple horizontal mass-spring system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the mass or elastic constant will affect the period of the system for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.7. Mechanical Waves and Sound

PI.7.1. Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal modes of oscillation for a mechanical wave traveling in one dimension.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

PI.8. Simple Circuit Analysis

PI.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations that describe the relationship between length, cross-sectional area, and resistivity of an ohmic device and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the composition, size, or shape of the device affect the resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of resistance vs. the ratio of length to cross-sectional area in terms of the resistivity of the material.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.4. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple series (i.e. loop) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.6. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple parallel (i.e. ladder) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.9. Use a description or schematic diagram of an electrical circuit to calculate unknown values of current, voltage, or resistance in various components or branches of the circuit according to Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s junction rule, and Kirchhoff’s loop rule.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

IN.PII. Physics II (PII)

PII.5. Simple and Complex Circuits

PII.5.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law. Apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa for an ohmic device of known resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.3. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PII.5.4. Define and describe a device as ohmic or non-ohmic based on the relationship between the current passing through the device and the voltage across the device based on the shape of the curve of a current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current graphical representation.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.5. Explain and analyze simple arrangements of electrical components in series and parallel DC circuits in terms of current, resistance, voltage and power. Use Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws to analyze DC circuits.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.7. Electromagnetic Induction

PII.7.3. Apply Ohm’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and Lenz’s Law to determine the amount and direction of current induced by a changing magnetic flux in a loop of wire or simple loop circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.8. Geometric Optics

PII.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance and the object distance for planar, converging, and diverging mirrors and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.2. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationship between the angles of incidence and refraction of monochromatic light passed between two different media and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle of incidence affects the angle of refraction.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.3. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance, and the object distance for both converging and diverging lenses and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3

PII.9. Particle and Wave Nature of Light

PII.9.1. Develop the relationship among frequency, wavelength, and energy for electromagnetic waves across the entire spectrum.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PII.9.2. Explain how electromagnetic waves interact with matter both as particles (i.e. photons) and as waves and be able to apply the most appropriate model to any particular scenario.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

IN.B. Biology (B)

B.5. Evolution

B.5.6. Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record and molecular data that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

IN.ES. Earth and Space Science (ES)

ES.1. The Universe

ES.1.2. Describe the expanding universe theory, also known as the "Big Bang Theory," based on observed astronomical evidence including: The Doppler Effect, red shift, Hubble's Law, and the cosmic microwave background.
ES.1.3. Create a diagram, flowchart, or written explanation that details the cooling of energy into protons and early elements, and early elements into superstars and galaxies. Explain the role of gravitational attraction in the formation of stars and galaxies from clouds of these early elements.
ES.1.4. Differentiate between the life cycles of stars of different masses found on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. Differentiate between low, medium (including our sun), and high mass stars by what elements can be produced, and therefore whether or not they can achieve red giant phase or go supernova.
ES.1.5. Illustrate the hierarchical relationship and scales of stars, planetary systems including multiple-star systems, star clusters, galaxies, and galactic groups in the universe.

ES.2. The Solar System

ES.2.1. Construct a flowchart with diagrams and descriptions outlining the nebular theory of solar system formation. Include the formation of one or more stars, planetesimals, protoplanets, Jovian and terrestrial planets, and other objects including satellites and small bodies.
ES.2.2. Describe the characteristics of the various kinds of objects in the solar system including planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, and protoplanets. Recognize that planets have been identified orbiting stars other than the sun, or exist outside of solar systems orbiting no sun at all. Describe the organization of our solar system including terrestrial and Jovian planets, asteroid belts, and the Oort Cloud.
ES.2.3. Develop a model illustrating the layers and life span of the sun. Explain how nuclear fusion in the core produces elements and energy, which are both retained through convection and released to space, including Earth, through radiation. Additionally, elements heavier than iron cannot form in stars, and form only as a result of supernovae.
ES.2.4. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to demonstrate the motions of the various kinds of objects in our solar system including planets, satellites, comets, and asteroids. Explain that Kepler’s Laws determine the orbits of those objects and know that Kepler’s Laws are a direct consequence of Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation together with his laws of motion.
ES.2.5. Explain how scientific theory changes over time with the introduction of new information and observational data. Use works from ancient Greeks such as Ptolemy, and other astronomers including Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo to demonstrate the effect of observational data and scientific discussion on our understanding of the mechanics and motion of our solar system.

ES.3. Earth Cycles and Systems

ES.3.1. Create flowcharts that show the exchange of carbon and oxygen between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere, including carbon dioxide and methane. Explain how human activities such as farming and industry, temperature change in oceans, and natural processes such as volcanic eruptions can speed or slow the cycling from reservoirs within the solid earth and oceans into the atmosphere.
ES.3.3. Analyze and explain how events on one side of the world can alter temperature and precipitation around the globe. Analyze and explain the possible effects of natural and human-driven processes on our atmosphere and climate.
ES.3.4. Evaluate the use of sustainable versus nonrenewable resources. Explain the consequences of overuse and continued increased consumption of limited resources. Analyze and evaluate the benefits of researching, designing, and developing sustainable resources for private use and industry.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

ES.4. The Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

ES.4.1. Create a model that shows the composition, distribution, and circulation of gases in Earth's atmosphere. Show how carbon and oxygen cycles affect the composition through gas exchange with organisms, oceans, the solid earth, and industry.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.2. Create models to demonstrate the circulation, retention, and reflection of heat in regards to the atmosphere, solid land, and bodies of water including lakes and oceans. Demonstrate the effects of cities, various terrain, cloud cover, sea ice, and open water on albedo. Examine local and global heat exchanges, including land & sea breezes, lake effects, urban heat islands, and thermohaline circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.3. Create a presentation that demonstrates the process of the water cycle on both local and global scales. Illustrate the process of water cycling both from the solid earth to the atmosphere and around the solid earth. Examine the interaction of ground water, surface water, and ocean circulation. Illustrate the effects of human activity on water systems.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.4. Create a model to demonstrate how the Coriolis Effect influences the global circulation of the atmosphere. Explain how changes in the circulation of the atmosphere and oceans can create events such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.5. Chart and explain the changes in weather as it relates to humidity, air pressure, and temperature. Explain how these factors result in local wind patterns and cloud cover. Explain the origin, life cycle, and behavior of weather systems, especially severe weather. Create an emergency plan for severe storms, both summer and winter.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.6. Differentiate between weather and climate. Examine long term, natural climate change and periods of glaciation as influenced by Milankovitch Cycles due to the gravity of other solar system bodies (obliquity and precession of axis and eccentricity of orbit). Explain how these are different from any short term (less than thousands of years) changes to climate.

ES.5. The Solid Earth

ES.5.1. Construct a lab to analyze minerals based on their physical and chemical properties. Explain how rocks may contain many minerals, one mineral, or no minerals, and minerals can be made of either single elements (such as gold) or compounds (such as silicates).
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ES.5.2. Create a rock cycle flowchart or diagram that demonstrates the processes involved in the formation, breakdown, and reformation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock. Show how each type can melt and reform igneous rock, undergo the various metamorphic processes, and undergo physical and chemical weathering to form sedimentary rock.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.3. Construct a model that demonstrates the difference between weathering, erosion, transportation of material, deposition, and new soil and sedimentary rock formation. Differentiate between types of physical and chemical weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.4. Differentiate between relative and absolute geological time. Detail how sedimentary rock can be dated based on relative-age dating and positioning, while igneous formations can be radiometrically dated. Differentiate between radiocarbon dating used for organic materials and other types of radiometric dating for inorganic rock formation.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ES.5.6. Create models or diagrams to show how plate movement and sea level changes have changed continental land masses over time. Include the creation and destruction of inland seas, sedimentary rock formations including evaporites and biochemical formations, and the shaping and destruction of surface features.

ES.6. Earth Processes

ES.6.1. Construct a diagram or model that identifies and describes the physical and chemical properties of the crust, mantle, outer core, and inner core of Earth.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.6.2. Explain how Earth's fluid outer core creates the magnetosphere and how this helps protect both humans and technology (such as satellites) from solar winds.
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
ES.6.3. Construct a diagram and explanation showing the convection of Earth's mantle and its impact on the movements of tectonic plates. Explain how the decay of radioactive isotopes and residual energy from Earth's original formation provide the heat to fuel this convective process, which, along with ridge push and slab pull, drive the movements of tectonic plates.
E.S.6.4. Create a timeline to show the development of modern tectonic plate theory. Identify and explain how the evidence from the theory of continental drift, seafloor spreading, and paleomagnetism built upon each other to support tectonic plate theory.
E.S.6.5. Create models that demonstrate different types of orogeny resulting from plate tectonics. Show how the interactions between oceanic and continental plates create different geological features (such as volcanic island arcs or high altitude plateaus) depending on what types of plates are involved in the motions along different plate boundaries.
E.S.6.6. Create models and differentiate between shield, composite, and cinder cone volcanoes. Explain how volcanoes form, how the chemical composition of lava affects the type of volcanoes formed, and how the location (such as hot spots or along continental or oceanic margins) can affect the types of magma present.
E.S.6.7. Use models, diagrams, and captions to explain how tectonic motion creates earthquakes and tsunamis. Using resources such as indianamap.org, analyze how close the school is to known faults and liquefaction potential. Differentiate between intraplate fault zones such as the Wabash Valley Fault System and the more commonly discussed faults along tectonic margins.
E.S.6.8. Create an action plan detailing what to do in an emergency if an earthquake occurred near the school or home. Detail what should be kept in an earthquake preparation kit, how to prepare homes for earthquake safety, and what actions should be taken during and after an earthquake to ensure personal safety.

IN.ENV. Environmental Science (ENV)

Env.1. Environmental Systems

Env.1.4. Diagram the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water and describe the human impacts on each.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.1.6. Describe the difference between weather and climate. Locate, identify, and describe the major Earth biomes. Explain how biomes are determined by climate (temperature and precipitation patterns) that support specific kinds of plants.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.1.9. Describe how weather can be influenced by global climatic patterns, such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.2. Flow of Matter and Energy

Env.2.1. Describe how matter cycles through sources and sinks and how energy is transferred. Explain how matter and energy move between and within components of an environmental system.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.2.11. Recognize and describe the role of natural resources in providing the raw materials for an industrial society.
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2

Env.3. Natural Disasters

Env.3.1. Identify and describe geomorphic processes controlled by tectonics (i.e. volcanic activity, uplift, and shaping of landforms).
Env.3.2. Identify and describe tornado formation with the use of a weather map.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.3. Read and describe a weather map in terms of pressure systems, fronts, and changing weather patterns.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.4. Identify natural Earth hazards, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and identify the regions in which they occur as well as the short-term and long-term effects on the environment and on people.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.5. Biodiversity

Env.5.5. Identify the indirect and direct threats to biodiversity (e.g. habitat loss and destruction, invasion by exotic species, commercial over fishing and hunting, pollution, climate change, and bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxins).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.7. Pollution

Env.7.2. Differentiate between natural pollution and pollution caused by humans.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.7.5. Identify and describe the major air pollutants and their sources and impacts on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.8. Natural and Anthropogenic Resource Cycles

Env.8.5. Describe and examine how water is controlled in developed and undeveloped nations.

IN.ICP. Integrated Chemistry and Physics (ICP)

ICP.1. Constant Velocity

ICP.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a constant velocity and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
ICP.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object moving in one dimension.
ICP.1.3. Distinguish between the terms “distance” and “displacement,” and determine the value of either given a graphical or mathematical representation of position vs. clock reading (time).
ICP.1.4. Distinguish between the terms “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and determine the value of any of these measurements given either a graphical or mathematical representation.

ICP.2. Uniform Acceleration

ICP.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a constant acceleration and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object in terms of its change in position or velocity.
ICP.2.2. Describe the differences between average velocity and instantaneous velocity and be able to determine either quantity given a graph of position vs clock reading (time).

ICP.3. Newton’s Laws of Motion (One Dimension)

ICP.3.1. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a single external applied force changes the velocity of an object, and that when no force acts, the velocity of an object remains constant.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
ICP.3.3. Distinguish between forces acting on a body and forces exerted by the body. Categorize forces as contact forces, friction, or action at a distance (field) forces.
ICP.3.4. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a non-zero net force on an object results in an acceleration of the object and that the acceleration of an object of constant mass is proportional to the total force acting on it, and inversely proportional to its mass for a constant applied total force.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

ICP.4. Energy

ICP.4.2. Identify forms of energy present in a system (kinetic, gravitational, elastic, etc.), and pictorially represent the distribution of energies, such as using pie or bar charts.

ICP.8. Electricity and Magnetism

ICP.8.1. Describe electrical current in terms of the motion of electrons within a device and relate the rate of motion of the electrons to the amount of current measured.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
ICP.8.2. Describe the relationship among voltage, current, and resistance for an electrical system consisting of a single voltage source and a single device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

ICP.9. Waves

ICP.9.1. Develop qualitative particle models of mechanical waves and explain the relationship of the particles and their interactions in transverse and longitudinal waves, as well as, how waves appear in nature as in water waves and tsunamis, ground waves in earth quakes, and sound waves.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ICP.9.3. Qualitatively describe the reflection and transmission of a mechanical wave at either a fixed or free boundary or interface.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
ICP.9.4. Describe how interacting waves produce different phenomena than singular waves in a medium (e.g. periodic changes in volume of sound or resonance).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

IN.PI. Physics I (PI)

PI.1. Constant Velocity

PI.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a uniform rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object.
PI.1.3. Rank the velocities of objects in a system based on the slope of a position vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative velocity can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive velocity.
PI.1.4. Describe the differences between the terms “distance,” “displacement,” “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and be able to calculate any of those values given an object moving at a single constant velocity or with different constant velocities over a given time interval.

PI.2. Constant Acceleration

PI.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a uniformly changing rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.2.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of velocity vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the acceleration of the object.
PI.2.3. Rank the accelerations of objects in a system based on the slope of a velocity vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative acceleration can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.2.4. Given a graphical representation of the position, velocity, or acceleration vs. clock reading (time), be able to identify or sketch the shape of the other two graphs.
PI.2.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the models of constant velocity and constant acceleration to determine the position or velocity of an object moving in free fall near the surface of the Earth.

PI.3. Forces

PI.3.1. Understand Newton’s first law of motion and describe the motion of an object in the absence of a net external force according to Newton’s first law.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.3.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the inertial mass of an object, the total force applied, and the acceleration of an object in one dimension where one or more forces is applied to the object and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how a net external force changes the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.4. Energy

PI.4.1. Evaluate the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in simple situations using the mathematical definitions of these quantities and mathematically relate the initial and final values of the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in the absence of a net external force.
PI.4.2. Identify the forms of energy present in a scenario and recognize that the potential energy associated with a system of objects and is not stored in the object itself.
PI.4.6. Develop and apply pictorial, mathematical or graphical representations to qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in the mechanical energy (e.g. translational kinetic, gravitational, or elastic potential) of a system due to changes in position or speed of objects or non-conservative interactions within the system.

PI.6. Simple Harmonic Oscillating Systems

PI.6.1. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of stretch of a spring and the restoring force and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the stretch or compression will affect the restoring force and vice versa, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of restoring force vs. change in length of an elastic material in terms of the elastic constant of the material, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the mass, elastic constant, and period of a simple horizontal mass-spring system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the mass or elastic constant will affect the period of the system for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.7. Mechanical Waves and Sound

PI.7.1. Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal modes of oscillation for a mechanical wave traveling in one dimension.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

PI.8. Simple Circuit Analysis

PI.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations that describe the relationship between length, cross-sectional area, and resistivity of an ohmic device and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the composition, size, or shape of the device affect the resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of resistance vs. the ratio of length to cross-sectional area in terms of the resistivity of the material.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.4. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple series (i.e. loop) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.6. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple parallel (i.e. ladder) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.9. Use a description or schematic diagram of an electrical circuit to calculate unknown values of current, voltage, or resistance in various components or branches of the circuit according to Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s junction rule, and Kirchhoff’s loop rule.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

IN.PII. Physics II (PII)

PII.5. Simple and Complex Circuits

PII.5.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law. Apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa for an ohmic device of known resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.3. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PII.5.4. Define and describe a device as ohmic or non-ohmic based on the relationship between the current passing through the device and the voltage across the device based on the shape of the curve of a current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current graphical representation.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.5. Explain and analyze simple arrangements of electrical components in series and parallel DC circuits in terms of current, resistance, voltage and power. Use Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws to analyze DC circuits.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.7. Electromagnetic Induction

PII.7.3. Apply Ohm’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and Lenz’s Law to determine the amount and direction of current induced by a changing magnetic flux in a loop of wire or simple loop circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.8. Geometric Optics

PII.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance and the object distance for planar, converging, and diverging mirrors and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.2. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationship between the angles of incidence and refraction of monochromatic light passed between two different media and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle of incidence affects the angle of refraction.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.3. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance, and the object distance for both converging and diverging lenses and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3

PII.9. Particle and Wave Nature of Light

PII.9.1. Develop the relationship among frequency, wavelength, and energy for electromagnetic waves across the entire spectrum.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PII.9.2. Explain how electromagnetic waves interact with matter both as particles (i.e. photons) and as waves and be able to apply the most appropriate model to any particular scenario.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

IN.B. Biology (B)

B.5. Evolution

B.5.6. Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record and molecular data that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

IN.ES. Earth and Space Science (ES)

ES.1. The Universe

ES.1.2. Describe the expanding universe theory, also known as the "Big Bang Theory," based on observed astronomical evidence including: The Doppler Effect, red shift, Hubble's Law, and the cosmic microwave background.
ES.1.3. Create a diagram, flowchart, or written explanation that details the cooling of energy into protons and early elements, and early elements into superstars and galaxies. Explain the role of gravitational attraction in the formation of stars and galaxies from clouds of these early elements.
ES.1.4. Differentiate between the life cycles of stars of different masses found on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. Differentiate between low, medium (including our sun), and high mass stars by what elements can be produced, and therefore whether or not they can achieve red giant phase or go supernova.
ES.1.5. Illustrate the hierarchical relationship and scales of stars, planetary systems including multiple-star systems, star clusters, galaxies, and galactic groups in the universe.

ES.2. The Solar System

ES.2.1. Construct a flowchart with diagrams and descriptions outlining the nebular theory of solar system formation. Include the formation of one or more stars, planetesimals, protoplanets, Jovian and terrestrial planets, and other objects including satellites and small bodies.
ES.2.2. Describe the characteristics of the various kinds of objects in the solar system including planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, and protoplanets. Recognize that planets have been identified orbiting stars other than the sun, or exist outside of solar systems orbiting no sun at all. Describe the organization of our solar system including terrestrial and Jovian planets, asteroid belts, and the Oort Cloud.
ES.2.3. Develop a model illustrating the layers and life span of the sun. Explain how nuclear fusion in the core produces elements and energy, which are both retained through convection and released to space, including Earth, through radiation. Additionally, elements heavier than iron cannot form in stars, and form only as a result of supernovae.
ES.2.4. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to demonstrate the motions of the various kinds of objects in our solar system including planets, satellites, comets, and asteroids. Explain that Kepler’s Laws determine the orbits of those objects and know that Kepler’s Laws are a direct consequence of Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation together with his laws of motion.
ES.2.5. Explain how scientific theory changes over time with the introduction of new information and observational data. Use works from ancient Greeks such as Ptolemy, and other astronomers including Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo to demonstrate the effect of observational data and scientific discussion on our understanding of the mechanics and motion of our solar system.

ES.3. Earth Cycles and Systems

ES.3.1. Create flowcharts that show the exchange of carbon and oxygen between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere, including carbon dioxide and methane. Explain how human activities such as farming and industry, temperature change in oceans, and natural processes such as volcanic eruptions can speed or slow the cycling from reservoirs within the solid earth and oceans into the atmosphere.
ES.3.3. Analyze and explain how events on one side of the world can alter temperature and precipitation around the globe. Analyze and explain the possible effects of natural and human-driven processes on our atmosphere and climate.
ES.3.4. Evaluate the use of sustainable versus nonrenewable resources. Explain the consequences of overuse and continued increased consumption of limited resources. Analyze and evaluate the benefits of researching, designing, and developing sustainable resources for private use and industry.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

ES.4. The Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

ES.4.1. Create a model that shows the composition, distribution, and circulation of gases in Earth's atmosphere. Show how carbon and oxygen cycles affect the composition through gas exchange with organisms, oceans, the solid earth, and industry.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.2. Create models to demonstrate the circulation, retention, and reflection of heat in regards to the atmosphere, solid land, and bodies of water including lakes and oceans. Demonstrate the effects of cities, various terrain, cloud cover, sea ice, and open water on albedo. Examine local and global heat exchanges, including land & sea breezes, lake effects, urban heat islands, and thermohaline circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.3. Create a presentation that demonstrates the process of the water cycle on both local and global scales. Illustrate the process of water cycling both from the solid earth to the atmosphere and around the solid earth. Examine the interaction of ground water, surface water, and ocean circulation. Illustrate the effects of human activity on water systems.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.4. Create a model to demonstrate how the Coriolis Effect influences the global circulation of the atmosphere. Explain how changes in the circulation of the atmosphere and oceans can create events such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ES.4.5. Chart and explain the changes in weather as it relates to humidity, air pressure, and temperature. Explain how these factors result in local wind patterns and cloud cover. Explain the origin, life cycle, and behavior of weather systems, especially severe weather. Create an emergency plan for severe storms, both summer and winter.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.4.6. Differentiate between weather and climate. Examine long term, natural climate change and periods of glaciation as influenced by Milankovitch Cycles due to the gravity of other solar system bodies (obliquity and precession of axis and eccentricity of orbit). Explain how these are different from any short term (less than thousands of years) changes to climate.

ES.5. The Solid Earth

ES.5.1. Construct a lab to analyze minerals based on their physical and chemical properties. Explain how rocks may contain many minerals, one mineral, or no minerals, and minerals can be made of either single elements (such as gold) or compounds (such as silicates).
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ES.5.2. Create a rock cycle flowchart or diagram that demonstrates the processes involved in the formation, breakdown, and reformation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock. Show how each type can melt and reform igneous rock, undergo the various metamorphic processes, and undergo physical and chemical weathering to form sedimentary rock.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.3. Construct a model that demonstrates the difference between weathering, erosion, transportation of material, deposition, and new soil and sedimentary rock formation. Differentiate between types of physical and chemical weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.5.4. Differentiate between relative and absolute geological time. Detail how sedimentary rock can be dated based on relative-age dating and positioning, while igneous formations can be radiometrically dated. Differentiate between radiocarbon dating used for organic materials and other types of radiometric dating for inorganic rock formation.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ES.5.6. Create models or diagrams to show how plate movement and sea level changes have changed continental land masses over time. Include the creation and destruction of inland seas, sedimentary rock formations including evaporites and biochemical formations, and the shaping and destruction of surface features.

ES.6. Earth Processes

ES.6.1. Construct a diagram or model that identifies and describes the physical and chemical properties of the crust, mantle, outer core, and inner core of Earth.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ES.6.2. Explain how Earth's fluid outer core creates the magnetosphere and how this helps protect both humans and technology (such as satellites) from solar winds.
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
ES.6.3. Construct a diagram and explanation showing the convection of Earth's mantle and its impact on the movements of tectonic plates. Explain how the decay of radioactive isotopes and residual energy from Earth's original formation provide the heat to fuel this convective process, which, along with ridge push and slab pull, drive the movements of tectonic plates.
E.S.6.4. Create a timeline to show the development of modern tectonic plate theory. Identify and explain how the evidence from the theory of continental drift, seafloor spreading, and paleomagnetism built upon each other to support tectonic plate theory.
E.S.6.5. Create models that demonstrate different types of orogeny resulting from plate tectonics. Show how the interactions between oceanic and continental plates create different geological features (such as volcanic island arcs or high altitude plateaus) depending on what types of plates are involved in the motions along different plate boundaries.
E.S.6.6. Create models and differentiate between shield, composite, and cinder cone volcanoes. Explain how volcanoes form, how the chemical composition of lava affects the type of volcanoes formed, and how the location (such as hot spots or along continental or oceanic margins) can affect the types of magma present.
E.S.6.7. Use models, diagrams, and captions to explain how tectonic motion creates earthquakes and tsunamis. Using resources such as indianamap.org, analyze how close the school is to known faults and liquefaction potential. Differentiate between intraplate fault zones such as the Wabash Valley Fault System and the more commonly discussed faults along tectonic margins.
E.S.6.8. Create an action plan detailing what to do in an emergency if an earthquake occurred near the school or home. Detail what should be kept in an earthquake preparation kit, how to prepare homes for earthquake safety, and what actions should be taken during and after an earthquake to ensure personal safety.

IN.ENV. Environmental Science (ENV)

Env.1. Environmental Systems

Env.1.4. Diagram the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water and describe the human impacts on each.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.1.6. Describe the difference between weather and climate. Locate, identify, and describe the major Earth biomes. Explain how biomes are determined by climate (temperature and precipitation patterns) that support specific kinds of plants.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.1.9. Describe how weather can be influenced by global climatic patterns, such as El Niño and La Niña.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.2. Flow of Matter and Energy

Env.2.1. Describe how matter cycles through sources and sinks and how energy is transferred. Explain how matter and energy move between and within components of an environmental system.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Env.2.11. Recognize and describe the role of natural resources in providing the raw materials for an industrial society.
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2

Env.3. Natural Disasters

Env.3.1. Identify and describe geomorphic processes controlled by tectonics (i.e. volcanic activity, uplift, and shaping of landforms).
Env.3.2. Identify and describe tornado formation with the use of a weather map.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.3. Read and describe a weather map in terms of pressure systems, fronts, and changing weather patterns.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.3.4. Identify natural Earth hazards, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and identify the regions in which they occur as well as the short-term and long-term effects on the environment and on people.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.5. Biodiversity

Env.5.5. Identify the indirect and direct threats to biodiversity (e.g. habitat loss and destruction, invasion by exotic species, commercial over fishing and hunting, pollution, climate change, and bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxins).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Env.7. Pollution

Env.7.2. Differentiate between natural pollution and pollution caused by humans.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Env.7.5. Identify and describe the major air pollutants and their sources and impacts on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Env.8. Natural and Anthropogenic Resource Cycles

Env.8.5. Describe and examine how water is controlled in developed and undeveloped nations.

IN.ICP. Integrated Chemistry and Physics (ICP)

ICP.1. Constant Velocity

ICP.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a constant velocity and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
ICP.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object moving in one dimension.
ICP.1.3. Distinguish between the terms “distance” and “displacement,” and determine the value of either given a graphical or mathematical representation of position vs. clock reading (time).
ICP.1.4. Distinguish between the terms “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and determine the value of any of these measurements given either a graphical or mathematical representation.

ICP.2. Uniform Acceleration

ICP.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (such as a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a constant acceleration and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object in terms of its change in position or velocity.
ICP.2.2. Describe the differences between average velocity and instantaneous velocity and be able to determine either quantity given a graph of position vs clock reading (time).

ICP.3. Newton’s Laws of Motion (One Dimension)

ICP.3.1. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a single external applied force changes the velocity of an object, and that when no force acts, the velocity of an object remains constant.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
ICP.3.3. Distinguish between forces acting on a body and forces exerted by the body. Categorize forces as contact forces, friction, or action at a distance (field) forces.
ICP.3.4. Develop pictorial and graphical representations which show that a non-zero net force on an object results in an acceleration of the object and that the acceleration of an object of constant mass is proportional to the total force acting on it, and inversely proportional to its mass for a constant applied total force.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

ICP.4. Energy

ICP.4.2. Identify forms of energy present in a system (kinetic, gravitational, elastic, etc.), and pictorially represent the distribution of energies, such as using pie or bar charts.

ICP.8. Electricity and Magnetism

ICP.8.1. Describe electrical current in terms of the motion of electrons within a device and relate the rate of motion of the electrons to the amount of current measured.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
ICP.8.2. Describe the relationship among voltage, current, and resistance for an electrical system consisting of a single voltage source and a single device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

ICP.9. Waves

ICP.9.1. Develop qualitative particle models of mechanical waves and explain the relationship of the particles and their interactions in transverse and longitudinal waves, as well as, how waves appear in nature as in water waves and tsunamis, ground waves in earth quakes, and sound waves.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ICP.9.3. Qualitatively describe the reflection and transmission of a mechanical wave at either a fixed or free boundary or interface.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
ICP.9.4. Describe how interacting waves produce different phenomena than singular waves in a medium (e.g. periodic changes in volume of sound or resonance).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

IN.PI. Physics I (PI)

PI.1. Constant Velocity

PI.1.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a uniform rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.1.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object.
PI.1.3. Rank the velocities of objects in a system based on the slope of a position vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative velocity can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive velocity.
PI.1.4. Describe the differences between the terms “distance,” “displacement,” “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and be able to calculate any of those values given an object moving at a single constant velocity or with different constant velocities over a given time interval.

PI.2. Constant Acceleration

PI.2.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a uniformly changing rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.
PI.2.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of velocity vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the acceleration of the object.
PI.2.3. Rank the accelerations of objects in a system based on the slope of a velocity vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative acceleration can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.2.4. Given a graphical representation of the position, velocity, or acceleration vs. clock reading (time), be able to identify or sketch the shape of the other two graphs.
PI.2.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the models of constant velocity and constant acceleration to determine the position or velocity of an object moving in free fall near the surface of the Earth.

PI.3. Forces

PI.3.1. Understand Newton’s first law of motion and describe the motion of an object in the absence of a net external force according to Newton’s first law.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.3.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the inertial mass of an object, the total force applied, and the acceleration of an object in one dimension where one or more forces is applied to the object and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how a net external force changes the motion of an object.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.4. Energy

PI.4.1. Evaluate the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in simple situations using the mathematical definitions of these quantities and mathematically relate the initial and final values of the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in the absence of a net external force.
PI.4.2. Identify the forms of energy present in a scenario and recognize that the potential energy associated with a system of objects and is not stored in the object itself.
PI.4.6. Develop and apply pictorial, mathematical or graphical representations to qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in the mechanical energy (e.g. translational kinetic, gravitational, or elastic potential) of a system due to changes in position or speed of objects or non-conservative interactions within the system.

PI.6. Simple Harmonic Oscillating Systems

PI.6.1. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of stretch of a spring and the restoring force and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the stretch or compression will affect the restoring force and vice versa, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of restoring force vs. change in length of an elastic material in terms of the elastic constant of the material, specifically for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PI.6.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the mass, elastic constant, and period of a simple horizontal mass-spring system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the mass or elastic constant will affect the period of the system for an ideal spring.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4

PI.7. Mechanical Waves and Sound

PI.7.1. Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal modes of oscillation for a mechanical wave traveling in one dimension.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

PI.8. Simple Circuit Analysis

PI.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations that describe the relationship between length, cross-sectional area, and resistivity of an ohmic device and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the composition, size, or shape of the device affect the resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.2. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of resistance vs. the ratio of length to cross-sectional area in terms of the resistivity of the material.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.3. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.4. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.5. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple series (i.e. loop) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PI.8.6. Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple parallel (i.e. ladder) circuit affects the voltage, current, and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PI.8.9. Use a description or schematic diagram of an electrical circuit to calculate unknown values of current, voltage, or resistance in various components or branches of the circuit according to Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s junction rule, and Kirchhoff’s loop rule.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

IN.PII. Physics II (PII)

PII.5. Simple and Complex Circuits

PII.5.2. Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law. Apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa for an ohmic device of known resistance.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.3. Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PII.5.4. Define and describe a device as ohmic or non-ohmic based on the relationship between the current passing through the device and the voltage across the device based on the shape of the curve of a current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current graphical representation.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PII.5.5. Explain and analyze simple arrangements of electrical components in series and parallel DC circuits in terms of current, resistance, voltage and power. Use Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws to analyze DC circuits.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.7. Electromagnetic Induction

PII.7.3. Apply Ohm’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and Lenz’s Law to determine the amount and direction of current induced by a changing magnetic flux in a loop of wire or simple loop circuit.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

PII.8. Geometric Optics

PII.8.1. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance and the object distance for planar, converging, and diverging mirrors and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.2. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationship between the angles of incidence and refraction of monochromatic light passed between two different media and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle of incidence affects the angle of refraction.
Optics
Worksheets :3
PII.8.3. Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance, and the object distance for both converging and diverging lenses and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance.
Optics
Worksheets :3

PII.9. Particle and Wave Nature of Light

PII.9.1. Develop the relationship among frequency, wavelength, and energy for electromagnetic waves across the entire spectrum.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PII.9.2. Explain how electromagnetic waves interact with matter both as particles (i.e. photons) and as waves and be able to apply the most appropriate model to any particular scenario.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
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