Florida Standards for High School Physics

Forces and MotionMotion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2
Light and OpticsWorksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 3
OpticsWorksheets: 3

FL.SC.912.N. Nature of Science

SC.912.N.1. The Practice of Science - A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of ''the scientific method.'' C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge. D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

SC.912.N.1.1. Define a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following:
SC.912.N.1.1.6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs)
The science of biologyThe processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
SC.912.N.1.2. Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.
The science of biologyThe processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3

SC.912.N.2. The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge - A: Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion. B: Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change. C: Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

SC.912.N.2.1. Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).

FL.SC.912.E. Earth and Space Science

SC.912.E.5. Earth in Space and Time - The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the development and life cycles of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, Earth, and residual material left from the formation of the Solar System. Humankind's need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.

SC.912.E.5.1. Cite evidence used to develop and verify the scientific theory of the Big Bang (also known as the Big Bang Theory) of the origin of the universe.
SC.912.E.5.2. Identify patterns in the organization and distribution of matter in the universe and the forces that determine them.
SC.912.E.5.3. Describe and predict how the initial mass of a star determines its evolution.
SC.912.E.5.4. Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and events on Earth.
SC.912.E.5.5. Explain the formation of planetary systems based on our knowledge of our Solar System and apply this knowledge to newly discovered planetary systems.
SC.912.E.5.6. Develop logical connections through physical principles, including Kepler's and Newton's Laws about the relationships and the effects of Earth, Moon, and Sun on each other.

SC.912.E.6. Earth Structures - The scientific theory of plate tectonics provides the framework for much of modern geology. Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.

SC.912.E.6.1. Describe and differentiate the layers of Earth and the interactions among them.
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.2. Connect surface features to surface processes that are responsible for their formation.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.3. Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and identify related major processes and features as a result of moving plates.
SC.912.E.6.4. Analyze how specific geologic processes and features are expressed in Florida and elsewhere.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

SC.912.E.7. Earth Systems and Patterns - The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.

SC.912.E.7.1. Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.2. Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and deep water motion within the oceans and their impacts on the transfer of energy between the poles and the equator.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.3. Differentiate and describe the various interactions among Earth systems, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.4. Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate of a geographic area, including the relationships to lakes and oceans.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.5. Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.6. Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.7. Identify, analyze, and relate the internal (Earth system) and external (astronomical) conditions that contribute to global climate change.
SC.912.E.7.9. Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and moving heat, carbon, and water.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.P. Physical Science

SC.912.P.8. Matter - A. A working definition of matter is that it takes up space, has mass, and has measurable properties. Matter is comprised of atomic, subatomic, and elementary particles. B. Electrons are key to defining chemical and some physical properties, reactivity, and molecular structures. Repeating (periodic) patterns of physical and chemical properties occur among elements that define groups of elements with similar properties. The periodic table displays the repeating patterns, which are related to the atom's outermost electrons. Atoms bond with each other to form compounds. C. In a chemical reaction, one or more reactants are transformed into one or more new products. Many factors shape the nature of products and the rates of reaction. D. Carbon-based compounds are building-blocks of known life forms on earth and numerous useful natural and synthetic products.

SC.912.P.8.1. Differentiate among the four states of matter.
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.8.2. Differentiate between physical and chemical properties and physical and chemical changes of matter.
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.8.4. Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and differentiate among these particles in terms of their mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.
MagnetismWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.8.5. Relate properties of atoms and their position in the periodic table to the arrangement of their electrons.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.8.6. Distinguish between bonding forces holding compounds together and other attractive forces, including hydrogen bonding and Van Der Waals forces.
SC.912.P.8.7. Interpret formula representations of molecules and compounds in terms of composition and structure.
SC.912.P.8.8. Characterize types of chemical reactions, for example: redox, acid-base, synthesis, and single and double replacement reactions.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
SC.912.P.8.10. Describe oxidation-reduction reactions in living and non-living systems.
SC.912.P.8.11. Relate acidity and basicity to hydronium and hydroxyl ion concentration and pH.
Acids, Bases and SaltsFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1
SC.912.P.8.12. Describe the properties of the carbon atom that make the diversity of carbon compounds possible.
Organic ChemistryWorksheets :3

SC.912.P.10. Energy - A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc 2 . B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion. C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy. D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields. E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

SC.912.P.10.1. Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
HeatWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.3. Compare and contrast work and power qualitatively and quantitatively.
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.4. Describe heat as the energy transferred by convection, conduction, and radiation, and explain the connection of heat to change in temperature or states of matter.
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.5. Relate temperature to the average molecular kinetic energy.
GasesWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.6. Create and interpret potential energy diagrams, for example: chemical reactions, orbits around a central body, motion of a pendulum.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
HeatWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.7. Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic chemical processes.
SC.912.P.10.9. Describe the quantization of energy at the atomic level.
SC.912.P.10.10. Compare the magnitude and range of the four fundamental forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, strong nuclear).
SC.912.P.10.11. Explain and compare nuclear reactions (radioactive decay, fission and fusion), the energy changes associated with them and their associated safety issues.
Nuclear ChemistryWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.12. Differentiate between chemical and nuclear reactions.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
SC.912.P.10.13. Relate the configuration of static charges to the electric field, electric force, electric potential, and electric potential energy.
SC.912.P.10.14. Differentiate among conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.15. Investigate and explain the relationships among current, voltage, resistance, and power.
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.16. Explain the relationship between moving charges and magnetic fields, as well as changing magnetic fields and electric fields, and their application to modern technologies.
MagnetismWorksheets :3
ElectromagnetismThe production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.18. Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy, and relate them to phenomena and applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
MagnetismWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.19. Explain that all objects emit and absorb electromagnetic radiation and distinguish between objects that are blackbody radiators and those that are not.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
MagnetismWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.20. Describe the measurable properties of waves and explain the relationships among them and how these properties change when the wave moves from one medium to another.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.21. Qualitatively describe the shift in frequency in sound or electromagnetic waves due to the relative motion of a source or a receiver.
SoundWorksheets :3

SC.912.P.12. Motion - A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. When objects travel at speeds comparable to the speed of light, Einstein's special theory of relativity applies. B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval. C. The Law of Universal Gravitation states that gravitational forces act on all objects irrespective of their size and position. D. Gases consist of great numbers of molecules moving in all directions. The behavior of gases can be modeled by the kinetic molecular theory. E. Chemical reaction rates change with conditions under which they occur. Chemical equilibrium is a dynamic state in which forward and reverse processes occur at the same rates.

SC.912.P.12.1. Distinguish between scalar and vector quantities and assess which should be used to describe an event.
SC.912.P.12.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.12.3. Interpret and apply Newton's three laws of motion.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.12.5. Apply the law of conservation of linear momentum to interactions, such as collisions between objects.
SC.912.P.12.7. Recognize that nothing travels faster than the speed of light in a vacuum which is the same for all observers no matter how they or the light source are moving.
LightWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.12.10. Interpret the behavior of ideal gases in terms of kinetic molecular theory.
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.11. Describe phase transitions in terms of kinetic molecular theory.
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.12.12. Explain how various factors, such as concentration, temperature, and presence of a catalyst affect the rate of a chemical reaction.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
SC.912.P.12.13. Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium in terms of reversible processes occurring at the same rates.
MechanicsWorksheets :3

FL.SC.912.L. Life Science

SC.912.L.14. Organization and Development of Living Organisms - A. Cells have characteristic structures and functions that make them distinctive. B. Processes in a cell can be classified broadly as growth, maintenance, reproduction, and homeostasis. C. Life can be organized in a functional and structural hierarchy ranging from cells to the biosphere. D. Most multicellular organisms are composed of organ systems whose structures reflect their particular function.

SC.912.L.14.1. Describe the scientific theory of cells (cell theory) and relate the history of its discovery to the process of science.
Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
SC.912.L.14.2. Relate structure to function for the components of plant and animal cells. Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active transport).
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.14.3. Compare and contrast the general structures of plant and animal cells. Compare and contrast the general structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.14.4. Compare and contrast structure and function of various types of microscopes.
Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
SC.912.L.14.6. Explain the significance of genetic factors, environmental factors, and pathogenic agents to health from the perspectives of both individual and public health.
DNA technology/genetic engineeringThis topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Microorganisms IHyphae - threadlike filaments of branching cells that make up the bodies of multicellular fungi. Gymnosperm - group of vascular plants that develop seeds without a protective outer covering; they do not produce flowers or fruit. Flagellum - a tail-like structure found on bacteria and select protists which helps them to move. Volvox - a freshwater, chlorophyll-containing green alga, that occurs in ball-shaped colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.14.7. Relate the structure of each of the major plant organs and tissues to physiological processes.
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
SC.912.L.14.9. Relate the major structure of fungi to their functions.
Microorganisms IITaxonomy is the classification of all known living organisms that shows relationships between different organisms. Pseudopod is false feet; temporary fingerlike projections a one-celled organism, such as an amoeba, uses to move. Protozoa - single-celled, animal-like protist that has the ability to move. Mycelium - a mass of fungal hyphae that absorbs nutrients. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.14.11. Classify and state the defining characteristics of epithelial tissue, connective tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.13. Distinguish between bones of the axial skeleton and the appendicular skeleton.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.14. Identify the major bones of the axial and appendicular skeleton.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.15. Identify major markings (such as foramina, fossae, tubercles, etc.) on a skeleton. Explain why these markings are important.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.16. Describe the anatomy and histology, including ultra structure, of muscle tissue.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.20. Identify the major muscles of the human on a model or diagram.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.21. Describe the anatomy, histology, and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems and name the major divisions of the nervous system.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.29. Define the terms endocrine and exocrine.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.30. Compare endocrine and neural controls of physiology.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.32. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.33. Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system.
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.36. Describe the factors affecting blood flow through the cardiovascular system.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.40. Describe the histology of the major arteries and veins of systemic, pulmonary, hepatic portal, and coronary circulation.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.43. Describe the histology of the respiratory system.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.44. Describe the physiology of the respiratory system including the mechanisms of ventilation, gas exchange, gas transport and the mechanisms that control the rate of ventilation.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.45. Describe the histology of the alimentary canal and its associated accessory organs.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.46. Describe the physiology of the digestive system, including mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, absorption and the neural and hormonal mechanisms of control.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.52. Explain the basic functions of the human immune system, including specific and nonspecific immune response, vaccines, and antibiotics.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.14.53. Discuss basic classification and characteristics of plants. Identify bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms.
Introduction to plantsWhich woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5

SC.912.L.15. Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms - A. The scientific theory of evolution is the fundamental concept underlying all of biology. B. The scientific theory of evolution is supported by multiple forms of scientific evidence. C. Organisms are classified based on their evolutionary history. D. Natural selection is a primary mechanism leading to evolutionary change.

SC.912.L.15.1. Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
SC.912.L.15.5. Explain the reasons for changes in how organisms are classified.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.L.15.6. Discuss distinguishing characteristics of the domains and kingdoms of living organisms.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Introduction to plantsWhich woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Microorganisms IITaxonomy is the classification of all known living organisms that shows relationships between different organisms. Pseudopod is false feet; temporary fingerlike projections a one-celled organism, such as an amoeba, uses to move. Protozoa - single-celled, animal-like protist that has the ability to move. Mycelium - a mass of fungal hyphae that absorbs nutrients. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.15.7. Discuss distinguishing characteristics of vertebrate and representative invertebrate phyla, and chordate classes using typical examples.
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
InvertebratesInvertebrates are animals that don't have a backbone. More than 90 percent of all living animal species are invertebrates. Familiar examples of invertebrates include arthropods, mollusks, annelid, and cnidarians. Like vertebrates, most invertebrates reproduce at least partly through sexual reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates IVertebrates - animals that have a backbone. The word comes from vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine. Five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. A few tens of thousands of species have been identified. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates IIA vertebrate is an animal with a spinal cord surrounded by cartilage or bone. The vertebrates are also characterized by a muscular system consisting primarily of bilaterally paired masses and a central nervous system partly enclosed within the backbone. The 7 classes of vertebrates are: Class Aves, Class Reptilia, Class Agnatha, Class Amphibia, Class Mammalia, Class Osteichthyes, Class Chondrichthyes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.15.8. Describe the scientific explanations of the origin of life on Earth.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.L.15.13. Describe the conditions required for natural selection, including: overproduction of offspring, inherited variation, and the struggle to survive, which result in differential reproductive success.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.L.15.15. Describe how mutation and genetic recombination increase genetic variation.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

SC.912.L.16. Heredity and Reproduction - A. DNA stores and transmits genetic information. Genes are sets of instructions encoded in the structure of DNA. B. Genetic information is passed from generation to generation by DNA in all organisms and accounts for similarities in related individuals. C. Manipulation of DNA in organisms has led to commercial production of biological molecules on a large scale and genetically modified organisms. D. Reproduction is characteristic of living things and is essential for the survival of species.

SC.912.L.16.1. Use Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment to analyze patterns of inheritance.
Genetics and heredity IHow many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.16.2. Discuss observed inheritance patterns caused by various modes of inheritance, including dominant, recessive, codominant, sex-linked, polygenic, and multiple alleles.
Genetics and heredity IHow many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.16.3. Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to the transmission and conservation of the genetic information.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.L.16.4. Explain how mutations in the DNA sequence may or may not result in phenotypic change. Explain how mutations in gametes may result in phenotypic changes in offspring.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.16.5. Explain the basic processes of transcription and translation, and how they result in the expression of genes.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.16.6. Discuss the mechanisms for regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcription and translation level.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.16.7. Describe how viruses and bacteria transfer genetic material between cells and the role of this process in biotechnology.
Microorganisms IHyphae - threadlike filaments of branching cells that make up the bodies of multicellular fungi. Gymnosperm - group of vascular plants that develop seeds without a protective outer covering; they do not produce flowers or fruit. Flagellum - a tail-like structure found on bacteria and select protists which helps them to move. Volvox - a freshwater, chlorophyll-containing green alga, that occurs in ball-shaped colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.16.9. Explain how and why the genetic code is universal and is common to almost all organisms.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.16.11. Discuss the technologies associated with forensic medicine and DNA identification, including restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.
DNA technology/genetic engineeringThis topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.16.13. Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the human reproductive system. Describe the process of human development from fertilization to birth and major changes that occur in each trimester of pregnancy.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.16.14. Describe the cell cycle, including the process of mitosis. Explain the role of mitosis in the formation of new cells and its importance in maintaining chromosome number during asexual reproduction.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.L.16.15. Compare and contrast binary fission and mitotic cell division.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.L.16.16. Describe the process of meiosis, including independent assortment and crossing over. Explain how reduction division results in the formation of haploid gametes or spores.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genetics and heredity IIBy whom were first described the principles of dominance, segregation, and independent assortment? What did Gregor Mendel discover using the results of his experiments with plant crosses? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Splindle fibers, Telophase, Trait, Transcription, Mutation, Phenotype. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.16.17. Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis and relate to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4

SC.912.L.17. Interdependence - A. The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between organisms, and between organisms and the non-living environment. B. Energy and nutrients move within and between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems via physical, chemical and biological processes. C. Human activities and natural events can have profound effects on populations, biodiversity and ecosystem processes.

SC.912.L.17.2. Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.3. Discuss how various oceanic and freshwater processes, such as currents, tides, and waves, affect the abundance of aquatic organisms.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.6. Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms, including predation, parasitism, competition, commensalism, and mutualism.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
SC.912.L.17.7. Characterize the biotic and abiotic components that define freshwater systems, marine systems and terrestrial systems.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.9. Use a food web to identify and distinguish producers, consumers, and decomposers. Explain the pathway of energy transfer through trophic levels and the reduction of available energy at successive trophic levels.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
SC.912.L.17.10. Diagram and explain the biogeochemical cycles of an ecosystem, including water, carbon, and nitrogen cycle.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

SC.912.L.18. Matter and Energy Transformations - A. All living things are composed of four basic categories of macromolecules and share the same basic needs for life. B. Living organisms acquire the energy they need for life processes through various metabolic pathways (primarily photosynthesis and cellular respiration). C. Chemical reactions in living things follow basic rules of chemistry and are usually regulated by enzymes. D. The unique chemical properties of carbon and water make life on Earth possible.

SC.912.L.18.1. Describe the basic molecular structures and primary functions of the four major categories of biological macromolecules.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.L.18.3. Describe the structures of fatty acids, triglycerides, phospholipids, and steroids. Explain the functions of lipids in living organisms. Identify some reactions that fatty acids undergo. Relate the structure and function of cell membranes.
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
SC.912.L.18.6. Discuss the role of anaerobic respiration in living things and in human society.
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.18.7. Identify the reactants, products, and basic functions of photosynthesis.
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
SC.912.L.18.8. Identify the reactants, products, and basic functions of aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration.
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
SC.912.L.18.9. Explain the interrelated nature of photosynthesis and cellular respiration.
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

FL.LAFS.910.RST. READING STANDARDS FOR LITERACY IN SCIENCE AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS 6-12

LAFS.910.RST.2. Craft and Structure

LAFS.910.RST.2.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

LAFS.910.RST.3. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

LAFS.910.RST.3.7. Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

FL.SC.912.N. Nature of Science

SC.912.N.1. The Practice of Science - A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of ''the scientific method.'' C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge. D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

SC.912.N.1.1. Define a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following:
SC.912.N.1.1.6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs)
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
SC.912.N.1.2. Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.

SC.912.N.2. The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge - A: Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion. B: Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change. C: Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

SC.912.N.2.1. Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).

FL.SC.912.E. Earth and Space Science

SC.912.E.5. Earth in Space and Time - The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the development and life cycles of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, Earth, and residual material left from the formation of the Solar System. Humankind's need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.

SC.912.E.5.1. Cite evidence used to develop and verify the scientific theory of the Big Bang (also known as the Big Bang Theory) of the origin of the universe.
SC.912.E.5.2. Identify patterns in the organization and distribution of matter in the universe and the forces that determine them.
SC.912.E.5.3. Describe and predict how the initial mass of a star determines its evolution.
SC.912.E.5.4. Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and events on Earth.
SC.912.E.5.5. Explain the formation of planetary systems based on our knowledge of our Solar System and apply this knowledge to newly discovered planetary systems.
SC.912.E.5.6. Develop logical connections through physical principles, including Kepler's and Newton's Laws about the relationships and the effects of Earth, Moon, and Sun on each other.

SC.912.E.6. Earth Structures - The scientific theory of plate tectonics provides the framework for much of modern geology. Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.

SC.912.E.6.1. Describe and differentiate the layers of Earth and the interactions among them.
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.2. Connect surface features to surface processes that are responsible for their formation.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.3. Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and identify related major processes and features as a result of moving plates.
SC.912.E.6.4. Analyze how specific geologic processes and features are expressed in Florida and elsewhere.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

SC.912.E.7. Earth Systems and Patterns - The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.

SC.912.E.7.1. Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.2. Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and deep water motion within the oceans and their impacts on the transfer of energy between the poles and the equator.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.3. Differentiate and describe the various interactions among Earth systems, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.4. Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate of a geographic area, including the relationships to lakes and oceans.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.5. Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.6. Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.7. Identify, analyze, and relate the internal (Earth system) and external (astronomical) conditions that contribute to global climate change.
SC.912.E.7.9. Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and moving heat, carbon, and water.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.P. Physical Science

SC.912.P.10. Energy - A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc 2 . B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion. C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy. D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields. E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

SC.912.P.10.1. Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
SC.912.P.10.6. Create and interpret potential energy diagrams, for example: chemical reactions, orbits around a central body, motion of a pendulum.
SC.912.P.10.10. Compare the magnitude and range of the four fundamental forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, strong nuclear).
SC.912.P.10.13. Relate the configuration of static charges to the electric field, electric force, electric potential, and electric potential energy.
SC.912.P.10.14. Differentiate among conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.15. Investigate and explain the relationships among current, voltage, resistance, and power.
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.18. Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy, and relate them to phenomena and applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.19. Explain that all objects emit and absorb electromagnetic radiation and distinguish between objects that are blackbody radiators and those that are not.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.20. Describe the measurable properties of waves and explain the relationships among them and how these properties change when the wave moves from one medium to another.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

SC.912.P.12. Motion - A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. When objects travel at speeds comparable to the speed of light, Einstein's special theory of relativity applies. B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval. C. The Law of Universal Gravitation states that gravitational forces act on all objects irrespective of their size and position. D. Gases consist of great numbers of molecules moving in all directions. The behavior of gases can be modeled by the kinetic molecular theory. E. Chemical reaction rates change with conditions under which they occur. Chemical equilibrium is a dynamic state in which forward and reverse processes occur at the same rates.

SC.912.P.12.1. Distinguish between scalar and vector quantities and assess which should be used to describe an event.
SC.912.P.12.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.3. Interpret and apply Newton's three laws of motion.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.13. Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium in terms of reversible processes occurring at the same rates.

FL.SC.912.L. Life Science

SC.912.L.15. Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms - A. The scientific theory of evolution is the fundamental concept underlying all of biology. B. The scientific theory of evolution is supported by multiple forms of scientific evidence. C. Organisms are classified based on their evolutionary history. D. Natural selection is a primary mechanism leading to evolutionary change.

SC.912.L.15.1. Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3

SC.912.L.17. Interdependence - A. The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between organisms, and between organisms and the non-living environment. B. Energy and nutrients move within and between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems via physical, chemical and biological processes. C. Human activities and natural events can have profound effects on populations, biodiversity and ecosystem processes.

SC.912.L.17.2. Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.3. Discuss how various oceanic and freshwater processes, such as currents, tides, and waves, affect the abundance of aquatic organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.7. Characterize the biotic and abiotic components that define freshwater systems, marine systems and terrestrial systems.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.N. Nature of Science

SC.912.N.1. The Practice of Science - A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of ''the scientific method.'' C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge. D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

SC.912.N.1.1. Define a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following:
SC.912.N.1.1.6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs)
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
SC.912.N.1.2. Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.

SC.912.N.2. The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge - A: Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion. B: Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change. C: Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

SC.912.N.2.1. Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).

FL.SC.912.E. Earth and Space Science

SC.912.E.5. Earth in Space and Time - The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the development and life cycles of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, Earth, and residual material left from the formation of the Solar System. Humankind's need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.

SC.912.E.5.1. Cite evidence used to develop and verify the scientific theory of the Big Bang (also known as the Big Bang Theory) of the origin of the universe.
SC.912.E.5.2. Identify patterns in the organization and distribution of matter in the universe and the forces that determine them.
SC.912.E.5.3. Describe and predict how the initial mass of a star determines its evolution.
SC.912.E.5.4. Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and events on Earth.
SC.912.E.5.5. Explain the formation of planetary systems based on our knowledge of our Solar System and apply this knowledge to newly discovered planetary systems.
SC.912.E.5.6. Develop logical connections through physical principles, including Kepler's and Newton's Laws about the relationships and the effects of Earth, Moon, and Sun on each other.

SC.912.E.6. Earth Structures - The scientific theory of plate tectonics provides the framework for much of modern geology. Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.

SC.912.E.6.1. Describe and differentiate the layers of Earth and the interactions among them.
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.2. Connect surface features to surface processes that are responsible for their formation.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.3. Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and identify related major processes and features as a result of moving plates.
SC.912.E.6.4. Analyze how specific geologic processes and features are expressed in Florida and elsewhere.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

SC.912.E.7. Earth Systems and Patterns - The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.

SC.912.E.7.1. Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.2. Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and deep water motion within the oceans and their impacts on the transfer of energy between the poles and the equator.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.3. Differentiate and describe the various interactions among Earth systems, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.4. Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate of a geographic area, including the relationships to lakes and oceans.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.5. Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.6. Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.7. Identify, analyze, and relate the internal (Earth system) and external (astronomical) conditions that contribute to global climate change.
SC.912.E.7.9. Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and moving heat, carbon, and water.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.P. Physical Science

SC.912.P.8. Matter - A. A working definition of matter is that it takes up space, has mass, and has measurable properties. Matter is comprised of atomic, subatomic, and elementary particles. B. Electrons are key to defining chemical and some physical properties, reactivity, and molecular structures. Repeating (periodic) patterns of physical and chemical properties occur among elements that define groups of elements with similar properties. The periodic table displays the repeating patterns, which are related to the atom's outermost electrons. Atoms bond with each other to form compounds. C. In a chemical reaction, one or more reactants are transformed into one or more new products. Many factors shape the nature of products and the rates of reaction. D. Carbon-based compounds are building-blocks of known life forms on earth and numerous useful natural and synthetic products.

SC.912.P.8.6. Distinguish between bonding forces holding compounds together and other attractive forces, including hydrogen bonding and Van Der Waals forces.
SC.912.P.8.7. Interpret formula representations of molecules and compounds in terms of composition and structure.

SC.912.P.10. Energy - A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc 2 . B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion. C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy. D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields. E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

SC.912.P.10.1. Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
SC.912.P.10.6. Create and interpret potential energy diagrams, for example: chemical reactions, orbits around a central body, motion of a pendulum.
SC.912.P.10.10. Compare the magnitude and range of the four fundamental forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, strong nuclear).
SC.912.P.10.13. Relate the configuration of static charges to the electric field, electric force, electric potential, and electric potential energy.
SC.912.P.10.14. Differentiate among conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.15. Investigate and explain the relationships among current, voltage, resistance, and power.
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.18. Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy, and relate them to phenomena and applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.19. Explain that all objects emit and absorb electromagnetic radiation and distinguish between objects that are blackbody radiators and those that are not.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.20. Describe the measurable properties of waves and explain the relationships among them and how these properties change when the wave moves from one medium to another.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

SC.912.P.12. Motion - A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. When objects travel at speeds comparable to the speed of light, Einstein's special theory of relativity applies. B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval. C. The Law of Universal Gravitation states that gravitational forces act on all objects irrespective of their size and position. D. Gases consist of great numbers of molecules moving in all directions. The behavior of gases can be modeled by the kinetic molecular theory. E. Chemical reaction rates change with conditions under which they occur. Chemical equilibrium is a dynamic state in which forward and reverse processes occur at the same rates.

SC.912.P.12.1. Distinguish between scalar and vector quantities and assess which should be used to describe an event.
SC.912.P.12.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.3. Interpret and apply Newton's three laws of motion.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.13. Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium in terms of reversible processes occurring at the same rates.

FL.SC.912.L. Life Science

SC.912.L.15. Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms - A. The scientific theory of evolution is the fundamental concept underlying all of biology. B. The scientific theory of evolution is supported by multiple forms of scientific evidence. C. Organisms are classified based on their evolutionary history. D. Natural selection is a primary mechanism leading to evolutionary change.

SC.912.L.15.1. Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3

SC.912.L.17. Interdependence - A. The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between organisms, and between organisms and the non-living environment. B. Energy and nutrients move within and between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems via physical, chemical and biological processes. C. Human activities and natural events can have profound effects on populations, biodiversity and ecosystem processes.

SC.912.L.17.2. Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.3. Discuss how various oceanic and freshwater processes, such as currents, tides, and waves, affect the abundance of aquatic organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.7. Characterize the biotic and abiotic components that define freshwater systems, marine systems and terrestrial systems.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.LAFS.1112.RST. READING STANDARDS FOR LITERACY IN SCIENCE AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS 6-12

LAFS.1112.RST.2. Craft and Structure

LAFS.1112.RST.2.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.N. Nature of Science

SC.912.N.1. The Practice of Science - A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of ''the scientific method.'' C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge. D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

SC.912.N.1.1. Define a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following:
SC.912.N.1.1.6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs)
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
SC.912.N.1.2. Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.

SC.912.N.2. The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge - A: Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion. B: Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change. C: Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

SC.912.N.2.1. Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).

FL.SC.912.E. Earth and Space Science

SC.912.E.5. Earth in Space and Time - The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the development and life cycles of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, Earth, and residual material left from the formation of the Solar System. Humankind's need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.

SC.912.E.5.1. Cite evidence used to develop and verify the scientific theory of the Big Bang (also known as the Big Bang Theory) of the origin of the universe.
SC.912.E.5.2. Identify patterns in the organization and distribution of matter in the universe and the forces that determine them.
SC.912.E.5.3. Describe and predict how the initial mass of a star determines its evolution.
SC.912.E.5.4. Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and events on Earth.
SC.912.E.5.5. Explain the formation of planetary systems based on our knowledge of our Solar System and apply this knowledge to newly discovered planetary systems.
SC.912.E.5.6. Develop logical connections through physical principles, including Kepler's and Newton's Laws about the relationships and the effects of Earth, Moon, and Sun on each other.

SC.912.E.6. Earth Structures - The scientific theory of plate tectonics provides the framework for much of modern geology. Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.

SC.912.E.6.1. Describe and differentiate the layers of Earth and the interactions among them.
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.2. Connect surface features to surface processes that are responsible for their formation.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.6.3. Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and identify related major processes and features as a result of moving plates.
SC.912.E.6.4. Analyze how specific geologic processes and features are expressed in Florida and elsewhere.
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

SC.912.E.7. Earth Systems and Patterns - The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.

SC.912.E.7.1. Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.2. Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and deep water motion within the oceans and their impacts on the transfer of energy between the poles and the equator.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.3. Differentiate and describe the various interactions among Earth systems, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.4. Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate of a geographic area, including the relationships to lakes and oceans.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.5. Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.6. Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
SC.912.E.7.7. Identify, analyze, and relate the internal (Earth system) and external (astronomical) conditions that contribute to global climate change.
SC.912.E.7.9. Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and moving heat, carbon, and water.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

FL.SC.912.P. Physical Science

SC.912.P.10. Energy - A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc 2 . B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion. C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy. D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields. E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

SC.912.P.10.1. Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
SC.912.P.10.6. Create and interpret potential energy diagrams, for example: chemical reactions, orbits around a central body, motion of a pendulum.
SC.912.P.10.10. Compare the magnitude and range of the four fundamental forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, strong nuclear).
SC.912.P.10.13. Relate the configuration of static charges to the electric field, electric force, electric potential, and electric potential energy.
SC.912.P.10.14. Differentiate among conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.15. Investigate and explain the relationships among current, voltage, resistance, and power.
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
SC.912.P.10.18. Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy, and relate them to phenomena and applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.19. Explain that all objects emit and absorb electromagnetic radiation and distinguish between objects that are blackbody radiators and those that are not.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.10.20. Describe the measurable properties of waves and explain the relationships among them and how these properties change when the wave moves from one medium to another.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

SC.912.P.12. Motion - A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. When objects travel at speeds comparable to the speed of light, Einstein's special theory of relativity applies. B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval. C. The Law of Universal Gravitation states that gravitational forces act on all objects irrespective of their size and position. D. Gases consist of great numbers of molecules moving in all directions. The behavior of gases can be modeled by the kinetic molecular theory. E. Chemical reaction rates change with conditions under which they occur. Chemical equilibrium is a dynamic state in which forward and reverse processes occur at the same rates.

SC.912.P.12.1. Distinguish between scalar and vector quantities and assess which should be used to describe an event.
SC.912.P.12.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.3. Interpret and apply Newton's three laws of motion.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
SC.912.P.12.13. Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium in terms of reversible processes occurring at the same rates.

FL.SC.912.L. Life Science

SC.912.L.15. Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms - A. The scientific theory of evolution is the fundamental concept underlying all of biology. B. The scientific theory of evolution is supported by multiple forms of scientific evidence. C. Organisms are classified based on their evolutionary history. D. Natural selection is a primary mechanism leading to evolutionary change.

SC.912.L.15.1. Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3

SC.912.L.17. Interdependence - A. The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between organisms, and between organisms and the non-living environment. B. Energy and nutrients move within and between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems via physical, chemical and biological processes. C. Human activities and natural events can have profound effects on populations, biodiversity and ecosystem processes.

SC.912.L.17.2. Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.3. Discuss how various oceanic and freshwater processes, such as currents, tides, and waves, affect the abundance of aquatic organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
SC.912.L.17.7. Characterize the biotic and abiotic components that define freshwater systems, marine systems and terrestrial systems.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
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