Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for High School Earth Science

Earth`s ClimateWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Earth's SurfaceWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Minerals IIWorksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 2
Our Solar SystemWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3

§112.39. Physics (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. These investigations must involve actively obtaining and analyzing data with physical equipment but may also involve experimentation in a simulated environment as well as field observations that extend beyond the classroom. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses a systematic approach to answer scientific laboratory and field investigative questions. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course apparatus, equipment, techniques, and procedures, including multimeters (current, voltage, resistance), balances, batteries, dynamics demonstration equipment, collision apparatus, lab masses, magnets, plane mirrors, convex lenses, stopwatches, trajectory apparatus, graph paper, magnetic compasses, protractors, metric rulers, spring scales, thermometers, slinky springs, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatus, equipment, techniques, materials, and procedures as appropriate such as ripple tank with wave generator, wave motion rope, tuning forks, hand-held visual spectroscopes, discharge tubes with power supply (H, He, Ne, Ar), electromagnetic spectrum charts, laser pointers, micrometer, caliper, computer, data acquisition probes, scientific calculators, graphing technology, electrostatic kits, electroscope, inclined plane, optics bench, optics kit, polarized film, prisms, pulley with table clamp, motion detectors, photogates, friction blocks, ballistic carts or equivalent, resonance tube, stroboscope, resistors, copper wire, switches, iron filings, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(G). make measurements with accuracy and precision and record data using scientific notation and International System (SI) units
(J). express relationships among physical variables quantitatively, including the use of graphs, charts, and equations
(3). Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(E). express, manipulate, and interpret relationships symbolically in accordance with accepted theories to make predictions and solve problems mathematically
(4). Science concepts. The student knows and applies the laws governing motion in a variety of situations. The student is expected to:
(A). generate and interpret graphs and charts describing different types of motion, including investigations using real-time technology such as motion detectors or photogates
(B). describe and analyze motion in one dimension using equations and graphical vector addition with the concepts of distance, displacement, speed, average velocity, instantaneous velocity, frames of reference, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(C). analyze and describe accelerated motion in two dimensions, including using equations, graphical vector addition, and projectile and circular examples
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(D). calculate the effect of forces on objects, including the law of inertia, the relationship between force and acceleration, and the nature of force pairs between objects using methods, including free-body force diagrams
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
(5). Science concepts. The student knows the nature of forces in the physical world. The student is expected to:
(A). describe the concepts of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces
(E). characterize materials as conductors or insulators based on their electric properties
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(F). investigate and calculate current through, potential difference across, resistance of, and power used by electric circuit elements connected in both series and parallel combinations
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that changes occur within a physical system and applies the laws of conservation of energy and momentum. The student is expected to:
(A). investigate and calculate quantities using the work-energy theorem in various situations
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
(B). investigate examples of kinetic and potential energy and their transformations
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
HeatWorksheets :3
(C). calculate the mechanical energy of, power generated within, impulse applied to, and momentum of a physical system
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
(E). explain everyday examples that illustrate the four laws of thermodynamics and the processes of thermal energy transfer
HeatWorksheets :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and behavior of waves. The student is expected to:
(A). examine and describe oscillatory motion and wave propagation in various types of media
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
(B). investigate and analyze characteristics of waves, including velocity, frequency, amplitude, and wavelength, and calculate using the relationship between wavespeed, frequency, and wavelength
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(C). compare characteristics and behaviors of transverse waves, including electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum, and characteristics and behaviors of longitudinal waves, including sound waves
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SoundWorksheets :3
MagnetismWorksheets :3
(D). investigate behaviors of waves, including reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference, resonance, and the Doppler effect
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SoundWorksheets :3
(8). Science concepts. The student knows simple examples of atomic, nuclear, and quantum phenomena. The student is expected to:
(D). give examples of applications of atomic and nuclear phenomena using the standard model such as nuclear stability, fission and fusion, radiation therapy, diagnostic imaging, semiconductors, superconductors, solar cells, and nuclear power and examples of applications of quantum phenomena
Nuclear ChemistryWorksheets :3

§112.38. Integrated Physics and Chemistry (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student, for at least 40% of instructional time, conducts laboratory and field investigations using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations, including the appropriate use of safety showers, eyewash fountains, safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate, and fire extinguishers
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(C). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific practices during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(C). collect data and make measurements with accuracy and precision
(4). Science concepts. The student knows concepts of force and motion evident in everyday life. The student is expected to:
(A). describe and calculate an object's motion in terms of position, displacement, speed, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(B). measure and graph distance and speed as a function of time
(C). investigate how an object's motion changes only when a net force is applied, including activities and equipment such as toy cars, vehicle restraints, sports activities, and classroom objects
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(D). describe and calculate the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration using equipment such as dynamic carts, moving toys, vehicles, and falling objects
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(5). Science concepts. The student recognizes multiple forms of energy and knows the impact of energy transfer and energy conservation in everyday life. The student is expected to:
(A). recognize and demonstrate that objects and substances in motion have kinetic energy such as vibration of atoms, water flowing down a stream moving pebbles, and bowling balls knocking down pins
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
HeatWorksheets :3
(B). recognize and demonstrate common forms of potential energy, including gravitational, elastic, and chemical, such as a ball on an inclined plane, springs, and batteries
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
(F). evaluate the transfer of electrical energy in series and parallel circuits and conductive materials
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(G). explore the characteristics and behaviors of energy transferred by waves, including acoustic, seismic, light, and waves on water, as they reflect, refract, diffract, interfere with one another, and are absorbed by materials
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(H). analyze energy transformations of renewable and nonrenewable resources
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that relationships exist between the structure and properties of matter. The student is expected to:
(A). examine differences in physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases as explained by the arrangement and motion of atoms or molecules
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(B). relate chemical properties of substances to the arrangement of their atoms
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
(C). analyze physical and chemical properties of elements and compounds such as color, density, viscosity, buoyancy, boiling point, freezing point, conductivity, and reactivity
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
(D). relate the placement of an element on the Periodic Table to its physical and chemical behavior, including bonding and classification
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
(E). relate the structure of water to its function as a solvent
SolutionsWorksheets :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows that changes in matter affect everyday life. The student is expected to:
(A). investigate changes of state as it relates to the arrangement of particles of matter and energy transfer
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(B). recognize that chemical changes can occur when substances react to form different substances and that these interactions are largely determined by the valence electrons
(D). classify energy changes that accompany chemical reactions such as those occurring in heat packs, cold packs, and glow sticks as exothermic or endothermic reactions
(E). describe types of nuclear reactions such as fission and fusion and their roles in applications such as medicine and energy production
Nuclear ChemistryWorksheets :3

§112.34. Biology (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific practices and equipment during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(F). collect and organize qualitative and quantitative data and make measurements with accuracy and precision using tools such as data-collecting probes, standard laboratory glassware, microscopes, various prepared slides, stereoscopes, metric rulers, balances, gel electrophoresis apparatuses, micropipettes, hand lenses, Celsius thermometers, hot plates, lab notebooks or journals, timing devices, Petri dishes, lab incubators, dissection equipment, meter sticks, and models, diagrams, or samples of biological specimens or structures
The science of biologyThe processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
DNA technology/genetic engineeringThis topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(3). Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(F). research and describe the history of biology and contributions of scientists
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Genetics and heredity IHow many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
(4). Science concepts. The student knows that cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions and that viruses are different from cells. The student is expected to:
(B). investigate and explain cellular processes, including homeostasis and transport of molecules
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
(C). compare the structures of viruses to cells, describe viral reproduction, and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza
Microorganisms IHyphae - threadlike filaments of branching cells that make up the bodies of multicellular fungi. Gymnosperm - group of vascular plants that develop seeds without a protective outer covering; they do not produce flowers or fruit. Flagellum - a tail-like structure found on bacteria and select protists which helps them to move. Volvox - a freshwater, chlorophyll-containing green alga, that occurs in ball-shaped colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :5
(5). Science concepts. The student knows how an organism grows and the importance of cell differentiation. The student is expected to:
(A). describe the stages of the cell cycle, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and mitosis, and the importance of the cell cycle to the growth of organisms
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
MitosisStructures and functions of living organisms: Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organ Systems. Differentiate between the processes of mitosis and meiosis. Describe different cell parts and their functions. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
(B). describe the roles of DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA), and environmental factors in cell differentiation
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the mechanisms of genetics such as the role of nucleic acids and the principles of Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics. The student is expected to:
(A). identify components of DNA, identify how information for specifying the traits of an organism is carried in the DNA, and examine scientific explanations for the origin of DNA
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Study of HeredityHeredity refers to the genetic heritage passed down by our biological parents when certain traits are passed from the parents to the children. Traits are characteristics such as height, hair color etc... Heredity is passed through genes in the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. DNA is a molecule that contains the biological instructions that make each species unique. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
(B). recognize that components that make up the genetic code are common to all organisms
The Study of HeredityHeredity refers to the genetic heritage passed down by our biological parents when certain traits are passed from the parents to the children. Traits are characteristics such as height, hair color etc... Heredity is passed through genes in the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. DNA is a molecule that contains the biological instructions that make each species unique. Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
(C). explain the purpose and process of transcription and translation using models of DNA and RNA
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). identify and illustrate changes in DNA and evaluate the significance of these changes
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
DNA technology/genetic engineeringThis topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(F). predict possible outcomes of various genetic combinations such as monohybrid crosses, dihybrid crosses, and non-Mendelian inheritance
MeiosisMeiosis is a process where a single cell divides twice to produce four cells containing half the original amount of genetic information. These cells are our sex cells – sperm in males, eggs in females. Prophase I - a phase of meiosis during which chromosomes thicken and homologous pairs of chromosomes move together. Metaphase I - a phase of meiosis I during which homologous pairs of chromosomes line up in the center of the cell. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(G). recognize the significance of meiosis to sexual reproduction
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
MeiosisMeiosis is a process where a single cell divides twice to produce four cells containing half the original amount of genetic information. These cells are our sex cells – sperm in males, eggs in females. Prophase I - a phase of meiosis during which chromosomes thicken and homologous pairs of chromosomes move together. Metaphase I - a phase of meiosis I during which homologous pairs of chromosomes line up in the center of the cell. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. The student is expected to:
(C). analyze and evaluate how natural selection produces change in populations, not individuals
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(D). analyze and evaluate how the elements of natural selection, including inherited variation, the potential of a population to produce more offspring than can survive, and a finite supply of environmental resources, result in differential reproductive success
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(E). analyze and evaluate the relationship of natural selection to adaptation and to the development of diversity in and among species
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that taxonomy is a branching classification based on the shared characteristics of organisms and can change as new discoveries are made. The student is expected to:
(A). define taxonomy and recognize the importance of a standardized taxonomic system to the scientific community
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(B). categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups
Introduction to plantsWhich woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Microorganisms IITaxonomy is the classification of all known living organisms that shows relationships between different organisms. Pseudopod is false feet; temporary fingerlike projections a one-celled organism, such as an amoeba, uses to move. Protozoa - single-celled, animal-like protist that has the ability to move. Mycelium - a mass of fungal hyphae that absorbs nutrients. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). compare characteristics of taxonomic groups, including archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals
Introduction to plantsWhich woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Microorganisms IITaxonomy is the classification of all known living organisms that shows relationships between different organisms. Pseudopod is false feet; temporary fingerlike projections a one-celled organism, such as an amoeba, uses to move. Protozoa - single-celled, animal-like protist that has the ability to move. Mycelium - a mass of fungal hyphae that absorbs nutrients. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(10). Science concepts. The student knows that biological systems are composed of multiple levels. The student is expected to:
(B). describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of transport, reproduction, and response in plants
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
(C). analyze the levels of organization in biological systems and relate the levels to each other and to the whole system
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
(11). Science concepts. The student knows that biological systems work to achieve and maintain balance. The student is expected to:
(A). summarize the role of microorganisms in both maintaining and disrupting the health of both organisms and ecosystems
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Microorganisms IHyphae - threadlike filaments of branching cells that make up the bodies of multicellular fungi. Gymnosperm - group of vascular plants that develop seeds without a protective outer covering; they do not produce flowers or fruit. Flagellum - a tail-like structure found on bacteria and select protists which helps them to move. Volvox - a freshwater, chlorophyll-containing green alga, that occurs in ball-shaped colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :5
(12). Science concepts. The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(B). compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). analyze the flow of matter and energy through trophic levels using various models, including food chains, food webs, and ecological pyramids
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
(D). describe the flow of matter through the carbon and nitrogen cycles and explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

§112.39. Physics (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. These investigations must involve actively obtaining and analyzing data with physical equipment but may also involve experimentation in a simulated environment as well as field observations that extend beyond the classroom. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses a systematic approach to answer scientific laboratory and field investigative questions. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course apparatus, equipment, techniques, and procedures, including multimeters (current, voltage, resistance), balances, batteries, dynamics demonstration equipment, collision apparatus, lab masses, magnets, plane mirrors, convex lenses, stopwatches, trajectory apparatus, graph paper, magnetic compasses, protractors, metric rulers, spring scales, thermometers, slinky springs, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatus, equipment, techniques, materials, and procedures as appropriate such as ripple tank with wave generator, wave motion rope, tuning forks, hand-held visual spectroscopes, discharge tubes with power supply (H, He, Ne, Ar), electromagnetic spectrum charts, laser pointers, micrometer, caliper, computer, data acquisition probes, scientific calculators, graphing technology, electrostatic kits, electroscope, inclined plane, optics bench, optics kit, polarized film, prisms, pulley with table clamp, motion detectors, photogates, friction blocks, ballistic carts or equivalent, resonance tube, stroboscope, resistors, copper wire, switches, iron filings, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(G). make measurements with accuracy and precision and record data using scientific notation and International System (SI) units
(J). express relationships among physical variables quantitatively, including the use of graphs, charts, and equations
(3). Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(E). express, manipulate, and interpret relationships symbolically in accordance with accepted theories to make predictions and solve problems mathematically
(4). Science concepts. The student knows and applies the laws governing motion in a variety of situations. The student is expected to:
(A). generate and interpret graphs and charts describing different types of motion, including investigations using real-time technology such as motion detectors or photogates
(B). describe and analyze motion in one dimension using equations and graphical vector addition with the concepts of distance, displacement, speed, average velocity, instantaneous velocity, frames of reference, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(C). analyze and describe accelerated motion in two dimensions, including using equations, graphical vector addition, and projectile and circular examples
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(D). calculate the effect of forces on objects, including the law of inertia, the relationship between force and acceleration, and the nature of force pairs between objects using methods, including free-body force diagrams
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(5). Science concepts. The student knows the nature of forces in the physical world. The student is expected to:
(A). describe the concepts of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces
(E). characterize materials as conductors or insulators based on their electric properties
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(F). investigate and calculate current through, potential difference across, resistance of, and power used by electric circuit elements connected in both series and parallel combinations
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that changes occur within a physical system and applies the laws of conservation of energy and momentum. The student is expected to:
(B). investigate examples of kinetic and potential energy and their transformations
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and behavior of waves. The student is expected to:
(A). examine and describe oscillatory motion and wave propagation in various types of media
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(B). investigate and analyze characteristics of waves, including velocity, frequency, amplitude, and wavelength, and calculate using the relationship between wavespeed, frequency, and wavelength
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(C). compare characteristics and behaviors of transverse waves, including electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum, and characteristics and behaviors of longitudinal waves, including sound waves
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(D). investigate behaviors of waves, including reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference, resonance, and the Doppler effect
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

§112.38. Integrated Physics and Chemistry (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student, for at least 40% of instructional time, conducts laboratory and field investigations using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations, including the appropriate use of safety showers, eyewash fountains, safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate, and fire extinguishers
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(C). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific practices during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(C). collect data and make measurements with accuracy and precision
(4). Science concepts. The student knows concepts of force and motion evident in everyday life. The student is expected to:
(A). describe and calculate an object's motion in terms of position, displacement, speed, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(B). measure and graph distance and speed as a function of time
(C). investigate how an object's motion changes only when a net force is applied, including activities and equipment such as toy cars, vehicle restraints, sports activities, and classroom objects
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(D). describe and calculate the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration using equipment such as dynamic carts, moving toys, vehicles, and falling objects
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(5). Science concepts. The student recognizes multiple forms of energy and knows the impact of energy transfer and energy conservation in everyday life. The student is expected to:
(A). recognize and demonstrate that objects and substances in motion have kinetic energy such as vibration of atoms, water flowing down a stream moving pebbles, and bowling balls knocking down pins
(B). recognize and demonstrate common forms of potential energy, including gravitational, elastic, and chemical, such as a ball on an inclined plane, springs, and batteries
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(F). evaluate the transfer of electrical energy in series and parallel circuits and conductive materials
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(G). explore the characteristics and behaviors of energy transferred by waves, including acoustic, seismic, light, and waves on water, as they reflect, refract, diffract, interfere with one another, and are absorbed by materials
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that relationships exist between the structure and properties of matter. The student is expected to:
(B). relate chemical properties of substances to the arrangement of their atoms
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
(C). analyze physical and chemical properties of elements and compounds such as color, density, viscosity, buoyancy, boiling point, freezing point, conductivity, and reactivity
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
(D). relate the placement of an element on the Periodic Table to its physical and chemical behavior, including bonding and classification
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3

§112.34. Biology (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(8). Science concepts. The student knows that taxonomy is a branching classification based on the shared characteristics of organisms and can change as new discoveries are made. The student is expected to:
(B). categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(C). compare characteristics of taxonomic groups, including archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(11). Science concepts. The student knows that biological systems work to achieve and maintain balance. The student is expected to:
(A). summarize the role of microorganisms in both maintaining and disrupting the health of both organisms and ecosystems
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
(12). Science concepts. The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(A). interpret relationships, including predation, parasitism, commensalism, mutualism, and competition, among organisms
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(B). compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). analyze the flow of matter and energy through trophic levels using various models, including food chains, food webs, and ecological pyramids
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
(D). describe the flow of matter through the carbon and nitrogen cycles and explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

§112.32. Aquatic Science, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. Students know that aquatic environments are the product of Earth systems interactions. The student is expected to:
(A). identify key features and characteristics of atmospheric, geological, hydrological, and biological systems as they relate to aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). apply systems thinking to the examination of aquatic environments, including positive and negative feedback cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). collect and evaluate global environmental data using technology such as maps, visualizations, satellite data, Global Positioning System (GPS)., Geographic Information System (GIS)., weather balloons, buoys, etc.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the role of cycles in an aquatic environment. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the role of carbon, nitrogen, water, and nutrient cycles in an aquatic environment, including upwellings and turnovers
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). examine the interrelationships between aquatic systems and climate and weather, including El Niño and La Niña, currents, and hurricanes
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the origin and use of water in a watershed. The student is expected to:
(A). identify sources and determine the amounts of water in a watershed, including rainfall, groundwater, and surface water
(B). identify factors that contribute to how water flows through a watershed
(C). identify water quantity and quality in a local watershed
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that geological phenomena and fluid dynamics affect aquatic systems. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate basic principles of fluid dynamics, including hydrostatic pressure, density, salinity, and buoyancy
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). identify interrelationships between ocean currents, climates, and geologic features
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student knows the types and components of aquatic ecosystems. The student is expected to:
(A). differentiate among freshwater, brackish, and saltwater ecosystems
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). identify the major properties and components of different marine and freshwater life zones
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). identify biological, chemical, geological, and physical components of an aquatic life zone as they relate to the organisms in it
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(11). Science concepts. The student knows about the interdependence and interactions that occur in aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). identify how energy flows and matter cycles through both fresh water and salt water aquatic systems, including food webs, chains, and pyramids
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). evaluate the factors affecting aquatic population cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(12). Science concepts. The student understands how human activities impact aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). predict effects of chemical, organic, physical, and thermal changes from humans on the living and nonliving components of an aquatic ecosystem
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). analyze the cumulative impact of human population growth on an aquatic system
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). analyze and discuss how human activities such as fishing, transportation, dams, and recreation influence aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.35. Chemistry (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific practices to solve investigative questions. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(F). collect data and make measurements with accuracy and precision
(G). express and manipulate chemical quantities using scientific conventions and mathematical procedures, including dimensional analysis, scientific notation, and significant figures
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(4). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics of matter and can analyze the relationships between chemical and physical changes and properties. The student is expected to:
(A). differentiate between physical and chemical changes and properties
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
(B). identify extensive properties such as mass and volume and intensive properties such as density and melting point
MechanicsWorksheets :3
(C). compare solids, liquids, and gases in terms of compressibility, structure, shape, and volume
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(D). classify matter as pure substances or mixtures through investigation of their properties
(5). Science concepts. The student understands the historical development of the Periodic Table and can apply its predictive power. The student is expected to:
(B). identify and explain the properties of chemical families, including alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, noble gases, and transition metals, using the Periodic Table
(C). interpret periodic trends, including atomic radius, electronegativity, and ionization energy, using the Periodic Table
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows and understands the historical development of atomic theory. The student is expected to:
(B). describe the mathematical relationships between energy, frequency, and wavelength of light using the electromagnetic spectrum
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(D). express the arrangement of electrons in atoms of representative elements using electron configurations and Lewis valence electron dot structures
(7). Science concepts. The student knows how atoms form ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds. The student is expected to:
(A). name ionic compounds containing main group or transition metals, covalent compounds, acids, and bases using International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) nomenclature rules
(B). write the chemical formulas of ionic compounds containing representative elements, transition metals and common polyatomic ions, covalent compounds, and acids and bases
(8). Science concepts. The student can quantify the changes that occur during chemical reactions. The student is expected to:
(A). define and use the concept of a mole
The MoleWorksheets :3
(D). differentiate between empirical and molecular formulas
(E). write and balance chemical equations using the law of conservation of mass
(F). differentiate among double replacement reactions, including acid-base reactions and precipitation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions such as synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, and combustion reactions
Chemical ReactionsChemical reaction is a process in which one or more substances, are converted to one or more different products. Synthesis - a chemical reaction where two or more elements or compounds combine to form a single product. Single Replacement Reaction - a chemical reaction where a more active element replaces a less active element in a compound. Decomposition - a chemical reaction in which a compound is broken down into simpler compounds or elements. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student understands the principles of ideal gas behavior, kinetic molecular theory, and the conditions that influence the behavior of gases. The student is expected to:
(A). describe and calculate the relations between volume, pressure, number of moles, and temperature for an ideal gas as described by Boyle's law, Charles' law, Avogadro's law, Dalton's law of partial pressure, and the ideal gas law
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(B). describe the postulates of kinetic molecular theory
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(10). Science concepts. The student understands and can apply the factors that influence the behavior of solutions. The student is expected to:
(G). define acids and bases and distinguish between Arrhenius and Bronsted-Lowry definitions and predict products in acid-base reactions that form water
Acids, Bases and SaltsFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1
(11). Science concepts. The student understands the energy changes that occur in chemical reactions. The student is expected to:
(A). describe energy and its forms, including kinetic, potential, chemical, and thermal energies
GasesWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
(B). describe the law of conservation of energy and the processes of heat transfer in terms of calorimetry
HeatWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(C). classify reactions as exothermic or endothermic and represent energy changes that occur in chemical reactions using thermochemical equations or graphical analysis
HeatWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(D). perform calculations involving heat, mass, temperature change, and specific heat
HeatWorksheets :3

§112.39. Physics (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. These investigations must involve actively obtaining and analyzing data with physical equipment but may also involve experimentation in a simulated environment as well as field observations that extend beyond the classroom. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses a systematic approach to answer scientific laboratory and field investigative questions. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course apparatus, equipment, techniques, and procedures, including multimeters (current, voltage, resistance), balances, batteries, dynamics demonstration equipment, collision apparatus, lab masses, magnets, plane mirrors, convex lenses, stopwatches, trajectory apparatus, graph paper, magnetic compasses, protractors, metric rulers, spring scales, thermometers, slinky springs, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatus, equipment, techniques, materials, and procedures as appropriate such as ripple tank with wave generator, wave motion rope, tuning forks, hand-held visual spectroscopes, discharge tubes with power supply (H, He, Ne, Ar), electromagnetic spectrum charts, laser pointers, micrometer, caliper, computer, data acquisition probes, scientific calculators, graphing technology, electrostatic kits, electroscope, inclined plane, optics bench, optics kit, polarized film, prisms, pulley with table clamp, motion detectors, photogates, friction blocks, ballistic carts or equivalent, resonance tube, stroboscope, resistors, copper wire, switches, iron filings, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(G). make measurements with accuracy and precision and record data using scientific notation and International System (SI) units
(J). express relationships among physical variables quantitatively, including the use of graphs, charts, and equations
(3). Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(E). express, manipulate, and interpret relationships symbolically in accordance with accepted theories to make predictions and solve problems mathematically
(4). Science concepts. The student knows and applies the laws governing motion in a variety of situations. The student is expected to:
(A). generate and interpret graphs and charts describing different types of motion, including investigations using real-time technology such as motion detectors or photogates
(B). describe and analyze motion in one dimension using equations and graphical vector addition with the concepts of distance, displacement, speed, average velocity, instantaneous velocity, frames of reference, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(C). analyze and describe accelerated motion in two dimensions, including using equations, graphical vector addition, and projectile and circular examples
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(D). calculate the effect of forces on objects, including the law of inertia, the relationship between force and acceleration, and the nature of force pairs between objects using methods, including free-body force diagrams
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(5). Science concepts. The student knows the nature of forces in the physical world. The student is expected to:
(A). describe the concepts of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces
(E). characterize materials as conductors or insulators based on their electric properties
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(F). investigate and calculate current through, potential difference across, resistance of, and power used by electric circuit elements connected in both series and parallel combinations
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that changes occur within a physical system and applies the laws of conservation of energy and momentum. The student is expected to:
(B). investigate examples of kinetic and potential energy and their transformations
(E). explain everyday examples that illustrate the four laws of thermodynamics and the processes of thermal energy transfer
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and behavior of waves. The student is expected to:
(A). examine and describe oscillatory motion and wave propagation in various types of media
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(B). investigate and analyze characteristics of waves, including velocity, frequency, amplitude, and wavelength, and calculate using the relationship between wavespeed, frequency, and wavelength
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(C). compare characteristics and behaviors of transverse waves, including electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum, and characteristics and behaviors of longitudinal waves, including sound waves
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(D). investigate behaviors of waves, including reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference, resonance, and the Doppler effect
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

§112.34. Biology (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(12). Science concepts. The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(B). compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.32. Aquatic Science, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. Students know that aquatic environments are the product of Earth systems interactions. The student is expected to:
(A). identify key features and characteristics of atmospheric, geological, hydrological, and biological systems as they relate to aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). apply systems thinking to the examination of aquatic environments, including positive and negative feedback cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). collect and evaluate global environmental data using technology such as maps, visualizations, satellite data, Global Positioning System (GPS)., Geographic Information System (GIS)., weather balloons, buoys, etc.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the role of cycles in an aquatic environment. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the role of carbon, nitrogen, water, and nutrient cycles in an aquatic environment, including upwellings and turnovers
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). examine the interrelationships between aquatic systems and climate and weather, including El Niño and La Niña, currents, and hurricanes
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the origin and use of water in a watershed. The student is expected to:
(A). identify sources and determine the amounts of water in a watershed, including rainfall, groundwater, and surface water
(B). identify factors that contribute to how water flows through a watershed
(C). identify water quantity and quality in a local watershed
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that geological phenomena and fluid dynamics affect aquatic systems. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate basic principles of fluid dynamics, including hydrostatic pressure, density, salinity, and buoyancy
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). identify interrelationships between ocean currents, climates, and geologic features
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student knows the types and components of aquatic ecosystems. The student is expected to:
(A). differentiate among freshwater, brackish, and saltwater ecosystems
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). identify the major properties and components of different marine and freshwater life zones
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). identify biological, chemical, geological, and physical components of an aquatic life zone as they relate to the organisms in it
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(11). Science concepts. The student knows about the interdependence and interactions that occur in aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). identify how energy flows and matter cycles through both fresh water and salt water aquatic systems, including food webs, chains, and pyramids
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). evaluate the factors affecting aquatic population cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(12). Science concepts. The student understands how human activities impact aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). predict effects of chemical, organic, physical, and thermal changes from humans on the living and nonliving components of an aquatic ecosystem
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). analyze the cumulative impact of human population growth on an aquatic system
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). analyze and discuss how human activities such as fishing, transportation, dams, and recreation influence aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.35. Chemistry (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(6). Science concepts. The student knows and understands the historical development of atomic theory. The student is expected to:
(B). describe the mathematical relationships between energy, frequency, and wavelength of light using the electromagnetic spectrum
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

§112.33. Astronomy, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. The student recognizes the importance and uses of astronomy in civilization. The student is expected to:
(B). research and describe the contributions of scientists to our changing understanding of astronomy, including Ptolemy, Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and Hubble, and the contribution of women astronomers, including Maria Mitchell and Henrietta Swan Leavitt
(5). Science concepts. The student develops a familiarity with the sky. The student is expected to:
(B). observe and record the apparent movement of the Moon, planets, and stars in the nighttime sky
(6). Science concepts. The student knows our place in space. The student is expected to:
(A). compare and contrast the scale, size, and distance of the Sun, Earth, and Moon system through the use of data and modeling
(B). compare and contrast the scale, size, and distance of objects in the solar system such as the Sun and planets through the use of data and modeling
(C). examine the scale, size, and distance of the stars, Milky Way, and other galaxies through the use of data and modeling
(D). relate apparent versus absolute magnitude to the distances of celestial objects
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the role of the Moon in the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student is expected to:
(A). observe and record data about lunar phases and use that information to model the Sun, Earth, and Moon system
(B). illustrate the cause of lunar phases by showing positions of the Moon relative to Earth and the Sun for each phase, including new moon, waxing crescent, first quarter, waxing gibbous, full moon, waning gibbous, third quarter, and waning crescent
(C). identify and differentiate the causes of lunar and solar eclipses, including differentiating between lunar phases and eclipses
(9). Science concepts. The student knows that planets of different size, composition, and surface features orbit around the Sun. The student is expected to:
(B). compare the planets in terms of orbit, size, composition, rotation, atmosphere, natural satellites, and geological activity
(C). relate the role of Newton's law of universal gravitation to the motion of the planets around the Sun and to the motion of natural and artificial satellites around the planets
(D). explore the origins and significance of small solar system bodies, including asteroids, comets, and Kuiper belt objects
(10). Science concepts. The student knows the role of the Sun as the star in our solar system. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the approximate mass, size, motion, temperature, structure, and composition of the Sun
(B). distinguish between nuclear fusion and nuclear fission, and identify the source of energy within the Sun as nuclear fusion of hydrogen to helium
(C). describe the eleven-year solar cycle and the significance of sunspots
(11). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and life cycle of stars. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the characteristics of main sequence stars, including surface temperature, age, relative size, and composition
(B). characterize star formation in stellar nurseries from giant molecular clouds, to protostars, to the development of main sequence stars
(C). evaluate the relationship between mass and fusion on the dying process and properties of stars
(D). differentiate among the end states of stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes
(E). compare how the mass and gravity of a main sequence star will determine its end state as a white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole
(G). use the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to plot and examine the life cycle of stars from birth to death
(12). Science concepts. The student knows the variety and properties of galaxies. The student is expected to:
(A). describe characteristics of galaxies
(C). compare and contrast the different types of galaxies, including spiral, elliptical, irregular, and dwarf
(13). Science concepts. The student knows the scientific theories of cosmology. The student is expected to:
(A). research and describe the historical development of the Big Bang Theory, including red shift, cosmic microwave background radiation, and other supporting evidence
(C). research and describe scientific hypotheses of the fate of the universe, including open and closed universes and the role of dark matter and dark energy

§112.36. Earth and Space Science, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts laboratory and field investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course equipment, techniques, and procedures, including computers and web-based computer applications
Lab investigations/scientific methodA biologist reported success in breeding a tiger with a lion, producing healthy offspring. Other biologists will accept this report as fact only if other researchers can replicate the experiment. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatuses, equipment, techniques, and procedures as appropriate such as satellite imagery and other remote sensing data, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), scientific probes, microscopes, telescopes, modern video and image libraries, weather stations, fossil and rock kits, bar magnets, coiled springs, wave simulators, tectonic plate models, and planetary globes
Lab investigations/scientific methodA biologist reported success in breeding a tiger with a lion, producing healthy offspring. Other biologists will accept this report as fact only if other researchers can replicate the experiment. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(4). Earth in space and time. The student knows how Earth-based and space-based astronomical observations reveal differing theories about the structure, scale, composition, origin, and history of the universe. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate the evidence concerning the Big Bang model such as red shift and cosmic microwave background radiation and current theories of the evolution of the universe, including estimates for the age of the universe
(B). explain how the Sun and other stars transform matter into energy through nuclear fusion
(C). investigate the process by which a supernova can lead to the formation of successive generation stars and planets
(5). Earth in space and time. The student understands the solar nebular accretionary disk model. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze how gravitational condensation of solar nebular gas and dust can lead to the accretion of planetesimals and protoplanets
(B). investigate thermal energy sources, including kinetic heat of impact accretion, gravitational compression, and radioactive decay, which are thought to allow protoplanet differentiation into layers
(C). contrast the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteoroids and their positions in the solar system, including the orbital regions of the terrestrial planets, the asteroid belt, gas giants, Kuiper Belt, and Oort Cloud
(D). explore the historical and current hypotheses for the origin of the Moon, including the collision of Earth with a Mars-sized planetesimal
(E). compare terrestrial planets to gas-giant planets in the solar system, including structure, composition, size, density, orbit, surface features, tectonic activity, temperature, and suitability for life
(6). Earth in space and time. The student knows the evidence for how Earth's atmospheres, hydrosphere, and geosphere formed and changed through time. The student is expected to:
(D). evaluate the evidence that Earth's cooling led to tectonic activity, resulting in continents and ocean basins
(7). Earth in space and time. The student knows that scientific dating methods of fossils and rock sequences are used to construct a chronology of Earth's history expressed in the geologic time scale. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate relative dating methods using original horizontality, rock superposition, lateral continuity, cross-cutting relationships, unconformities, index fossils, and biozones based on fossil succession to determine chronological order
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(B). calculate the ages of igneous rocks from Earth and the Moon and meteorites using radiometric dating methods
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(C). understand how multiple dating methods are used to construct the geologic time scale, which represents Earth's approximate 4.6-billion-year history
(8). Earth in space and time. The student knows that fossils provide evidence for geological and biological evolution. Students are expected to:
(A). analyze and evaluate a variety of fossil types such as transitional fossils, proposed transitional fossils, fossil lineages, and significant fossil deposits with regard to their appearance, completeness, and alignment with scientific explanations in light of this fossil data
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(B). explain how sedimentation, fossilization, and speciation affect the degree of completeness of the fossil record
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(9). Solid Earth. The student knows Earth's interior is differentiated chemically, physically, and thermally. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate heat transfer through Earth's subsystems by radiation, convection, and conduction and include its role in plate tectonics, volcanism, ocean circulation, weather, and climate
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). examine the chemical, physical, and thermal structure of Earth's crust, mantle, and core, including the lithosphere and asthenosphere
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(C). explain how scientists use geophysical methods such as seismic wave analysis, gravity, and magnetism to interpret Earth's structure
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(10). Solid Earth. The student knows that plate tectonics is the global mechanism for major geologic processes and that heat transfer, governed by the principles of thermodynamics, is the driving force. The student is expected to:
(A). investigate how new conceptual interpretations of data and innovative geophysical technologies led to the current theory of plate tectonics
(B). describe how heat and rock composition affect density within Earth's interior and how density influences the development and motion of Earth's tectonic plates
(C). explain how plate tectonics accounts for geologic processes and features, including sea floor spreading, ocean ridges and rift valleys, subduction zones, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain ranges, hot spots, and hydrothermal vents
(D). calculate the motion history of tectonic plates using equations relating rate, time, and distance to predict future motions, locations, and resulting geologic features
(E). distinguish the location, type, and relative motion of convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries using evidence from the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes
(F). evaluate the role of plate tectonics with respect to long-term global changes in Earth's subsystems such as continental buildup, glaciation, sea level fluctuations, mass extinctions, and climate change
(11). Solid Earth. The student knows that the geosphere continuously changes over a range of time scales involving dynamic and complex interactions among Earth's subsystems. The student is expected to:
(A). compare the roles of erosion and deposition through the actions of water, wind, ice, gravity, and igneous activity by lava in constantly reshaping Earth's surface
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). explain how plate tectonics accounts for geologic surface processes and features, including folds, faults, sedimentary basin formation, mountain building, and continental accretion
(C). analyze changes in continental plate configurations such as Pangaea and their impact on the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere through time
(D). interpret Earth surface features using a variety of methods such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, and topographic and geologic maps using appropriate technologies
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). evaluate the impact of changes in Earth's subsystems on humans such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, flooding, and storm surges and the impact of humans on Earth's subsystems such as population growth, fossil fuel burning, and use of fresh water
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(12). Solid Earth. The student knows that Earth contains energy, water, mineral, and rock resources and that use of these resources impacts Earth's subsystems. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate how the use of energy, water, mineral, and rock resources affects Earth's subsystems
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(13). Fluid Earth. The student knows that the fluid Earth is composed of the hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere subsystems that interact on various time scales with the biosphere and geosphere. The student is expected to:
(A). quantify the components and fluxes within the hydrosphere such as changes in polar ice caps and glaciers, salt water incursions, and groundwater levels in response to precipitation events or excessive pumping
(B). analyze how global ocean circulation is the result of wind, tides, the Coriolis effect, water density differences, and the shape of the ocean basins
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). analyze the empirical relationship between the emissions of carbon dioxide, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and the average global temperature trends over the past 150 years
(D). discuss mechanisms and causes such as selective absorbers, major volcanic eruptions, solar luminance, giant meteorite impacts, and human activities that result in significant changes in Earth's climate
(14). Fluid Earth. The student knows that Earth's global ocean stores solar energy and is a major driving force for weather and climate through complex atmospheric interactions. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze the uneven distribution of solar energy on Earth's surface, including differences in atmospheric transparency, surface albedo, Earth's tilt, duration of insolation, and differences in atmospheric and surface absorption of energy
(B). investigate how the atmosphere is heated from Earth's surface due to absorption of solar energy, which is re-radiated as thermal energy and trapped by selective absorbers
(C). explain how thermal energy transfer between the ocean and atmosphere drives surface currents, thermohaline currents, and evaporation that influence climate
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(15). Fluid Earth. The student knows that interactions among Earth's five subsystems influence climate and resource availability, which affect Earth's habitability. The student is expected to:
(A). describe how changing surface-ocean conditions, including El Niño-Southern Oscillation, affect global weather and climate patterns
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). quantify the dynamics of surface and groundwater movement such as recharge, discharge, evapotranspiration, storage, residence time, and sustainability
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). explain the global carbon cycle, including how carbon exists in different forms within the five subsystems and how these forms affect life
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
(E). analyze recent global ocean temperature data to predict the consequences of changing ocean temperature on evaporation, sea level, algal growth, coral bleaching, hurricane intensity, and biodiversity

§112.37. Environmental Systems, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. The student knows the relationships of biotic and abiotic factors within habitats, ecosystems, and biomes. The student is expected to:
(A). identify native plants and animals using a dichotomous key
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
(B). assess the role of native plants and animals within a local ecosystem and compare them to plants and animals in ecosystems within four other biomes
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
(C). diagram abiotic cycles, including the rock, hydrologic, carbon, and nitrogen cycles
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). make observations and compile data about fluctuations in abiotic cycles and evaluate the effects of abiotic factors on local ecosystems and local biomes
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). measure the concentration of solute, solvent, and solubility of dissolved substances such as dissolved oxygen, chlorides, and nitrates and describe their impact on an ecosystem
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(H). research and explain the causes of species diversity and predict changes that may occur in an ecosystem if species and genetic diversity is increased or reduced
Vertebrates IIA vertebrate is an animal with a spinal cord surrounded by cartilage or bone. The vertebrates are also characterized by a muscular system consisting primarily of bilaterally paired masses and a central nervous system partly enclosed within the backbone. The 7 classes of vertebrates are: Class Aves, Class Reptilia, Class Agnatha, Class Amphibia, Class Mammalia, Class Osteichthyes, Class Chondrichthyes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the sources and flow of energy through an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(A). define and identify the components of the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere and the interactions among them
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(D). investigate and explain the effects of energy transformations in terms of the laws of thermodynamics within an ecosystem
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
(E). investigate and identify energy interactions in an ecosystem
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that environments change naturally. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze and describe the effects on areas impacted by natural events such as tectonic movement, volcanic events, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, flooding, tsunamis, and population growth
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). explain how regional changes in the environment may have a global effect
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student knows the impact of human activities on the environment. The student is expected to:
(A). identify causes of air, soil, and water pollution, including point and nonpoint sources
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). investigate the types of air, soil, and water pollution such as chlorofluorocarbons, carbon dioxide, pH, pesticide runoff, thermal variations, metallic ions, heavy metals, and nuclear waste
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(C). examine the concentrations of air, soil, and water pollutants using appropriate units
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(E). evaluate the effect of human activities, including habitat restoration projects, species preservation efforts, nature conservancy groups, hunting, fishing, ecotourism, all terrain vehicles, and small personal watercraft, on the environment
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(F). evaluate cost-benefit trade-offs of commercial activities such as municipal development, farming, deforestation, over-harvesting, and mining
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.39. Physics (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. These investigations must involve actively obtaining and analyzing data with physical equipment but may also involve experimentation in a simulated environment as well as field observations that extend beyond the classroom. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses a systematic approach to answer scientific laboratory and field investigative questions. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course apparatus, equipment, techniques, and procedures, including multimeters (current, voltage, resistance), balances, batteries, dynamics demonstration equipment, collision apparatus, lab masses, magnets, plane mirrors, convex lenses, stopwatches, trajectory apparatus, graph paper, magnetic compasses, protractors, metric rulers, spring scales, thermometers, slinky springs, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatus, equipment, techniques, materials, and procedures as appropriate such as ripple tank with wave generator, wave motion rope, tuning forks, hand-held visual spectroscopes, discharge tubes with power supply (H, He, Ne, Ar), electromagnetic spectrum charts, laser pointers, micrometer, caliper, computer, data acquisition probes, scientific calculators, graphing technology, electrostatic kits, electroscope, inclined plane, optics bench, optics kit, polarized film, prisms, pulley with table clamp, motion detectors, photogates, friction blocks, ballistic carts or equivalent, resonance tube, stroboscope, resistors, copper wire, switches, iron filings, and/or other equipment and materials that will produce the same results
(G). make measurements with accuracy and precision and record data using scientific notation and International System (SI) units
(J). express relationships among physical variables quantitatively, including the use of graphs, charts, and equations
(3). Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(E). express, manipulate, and interpret relationships symbolically in accordance with accepted theories to make predictions and solve problems mathematically
(4). Science concepts. The student knows and applies the laws governing motion in a variety of situations. The student is expected to:
(A). generate and interpret graphs and charts describing different types of motion, including investigations using real-time technology such as motion detectors or photogates
(B). describe and analyze motion in one dimension using equations and graphical vector addition with the concepts of distance, displacement, speed, average velocity, instantaneous velocity, frames of reference, and acceleration
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(C). analyze and describe accelerated motion in two dimensions, including using equations, graphical vector addition, and projectile and circular examples
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(D). calculate the effect of forces on objects, including the law of inertia, the relationship between force and acceleration, and the nature of force pairs between objects using methods, including free-body force diagrams
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(5). Science concepts. The student knows the nature of forces in the physical world. The student is expected to:
(A). describe the concepts of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces
(E). characterize materials as conductors or insulators based on their electric properties
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(F). investigate and calculate current through, potential difference across, resistance of, and power used by electric circuit elements connected in both series and parallel combinations
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4
Modern ElectronicsWorksheets :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows that changes occur within a physical system and applies the laws of conservation of energy and momentum. The student is expected to:
(B). investigate examples of kinetic and potential energy and their transformations
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and behavior of waves. The student is expected to:
(A). examine and describe oscillatory motion and wave propagation in various types of media
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
(B). investigate and analyze characteristics of waves, including velocity, frequency, amplitude, and wavelength, and calculate using the relationship between wavespeed, frequency, and wavelength
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(C). compare characteristics and behaviors of transverse waves, including electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum, and characteristics and behaviors of longitudinal waves, including sound waves
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
(D). investigate behaviors of waves, including reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference, resonance, and the Doppler effect
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

§112.34. Biology (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(12). Science concepts. The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(B). compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.32. Aquatic Science, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. Students know that aquatic environments are the product of Earth systems interactions. The student is expected to:
(A). identify key features and characteristics of atmospheric, geological, hydrological, and biological systems as they relate to aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). apply systems thinking to the examination of aquatic environments, including positive and negative feedback cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). collect and evaluate global environmental data using technology such as maps, visualizations, satellite data, Global Positioning System (GPS)., Geographic Information System (GIS)., weather balloons, buoys, etc.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the role of cycles in an aquatic environment. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the role of carbon, nitrogen, water, and nutrient cycles in an aquatic environment, including upwellings and turnovers
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). examine the interrelationships between aquatic systems and climate and weather, including El Niño and La Niña, currents, and hurricanes
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the origin and use of water in a watershed. The student is expected to:
(A). identify sources and determine the amounts of water in a watershed, including rainfall, groundwater, and surface water
(B). identify factors that contribute to how water flows through a watershed
(C). identify water quantity and quality in a local watershed
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that geological phenomena and fluid dynamics affect aquatic systems. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate basic principles of fluid dynamics, including hydrostatic pressure, density, salinity, and buoyancy
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). identify interrelationships between ocean currents, climates, and geologic features
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student knows the types and components of aquatic ecosystems. The student is expected to:
(A). differentiate among freshwater, brackish, and saltwater ecosystems
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). identify the major properties and components of different marine and freshwater life zones
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). identify biological, chemical, geological, and physical components of an aquatic life zone as they relate to the organisms in it
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(11). Science concepts. The student knows about the interdependence and interactions that occur in aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). identify how energy flows and matter cycles through both fresh water and salt water aquatic systems, including food webs, chains, and pyramids
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). evaluate the factors affecting aquatic population cycles
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(12). Science concepts. The student understands how human activities impact aquatic environments. The student is expected to:
(A). predict effects of chemical, organic, physical, and thermal changes from humans on the living and nonliving components of an aquatic ecosystem
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). analyze the cumulative impact of human population growth on an aquatic system
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). analyze and discuss how human activities such as fishing, transportation, dams, and recreation influence aquatic environments
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

§112.35. Chemistry (One Credit), Adopted 2017 – The provisions of §§112.34, 112.35, 112.38, and 112.39 of this subchapter adopted in 2017 shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(6). Science concepts. The student knows and understands the historical development of atomic theory. The student is expected to:
(B). describe the mathematical relationships between energy, frequency, and wavelength of light using the electromagnetic spectrum
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

§112.33. Astronomy, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. The student recognizes the importance and uses of astronomy in civilization. The student is expected to:
(B). research and describe the contributions of scientists to our changing understanding of astronomy, including Ptolemy, Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and Hubble, and the contribution of women astronomers, including Maria Mitchell and Henrietta Swan Leavitt
(5). Science concepts. The student develops a familiarity with the sky. The student is expected to:
(B). observe and record the apparent movement of the Moon, planets, and stars in the nighttime sky
(6). Science concepts. The student knows our place in space. The student is expected to:
(A). compare and contrast the scale, size, and distance of the Sun, Earth, and Moon system through the use of data and modeling
(B). compare and contrast the scale, size, and distance of objects in the solar system such as the Sun and planets through the use of data and modeling
(C). examine the scale, size, and distance of the stars, Milky Way, and other galaxies through the use of data and modeling
(D). relate apparent versus absolute magnitude to the distances of celestial objects
(7). Science concepts. The student knows the role of the Moon in the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student is expected to:
(A). observe and record data about lunar phases and use that information to model the Sun, Earth, and Moon system
(B). illustrate the cause of lunar phases by showing positions of the Moon relative to Earth and the Sun for each phase, including new moon, waxing crescent, first quarter, waxing gibbous, full moon, waning gibbous, third quarter, and waning crescent
(C). identify and differentiate the causes of lunar and solar eclipses, including differentiating between lunar phases and eclipses
(9). Science concepts. The student knows that planets of different size, composition, and surface features orbit around the Sun. The student is expected to:
(B). compare the planets in terms of orbit, size, composition, rotation, atmosphere, natural satellites, and geological activity
(C). relate the role of Newton's law of universal gravitation to the motion of the planets around the Sun and to the motion of natural and artificial satellites around the planets
(D). explore the origins and significance of small solar system bodies, including asteroids, comets, and Kuiper belt objects
(10). Science concepts. The student knows the role of the Sun as the star in our solar system. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the approximate mass, size, motion, temperature, structure, and composition of the Sun
(B). distinguish between nuclear fusion and nuclear fission, and identify the source of energy within the Sun as nuclear fusion of hydrogen to helium
(C). describe the eleven-year solar cycle and the significance of sunspots
(11). Science concepts. The student knows the characteristics and life cycle of stars. The student is expected to:
(A). identify the characteristics of main sequence stars, including surface temperature, age, relative size, and composition
(B). characterize star formation in stellar nurseries from giant molecular clouds, to protostars, to the development of main sequence stars
(C). evaluate the relationship between mass and fusion on the dying process and properties of stars
(D). differentiate among the end states of stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes
(E). compare how the mass and gravity of a main sequence star will determine its end state as a white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole
(G). use the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to plot and examine the life cycle of stars from birth to death
(12). Science concepts. The student knows the variety and properties of galaxies. The student is expected to:
(A). describe characteristics of galaxies
(C). compare and contrast the different types of galaxies, including spiral, elliptical, irregular, and dwarf
(13). Science concepts. The student knows the scientific theories of cosmology. The student is expected to:
(A). research and describe the historical development of the Big Bang Theory, including red shift, cosmic microwave background radiation, and other supporting evidence
(C). research and describe scientific hypotheses of the fate of the universe, including open and closed universes and the role of dark matter and dark energy

§112.36. Earth and Space Science, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(1). Scientific processes. The student conducts laboratory and field investigations, for at least 40% of instructional time, using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A). demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(B). demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(2). Scientific processes. The student uses scientific methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(A). know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(2) of this section
(E). demonstrate the use of course equipment, techniques, and procedures, including computers and web-based computer applications
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(F). use a wide variety of additional course apparatuses, equipment, techniques, and procedures as appropriate such as satellite imagery and other remote sensing data, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), scientific probes, microscopes, telescopes, modern video and image libraries, weather stations, fossil and rock kits, bar magnets, coiled springs, wave simulators, tectonic plate models, and planetary globes
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3
(4). Earth in space and time. The student knows how Earth-based and space-based astronomical observations reveal differing theories about the structure, scale, composition, origin, and history of the universe. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate the evidence concerning the Big Bang model such as red shift and cosmic microwave background radiation and current theories of the evolution of the universe, including estimates for the age of the universe
(B). explain how the Sun and other stars transform matter into energy through nuclear fusion
(C). investigate the process by which a supernova can lead to the formation of successive generation stars and planets
(5). Earth in space and time. The student understands the solar nebular accretionary disk model. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze how gravitational condensation of solar nebular gas and dust can lead to the accretion of planetesimals and protoplanets
(B). investigate thermal energy sources, including kinetic heat of impact accretion, gravitational compression, and radioactive decay, which are thought to allow protoplanet differentiation into layers
(C). contrast the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteoroids and their positions in the solar system, including the orbital regions of the terrestrial planets, the asteroid belt, gas giants, Kuiper Belt, and Oort Cloud
(D). explore the historical and current hypotheses for the origin of the Moon, including the collision of Earth with a Mars-sized planetesimal
(E). compare terrestrial planets to gas-giant planets in the solar system, including structure, composition, size, density, orbit, surface features, tectonic activity, temperature, and suitability for life
(6). Earth in space and time. The student knows the evidence for how Earth's atmospheres, hydrosphere, and geosphere formed and changed through time. The student is expected to:
(D). evaluate the evidence that Earth's cooling led to tectonic activity, resulting in continents and ocean basins
(7). Earth in space and time. The student knows that scientific dating methods of fossils and rock sequences are used to construct a chronology of Earth's history expressed in the geologic time scale. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate relative dating methods using original horizontality, rock superposition, lateral continuity, cross-cutting relationships, unconformities, index fossils, and biozones based on fossil succession to determine chronological order
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(B). calculate the ages of igneous rocks from Earth and the Moon and meteorites using radiometric dating methods
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(C). understand how multiple dating methods are used to construct the geologic time scale, which represents Earth's approximate 4.6-billion-year history
(8). Earth in space and time. The student knows that fossils provide evidence for geological and biological evolution. Students are expected to:
(A). analyze and evaluate a variety of fossil types such as transitional fossils, proposed transitional fossils, fossil lineages, and significant fossil deposits with regard to their appearance, completeness, and alignment with scientific explanations in light of this fossil data
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(B). explain how sedimentation, fossilization, and speciation affect the degree of completeness of the fossil record
Fossils IWorksheets :4
Fossils IIWorksheets :3
(9). Solid Earth. The student knows Earth's interior is differentiated chemically, physically, and thermally. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate heat transfer through Earth's subsystems by radiation, convection, and conduction and include its role in plate tectonics, volcanism, ocean circulation, weather, and climate
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(B). examine the chemical, physical, and thermal structure of Earth's crust, mantle, and core, including the lithosphere and asthenosphere
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(C). explain how scientists use geophysical methods such as seismic wave analysis, gravity, and magnetism to interpret Earth's structure
Earth's CrustFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(10). Solid Earth. The student knows that plate tectonics is the global mechanism for major geologic processes and that heat transfer, governed by the principles of thermodynamics, is the driving force. The student is expected to:
(A). investigate how new conceptual interpretations of data and innovative geophysical technologies led to the current theory of plate tectonics
(B). describe how heat and rock composition affect density within Earth's interior and how density influences the development and motion of Earth's tectonic plates
(C). explain how plate tectonics accounts for geologic processes and features, including sea floor spreading, ocean ridges and rift valleys, subduction zones, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain ranges, hot spots, and hydrothermal vents
(D). calculate the motion history of tectonic plates using equations relating rate, time, and distance to predict future motions, locations, and resulting geologic features
(E). distinguish the location, type, and relative motion of convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries using evidence from the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes
(F). evaluate the role of plate tectonics with respect to long-term global changes in Earth's subsystems such as continental buildup, glaciation, sea level fluctuations, mass extinctions, and climate change
(11). Solid Earth. The student knows that the geosphere continuously changes over a range of time scales involving dynamic and complex interactions among Earth's subsystems. The student is expected to:
(A). compare the roles of erosion and deposition through the actions of water, wind, ice, gravity, and igneous activity by lava in constantly reshaping Earth's surface
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and ErosionWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). explain how plate tectonics accounts for geologic surface processes and features, including folds, faults, sedimentary basin formation, mountain building, and continental accretion
(C). analyze changes in continental plate configurations such as Pangaea and their impact on the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere through time
(D). interpret Earth surface features using a variety of methods such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, and topographic and geologic maps using appropriate technologies
Maps as Models of the EarthWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). evaluate the impact of changes in Earth's subsystems on humans such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, flooding, and storm surges and the impact of humans on Earth's subsystems such as population growth, fossil fuel burning, and use of fresh water
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(12). Solid Earth. The student knows that Earth contains energy, water, mineral, and rock resources and that use of these resources impacts Earth's subsystems. The student is expected to:
(A). evaluate how the use of energy, water, mineral, and rock resources affects Earth's subsystems
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(13). Fluid Earth. The student knows that the fluid Earth is composed of the hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere subsystems that interact on various time scales with the biosphere and geosphere. The student is expected to:
(A). quantify the components and fluxes within the hydrosphere such as changes in polar ice caps and glaciers, salt water incursions, and groundwater levels in response to precipitation events or excessive pumping
(B). analyze how global ocean circulation is the result of wind, tides, the Coriolis effect, water density differences, and the shape of the ocean basins
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). analyze the empirical relationship between the emissions of carbon dioxide, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and the average global temperature trends over the past 150 years
(D). discuss mechanisms and causes such as selective absorbers, major volcanic eruptions, solar luminance, giant meteorite impacts, and human activities that result in significant changes in Earth's climate
(14). Fluid Earth. The student knows that Earth's global ocean stores solar energy and is a major driving force for weather and climate through complex atmospheric interactions. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze the uneven distribution of solar energy on Earth's surface, including differences in atmospheric transparency, surface albedo, Earth's tilt, duration of insolation, and differences in atmospheric and surface absorption of energy
(B). investigate how the atmosphere is heated from Earth's surface due to absorption of solar energy, which is re-radiated as thermal energy and trapped by selective absorbers
(C). explain how thermal energy transfer between the ocean and atmosphere drives surface currents, thermohaline currents, and evaporation that influence climate
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(15). Fluid Earth. The student knows that interactions among Earth's five subsystems influence climate and resource availability, which affect Earth's habitability. The student is expected to:
(A). describe how changing surface-ocean conditions, including El Niño-Southern Oscillation, affect global weather and climate patterns
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(C). quantify the dynamics of surface and groundwater movement such as recharge, discharge, evapotranspiration, storage, residence time, and sustainability
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). analyze recent global ocean temperature data to predict the consequences of changing ocean temperature on evaporation, sea level, algal growth, coral bleaching, hurricane intensity, and biodiversity

§112.37. Environmental Systems, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011 (One Credit).

(c). Knowledge and skills.

(4). Science concepts. The student knows the relationships of biotic and abiotic factors within habitats, ecosystems, and biomes. The student is expected to:
(C). diagram abiotic cycles, including the rock, hydrologic, carbon, and nitrogen cycles
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(D). make observations and compile data about fluctuations in abiotic cycles and evaluate the effects of abiotic factors on local ecosystems and local biomes
The Rock CycleWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(E). measure the concentration of solute, solvent, and solubility of dissolved substances such as dissolved oxygen, chlorides, and nitrates and describe their impact on an ecosystem
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(6). Science concepts. The student knows the sources and flow of energy through an environmental system. The student is expected to:
(A). define and identify the components of the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere and the interactions among them
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(8). Science concepts. The student knows that environments change naturally. The student is expected to:
(A). analyze and describe the effects on areas impacted by natural events such as tectonic movement, volcanic events, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, flooding, tsunamis, and population growth
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). explain how regional changes in the environment may have a global effect
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(9). Science concepts. The student knows the impact of human activities on the environment. The student is expected to:
(A). identify causes of air, soil, and water pollution, including point and nonpoint sources
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(B). investigate the types of air, soil, and water pollution such as chlorofluorocarbons, carbon dioxide, pH, pesticide runoff, thermal variations, metallic ions, heavy metals, and nuclear waste
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(C). examine the concentrations of air, soil, and water pollutants using appropriate units
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
(E). evaluate the effect of human activities, including habitat restoration projects, species preservation efforts, nature conservancy groups, hunting, fishing, ecotourism, all terrain vehicles, and small personal watercraft, on the environment
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
(F). evaluate cost-benefit trade-offs of commercial activities such as municipal development, farming, deforestation, over-harvesting, and mining
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Common Core State StandardsConnecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNational STEM StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Common Core StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNext Generation Science Standards (NGSS Comprehensive)North Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR)Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirgin Islands Common Core StandardsVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards