South Carolina Standards & Learning for Sixth Grade Science

Birds and Mammals
A bird is an endothermic vertebrate that lays eggs, has feathers, and has a four- chambered heart. A mammal is an endothermic vertebrate that has skin covered with fur or hair, a four-chambered heart, a wide arrangement of teeth, and young that are born alive and feed by milk that was produced by the mother’s body. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Cell Transport
Active and Passive Cell transport. There are three main types of passive transport - Diffusion, Osmosis and Facilitated Diffusion. There are two types of active transport - Primary (direct) and Secondary (indirect). Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 2
Cells: The Basic Units of Life
The cell is the basic building blocks of all living organisms. There are many structures within the cell. The structures within the cell are known as organelles, which are all of the structures within the cell that carry out specific functions. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Diversity of life
There are many characteristics that scientists use to determine if something is alive. The characteristics are very specific and are applicable to all of the different species that exist on our planet. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Earth's Atmosphere
FreeThe Earth is unique in our solar system because it has an atmosphere that can support life. By comparison, Venus has an atmosphere that is high in ammonia and other caustic gases; it is so dense that it would crush a human. On the other hand, Mars has no atmosphere at all. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 6
Earth's energy resources
Renewable resources are resources that can be replenished in a reasonable amount of time. Nonrenewable resources are resources that, once consumed, cannot be replaced. Because oil, natural gas, and coal are the products of plants and organisms, they are known as fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are ultimately a limited resource, it is important to develop and use renewable energy resources. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Earth's Fresh Water
Fresh water moves over the surface by an interconnected system of streams and rivers. Small streams that feed water into larger rivers are called tributaries. Rivers are closely interconnected and flow from higher to lower elevations where the water collects in larger and larger rivers until it ultimately flows into the oceans. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Electricity
Charged Particles. Electric charges are either positive (+) or negative (-). The protons in an atom have a positive charge and the electrons around the atom have a negative charge. If two particles have similar charges, they repel each other, but, if they have opposite charges, they attract each other. This explains why an atom holds together. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. The placement of an electric current in a preexisting magnetic field can cause motion. When this happens, electrical energy is transformed into mechanical energy. The use of electrical energy to produce mechanical energy is the principle behind the workings of an electric motor. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles
Fish reproduce using external fertilization. External fertilization is when the female’s eggs are meeting with the male’s sperm outside of the female’s body. Three major groups are the jawless fish, cartilaginous fish, and bony fish. An amphibian is a vertebrate that is ectothermic. Most amphibians live the beginning of their lives in the water. A reptile is a vertebrate that is ectothermic and has scaly skin and a pair of lungs. Lizards, snakes, turtles, tortoises, and crocodiles are all examples of reptiles. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 5
Genetics - Study of Heredity
Heredity is the passing on of traits from parents to their offspring, either through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction, the offspring cells or organisms acquire the genetic information of their parents. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 8
Groundwater Resources
Groundwater is fresh water stored in regolith and bedrock. Even though solid rock like granite or marble has no pores, it often has a series of cracks and possibly faults. Water accumulates in the cracks in solid bedrock and, at times, is a source of water. A layer of rock material that can store water and allow the movement of water through the ground is called an aquifer. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Introduction to Animals
Scientists have discovered about 1.2 million different species of animals on our planet. Planet Earth is home to 8.7 million species, scientists estimate. Animals have adapted to feed on different types of food. There are animals that eat only animals (carnivores), animals that eat only plants (herbivores), and animals that eat both plants and animals (omnivores). Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Introduction to earth science
The field of Geology includes a number of specialized disciplines including: Mineralogy - the study of minerals, Paleontology - the study of fossils, Petrology - the study of rocks, Geophysics - the study of the physics of the Earth and its atmosphere, Meteorology - the study of weather and weather prediction, Seismology - the study of earthquakes, and Volcanology - the study of volcanoes. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Introduction to matter
Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Some of its properties are physical and would include such things as color, volume and weight. Other properties are chemical and deal with how matter chemically reacts with other materials. Matter can undergo both physical and chemical changes. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Magnetism
A magnet is any substance that attracts the element iron or anything with iron in it. All magnets have opposite ends or poles. These are referred to as the north and south poles. In addition, because of polarity, all magnets will point toward the magnetic north pole of the earth. While the greatest magnetic force is at the poles, there is some degree of magnetism all around a magnet. This is called the magnetic field. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Maps as models of the earth/Contour models
Geologists use a variety of different types of maps to model or depict the three-dimensional Earth on a two-dimensional surface. Each type of map serves a purpose because each type has its special strengths: Topographic Maps, Mercator Projections, Conic Projections, Azimuthal Projections. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Mollusks, Arthropods and Echinoderms
FreeA molusk is an invertibrate that has an un-segmented, soft body that is almost always protected by outer shells. Snails, octopuses, clams, and oysters are all species of mollusks. Arthropods are invertebrates with external skeletons, segmented bodies, and appendages. Appendages are structures that are jointed and attached to the body. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 7
Moving and Controlling the Body
Tissues are collections of cells of different types that interact to support the function of the tissues, organs and overall organ system. The brain and spinal cord communicate with all other parts of the body through the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system. Sensory neurons carry impulses toward the brains and spinal cord. Motor neurons carry impulses away from the brain and interneurons carry impulses within the brain and spinal cord. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Our impact on earth
Any waste substance that is added to a natural system in amounts greater than that natural system can break it down or eliminate it is called pollution. The waste substance itself is the pollutant. A natural resource that can be replenished is called a renewable resource. In most cases, water is a renewable resource. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Plant Processes
Photosynthesis is a process powered by sunlight that uses carbon dioxide and water to produce oxygen and food. The process requires six molecules of water and six molecules of carbon dioxide. These molecules undergo chemical changes and oxygen and sugars like glucose are produced. The oxygen is let go through the stomata and the sugars are used to power cell functions. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Plant reproduction
An angiosperm is a plant that produces seeds within a fruit. Reproduction begins when the pollen from the anther is in contact with the stigma. Eventually the egg will be fertilized in the ovule that is in the ovary and turn from a zygote to an embryo inside the seed. The life cycle of angiosperms among the different species is very similar: Pollination, fertilization, and the development of fruit. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Plate Tectonics
The Earth's layers: crust, mantle, core. Plate tectonics is a scientific theory that describes the large-scale motion of plates of the Earth's crust over hot mantle rock. Plate tectonics are active on Earth since the very beginning. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Protection, Reproduction and Cooperation
The human body protects itself with non-specific defense systems that react naturally and automatically to invading organisms. Your skin, with its layers of protective tissue, is a very strong, watertight barrier to environmental pathogens. What is an Antigen? A antigen is a molecule that immune system can recognize as either part of the body or as foreign to the body. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2
Providing Fuel and Transportation
Food is stored and processed in your stomach, so that your body can gain access to the nutrients in the food. Your body relies on what you eat and drink to maintain healthy tissues and to generate the energy. There are six categories of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 3
Rocks
There are three major groupings of rocks: igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary. Igneous rocks form when liquid rock cools and hardens. Sedimentary rocks: Clastic, Chemical, Biochemical or organic. Metamorphic rocks: foliated and non-foliated (or massive). Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 3
Six Kingdoms of Life
The six Kingdoms are: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Fungi, Protists, Plants and Animals. Fungi include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts. Protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba. Eubacteria are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus. Animals are divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Solids, liquids and gases
Matter exists in three different states or phases: solid, liquids and gases or vapors. A solid has a definite shape and volume, A liquid has a definite volume but no definite shape and A gas has neither a definite volume nor shape. Gases or vapors are influenced by three factors: temperature, volume and pressure. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Sponges, Cnidarians and Worms
Until recently, people thought that sponges were plants. The fact that they take in food puts them into the animal kingdom. When they are adults, they do not move. They attach themselves to a hard surface where they live out their lives. The structure of a sponge is very basic with some specialized tissue, but lacking organs and organ systems. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Studying and exploring space
Edwin Powell Hubble (1889-1953) was an American astronomer who, in 1923, showed that the universe is expanding. He used photographs to prove that there are galaxies beyond our own. Prior to this, scientists believed that our galaxy was the entire universe. In 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (clearly named in honor of the great 20th century astronomer) was launched by NASA and has provided some of the most spectacular images of the universe ever seen. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Weather patterns
Air masses are extensive bodies of air that have similar temperatures and water content throughout. The boundary or line delineating different air masses is the weather front. A small weather system that has intense energy that creates heavy rains, high winds, and lightning is called a thunderstorm. A hurricane is an extremely large, tropical, rotating weather system that has sustained winds of at least 119 km/hr. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 4
Work, Power & Simple Machines
. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2

SC.6.S. SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PRACTICES

6.S.1. The student will use the science and engineering practices, including the processes and skills of scientific inquiry, to develop understandings of science content.

6.S.1A. Conceptual Understanding: The practices of science and engineering support the development of science concepts, develop the habits of mind that are necessary for scientific thinking, and allow students to engage in science in ways that are similar to those used by scientists and engineers.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.S.1A.2. Develop, use, and refine models to (1) understand or represent phenomena, processes, and relationships, (2) test devices or solutions, or (3) communicate ideas to others.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6.S.1A.3. Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to answer questions, test hypotheses, and develop explanations: (1) formulate scientific questions and testable hypotheses, (2) identify materials, procedures, and variables, (3) select and use appropriate tools or instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and (4) record and represent data in an appropriate form. Use appropriate safety procedures.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6.S.1A.4. Analyze and interpret data from informational texts, observations, measurements, or investigations using a range of methods (such as tabulation, graphing, or statistical analysis) to (1) reveal patterns and construct meaning or (2) support hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6.S.1A.6. Construct explanations of phenomena using (1) primary or secondary scientific evidence and models, (2) conclusions from scientific investigations, (3) predictions based on observations and measurements, or (4) data communicated in graphs, tables, or diagrams.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

SC.6.E. EARTH SCIENCE: EARTH’S WEATHER AND CLIMATE

6.E.2. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the interactions within Earth’s systems (flow of energy) that regulate weather and climate.

6.E.2A. Conceptual Understanding: Earth’s atmosphere, an envelope of gases that surround the planet, makes conditions on Earth suitable for living things and influences weather. Water is always moving between the atmosphere (troposphere) and the surface of Earth as a result of the force of gravity and energy from the Sun. The Sun is the driving energy source for heating Earth and for the circulation of Earth’s atmosphere.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.E.2A.1. Develop and use models to exemplify the properties of the atmosphere (including the gases, temperature and pressure differences, and altitude changes) and the relative scale in relation to the size of Earth.
Earth's freshwater and atmosphere
Planet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
6.E.2A.2. Critically analyze scientific arguments based on evidence for and against how different phenomena (natural and human induced) may contribute to the composition of Earth’s atmosphere.
Earth's freshwater and atmosphere
Planet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
6.E.2A.3. Construct explanations of the processes involved in the cycling of water through Earth’s systems (including transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, precipitation, and downhill flow of water on land).
Earth's freshwater and atmosphere
Planet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
6.E.2B. Conceptual Understanding: The complex patterns of changes and movement of water in the atmosphere determined by winds, landforms, ocean temperatures and currents, and convection are major determinants of local weather patterns and climate. Technology has enhanced our ability to measure and predict weather patterns.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.E.2B.2. Develop and use models to explain how relationships between the movement and interactions of air masses, high and low pressure systems, and frontal boundaries result in weather conditions and storms (including thunderstorms, hurricanes and tornadoes).
Weather, Weather patterns and climate
How do clouds form? Main types of clouds. Precipitation. Air Pressure. What are the Four Most Influential Air Masses that Affect the Weather in North America? What is needed for a thunderstorm to occur? Thunderstorm key ingredients: Moisture, Instability and Uplift. What is a hurricane? What is a tornado? What is climate? Climate Zones: Polar zone, Temperate zone, Tropical zone. The location of the zone determines its climate. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
6.E.2B.4. Construct explanations for how climate is determined in an area (including latitude, elevation, shape of the land, distance from water, global winds, and ocean currents).
Weather, Weather patterns and climate
How do clouds form? Main types of clouds. Precipitation. Air Pressure. What are the Four Most Influential Air Masses that Affect the Weather in North America? What is needed for a thunderstorm to occur? Thunderstorm key ingredients: Moisture, Instability and Uplift. What is a hurricane? What is a tornado? What is climate? Climate Zones: Polar zone, Temperate zone, Tropical zone. The location of the zone determines its climate. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5

SC.6.P. PHYSICAL SCIENCE: ENERGY TRANSFER AND CONSERVATION

6.P.3. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties of energy, the transfer and conservation of energy, and the relationship between energy and forces.

6.P.3A. Conceptual Understanding: Energy manifests itself in multiple forms, such as mechanical (kinetic energy and potential energy), electrical, chemical, radiant (solar), and thermal energy. According to the principle of conservation of energy, energy cannot be created nor destroyed, but it can be transferred from one place to another and transformed between systems.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.P.3A.1. Analyze and interpret data to describe the properties and compare sources of different forms of energy (including mechanical, electrical, chemical, radiant, and thermal).
Properties of matter and Energy
What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Kinetic energy is energy that is happening now; it is energy in motion. Potential energy is energy that is waiting to happen; it is stored energy. How does heat get transferred: By conduction, by convection and by radiation. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.P.3A.2. Develop and use models to exemplify the conservation of energy as it is transformed from kinetic to potential (gravitational and elastic) and vice versa.
Properties of matter and Energy
What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Kinetic energy is energy that is happening now; it is energy in motion. Potential energy is energy that is waiting to happen; it is stored energy. How does heat get transferred: By conduction, by convection and by radiation. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.P.3A.5. Develop and use models to describe and compare the directional transfer of heat through convection, radiation, and conduction.
Properties of matter and Energy
What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Kinetic energy is energy that is happening now; it is energy in motion. Potential energy is energy that is waiting to happen; it is stored energy. How does heat get transferred: By conduction, by convection and by radiation. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.P.3A.6. Design and test devices that minimize or maximize heat transfer by conduction, convection, or radiation.
Properties of matter and Energy
What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Kinetic energy is energy that is happening now; it is energy in motion. Potential energy is energy that is waiting to happen; it is stored energy. How does heat get transferred: By conduction, by convection and by radiation. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.P.3B. Conceptual Understanding: Energy transfer occurs when two objects interact thereby exerting force on each other. It is the property of an object or a system that enables it to do work (force moving an object over a distance). Machines are governed by this application of energy, work, and conservation of energy.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.P.3B.1. Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to provide evidence for how the design of simple machines (including levers, pulleys, inclined planes) helps transfer mechanical energy by reducing the amount of force required to do work.
Newton's Laws of motion
What is motion? Motion is the process of an object changing its place or its position. Motion is not speed. Speed is the rate an object changes position. Newton's law of motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

SC.6.L. LIFE SCIENCE: DIVERSITY OF LIFE-CLASSIFICATION AND ANIMALS

6.L.4. The student will demonstrate an understanding of how scientists classify organisms and how the structures, processes, behaviors, and adaptations of animals allow them to survive.

6.L.4A. Conceptual Understanding: Life is the quality that differentiates living things (organisms) from nonliving objects or those that were once living. All organisms are made up of cells, need food and water, a way to dispose of waste, and an environment in which they can live. Because of the diversity of life on Earth, scientists have developed a way to organize groups of organisms according to their characteristic traits, making it easier to identify and study them.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.L.4A.2. Develop and use models to classify organisms based on the current hierarchical taxonomic structure (including the kingdoms of protists, plants, fungi, and animals).
The 6-Kingdoms of life
Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
6.L.4B. Conceptual Understanding: The Animal Kingdom includes a diversity of organisms that have many characteristics in common. Classification of animals is based on structures that function in growth, reproduction, and survival. Animals have both structural and behavioral adaptations that increase the chances of reproduction and survival in changing environments.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.L.4B.1. Analyze and interpret data related to the diversity of animals to support claims that all animals (vertebrates and invertebrates) share common characteristics.
The 6-Kingdoms of life
Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Animal Diversity and Adaptations
FreeHere are some examples of the systems that animals and humans have in common: Integumentary system, Muscular system, Endocrine system, Nervous system, Circulatory system, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Excretory System, Reproductive system, Immune system, Skeletal System. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
6.L.4B.2. Obtain and communicate information to explain how the structural adaptations and processes of animals allow for defense, movement, or resource obtainment.
Animal Diversity and Adaptations
FreeHere are some examples of the systems that animals and humans have in common: Integumentary system, Muscular system, Endocrine system, Nervous system, Circulatory system, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Excretory System, Reproductive system, Immune system, Skeletal System. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
6.L.4B.3. Construct explanations of how animal responses (including hibernation, migration, grouping, and courtship) to environmental stimuli allow them to survive and reproduce.
Animal Diversity and Adaptations
FreeHere are some examples of the systems that animals and humans have in common: Integumentary system, Muscular system, Endocrine system, Nervous system, Circulatory system, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Excretory System, Reproductive system, Immune system, Skeletal System. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Energy and ecosystems
An ecosystem includes all the living and non-living things in an area. This includes populations and communities of many different animals. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
6.L.4B.4. Obtain and communicate information to compare and classify innate and learned behaviors in animals.
Animal Diversity and Adaptations
FreeHere are some examples of the systems that animals and humans have in common: Integumentary system, Muscular system, Endocrine system, Nervous system, Circulatory system, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Excretory System, Reproductive system, Immune system, Skeletal System. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
Energy and ecosystems
An ecosystem includes all the living and non-living things in an area. This includes populations and communities of many different animals. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3

SC.6.L. LIFE SCIENCE: DIVERSITY OF LIFE-PROTISTS, FUNGI AND PLANTS

6.L.5. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the structures, processes, and responses that allow protists, fungi, and plants to survive and reproduce.

6.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: The Protist Kingdom is one of the most diverse groups and includes organisms that have characteristics similar to but are not classified as plants, animals, or fungi. These microorganisms live in moist environments and vary in how they obtain energy and move. The Fungi Kingdom consists of organisms that do not make their own food (heterotrophs) but obtain their nutrition through external absorption. Fungi can be grouped by their growth habit or fruiting structure and respond to changes in the environmental stimuli similar to plants.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.L.5A.1. Analyze and interpret data from observations to compare how the structures of protists (including euglena, paramecium, and amoeba) and fungi allow them to obtain energy and explore their environment.
The 6-Kingdoms of life
Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
6.L.5A.2. Analyze and interpret data to describe how fungi respond to external stimuli (including temperature, light, touch, water, and gravity).
The 6-Kingdoms of life
Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
6.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: The Plant Kingdom consists of organisms that primarily make their own food (autotrophs) and are commonly classified based on internal structures that function in the transport of food and water. Plants have structural and behavioral adaptations that increase the chances of reproduction and survival in changing environments.
Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
6.L.5B.1. Construct explanations of how the internal structures of vascular and nonvascular plants transport food and water.
Roots, Stems and Leaves
Plants have two different root systems: a Taproot and a Fibrous Root system. Leaves of a plant are made of plant organs and tissues. The top layer of leaf, which protects the leaf, is called its epidermis. Leaves have tiny openings underneath them called the stomata which let air and water in and out of the leaf. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.L.5B.2. Analyze and interpret data to explain how the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration work together to meet the needs of plants.
Roots, Stems and Leaves
Plants have two different root systems: a Taproot and a Fibrous Root system. Leaves of a plant are made of plant organs and tissues. The top layer of leaf, which protects the leaf, is called its epidermis. Leaves have tiny openings underneath them called the stomata which let air and water in and out of the leaf. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
6.L.5B.3. Develop and use models to compare structural adaptations and processes that flowering plants use for defense, survival and reproduction.
Plants with and without seeds
There are many plants in the world. Some are plants that you know of and many you have never heard of before! The Fern’s Life Cycle. The Life Cycle of Moss. Monocots vs. Dicots….what are these? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
6.L.5B.4. Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine how changes in environmental factors (such as air, water, light, minerals, or space) affect the growth and development of a flowering plant.
Plant Responses and Adaptations
A plant can respond to the conditions of its environment. A plant can change its position and grow in a certain direction or manner to meet its survival needs and adapt to a varying environment. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
6.L.5B.5. Analyze and interpret data to describe how plants respond to external stimuli (including temperature, light, touch, water, and gravity).
Plant Responses and Adaptations
A plant can respond to the conditions of its environment. A plant can change its position and grow in a certain direction or manner to meet its survival needs and adapt to a varying environment. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

SC.CC.RST.6-8. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RST.6-8.7. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

SC.CC.WHST.6-8. Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Text Types and Purposes

WHST.6-8.1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
WHST.6-8.1(e) Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
WHST.6-8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
WHST.6-8.2(d) Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
WHST.6-8.2(f) Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Production and Distribution of Writing

WHST.6-8.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
The nature of science
Science process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Standards

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