Utah Core Standards for High School Biology

Chromosomes, Genes and DNAChromosomes are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the hereditary material in humans and most of other organisms. Specific sections of the DNA are called genes. Each gene provides the cell with different information. Each chromosome is made up of many genes. There are about about 100000 genes found on human chromosomes. A gene is made up of a particular sequence of DNA bases. This sequence acts as a code for a protein. The production of different proteins determines the trait (inherited characteristic) of an organism. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Food Chains and Food WebsBiological dynamics of Earth. Relationships within a community: predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, commensalism. Construct a food chain. Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level). Compare and contrast food webs and food chains. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2
Genetics and heredity IIBy whom were first described the principles of dominance, segregation, and independent assortment? What did Gregor Mendel discover using the results of his experiments with plant crosses? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Splindle fibers, Telophase, Trait, Transcription, Mutation, Phenotype. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 7
Introduction to plantsWhich woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 5
MeiosisMeiosis is a process where a single cell divides twice to produce four cells containing half the original amount of genetic information. These cells are our sex cells – sperm in males, eggs in females. Prophase I - a phase of meiosis during which chromosomes thicken and homologous pairs of chromosomes move together. Metaphase I - a phase of meiosis I during which homologous pairs of chromosomes line up in the center of the cell. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Microorganisms IHyphae - threadlike filaments of branching cells that make up the bodies of multicellular fungi. Gymnosperm - group of vascular plants that develop seeds without a protective outer covering; they do not produce flowers or fruit. Flagellum - a tail-like structure found on bacteria and select protists which helps them to move. Volvox - a freshwater, chlorophyll-containing green alga, that occurs in ball-shaped colonies. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 5
Microorganisms IITaxonomy is the classification of all known living organisms that shows relationships between different organisms. Pseudopod is false feet; temporary fingerlike projections a one-celled organism, such as an amoeba, uses to move. Protozoa - single-celled, animal-like protist that has the ability to move. Mycelium - a mass of fungal hyphae that absorbs nutrients. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 5
MitosisStructures and functions of living organisms: Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organ Systems. Differentiate between the processes of mitosis and meiosis. Describe different cell parts and their functions. Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 3
Pond MicrolifeFood vacuole - a small sac-like structure in which captured food is digested. Micronucleus - the smaller of the two nuclei present in some protozoa that contains the genetic material and controls cell reproduction. Paramecium - a single-celled protozoan covered with hair-like cilia, found in many freshwater habitats. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 4
The Study of HeredityHeredity refers to the genetic heritage passed down by our biological parents when certain traits are passed from the parents to the children. Traits are characteristics such as height, hair color etc... Heredity is passed through genes in the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. DNA is a molecule that contains the biological instructions that make each species unique. Read more...iWorksheets: 2Vocabulary Sets: 3

UT.1. Biology: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

The science of biologyThe processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

UT.4. Biology: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

Genetics and heredity IHow many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7

UT.5. Biology: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Awareness of Social and Historical Aspects of Science.

5.b. Give instances of how technological advances have influenced the progress of science and how science has influenced advances in technology.

Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4

5.d. Recognize contributions to science knowledge that have been made by both women and men.

Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

UT.I. Biology: Students will understand that living organisms interact with one another and their environment.

I.1. Summarize how energy flows through an ecosystem.

I.1.a. Arrange components of a food chain according to energy flow.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
I.1.b. Compare the quantity of energy in the steps of an energy pyramid.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

I.2. Explain relationships between matter cycles and organisms.

I.2.a. Use diagrams to trace the movement of matter through a cycle (i.e., carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, water) in a variety of biological communities and ecosystems.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
I.2.b. Explain how water is a limiting factor in various ecosystems.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

I.3. Describe how interactions among organisms and their environment help shape ecosystems.

I.3.a. Categorize relationships among living things according to predator-prey, competition, and symbiosis.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

UT.II. Biology: Students will understand that all organisms are composed of one or more cells that are made of molecules, come from preexisting cells, and perform life functions.

II.1. Describe the fundamental chemistry of living cells.

II.1.c. Explain how the properties of water (e.g., cohesion, adhesion, heat capacity, solvent properties) contribute to maintenance of cells and living organisms.
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7

II.2. Describe the flow of energy and matter in cellular function.

II.2.a. Distinguish between autotrophic and heterotrophic cells.
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
II.2.b. Illustrate the cycling of matter and the flow of energy through photosynthesis (e.g., by using light energy to combine CO2 and H2O to produce oxygen and sugars) and respiration (e.g., by releasing energy from sugar and O2 to produce CO2 and H2O).
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
II.2.c. Measure the production of one or more of the products of either photosynthesis or respiration.
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

II.3. Investigate the structure and function of cells and cell parts.

II.3.a. Explain how cells divide from existing cells.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
II.3.b. Describe cell theory and relate the nature of science to the development of cell theory (e.g., built upon previous knowledge, use of increasingly more sophisticated technology).
Introduction to cellsAll living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
II.3.c. Describe how the transport of materials in and out of cells enables cells to maintain homeostasis (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport).
Cell processesFreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
II.3.d. Describe the relationship between the organelles in a cell and the functions of that cell.
Cell structure and functionMatch each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
II.3.e. Experiment with microorganisms and/or plants to investigate growth and reproduction.
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

UT.III. Biology: Students will understand the relationship between structure and function of organs and organ systems.

III.1. Describe the structure and function of organs.

III.1.a. Diagram and label the structure of the primary components of representative organs in plants and animals (e.g., heart - muscle tissue, valves and chambers; lung - trachea, bronchial, alveoli; leaf - veins, stomata; stem - xylem, phloem, cambium; root - tip, elongation, hairs; skin - layers, sweat glands, oil glands, hair follicles; ovaries - ova, follicles, corpus luteum).
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.1.b. Describe the function of various organs (e.g. heart, lungs, skin, leaf, stem, root, ovary).
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
InvertebratesInvertebrates are animals that don't have a backbone. More than 90 percent of all living animal species are invertebrates. Familiar examples of invertebrates include arthropods, mollusks, annelid, and cnidarians. Like vertebrates, most invertebrates reproduce at least partly through sexual reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates IVertebrates - animals that have a backbone. The word comes from vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine. Five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. A few tens of thousands of species have been identified. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.1.c. Relate the structure of organs to the function of organs.
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
InvertebratesInvertebrates are animals that don't have a backbone. More than 90 percent of all living animal species are invertebrates. Familiar examples of invertebrates include arthropods, mollusks, annelid, and cnidarians. Like vertebrates, most invertebrates reproduce at least partly through sexual reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates IVertebrates - animals that have a backbone. The word comes from vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine. Five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. A few tens of thousands of species have been identified. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.1.d. Compare the structure and function of organs in one organism to the structure and function of organs in another organism.
Plant structure and functionPlants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Introduction to animalsClassification - the process of grouping items together according to their similarities. Kingdom - large category included in scientific classification system and the taxonomic category above phylum; scientists recognize six kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, protista, eubacteria, and archaebacteria. Vertebrates - animals that have a backbone; five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
InvertebratesInvertebrates are animals that don't have a backbone. More than 90 percent of all living animal species are invertebrates. Familiar examples of invertebrates include arthropods, mollusks, annelid, and cnidarians. Like vertebrates, most invertebrates reproduce at least partly through sexual reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates IVertebrates - animals that have a backbone. The word comes from vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine. Five main groups of vertebrates: fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. A few tens of thousands of species have been identified. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.1.e. Research and report on technological developments related to organs.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7

III.2. Describe the relationship between structure and function of organ systems in plants and animals.

III.2.a. Relate the function of an organ to the function of an organ system.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.2.b. Describe the structure and function of various organ systems (i.e., digestion, respiration, circulation, protection and support, nervous) and how these systems contribute to homeostasis of the organism.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.2.c. Examine the relationships of organ systems within an organism (e.g., respiration to circulation, leaves to roots) and describe the relationship of structure to function in the relationship.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.2.d. Relate the tissues that make up organs to the structure and function of the organ.
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
III.2.e. Compare the structure and function of organ systems in one organism to the structure and function in another organism (e.g., chicken to sheep digestive system; fern to peach reproductive system).
Human biology IBronchi - large tubules that branch from the trachea to carry air in and out of the lungs. Capillaries - the smallest blood vessels found in very rich networks between arteries and veins; the site where many substances are exchanged. Antibodies - a specific protein produced by B lymphocytes that attaches to an antigen and leads to its removal. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology IIAntigen - a molecule that the immune system recognizes as part of the body or foreign to the body. Appendicular skeleton - a part of the skeleton composed of 126 bones found in the flexible regions of the body, including shoulders, hips and limbs. Axial skeleton - the central, anchoring part of the bony skeleton that consists of the skull, backbone (vertebrae) and rib cage. Bile - a chemical produced by the liver and stored temporarily in the gall bladder that is released into the intestines to help in fat digestion. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7

UT.IV. Biology: Students will understand that genetic information coded in DNA is passed from parents to offspring by sexual and asexual reproduction. The basic structure of DNA is the same in all living things. Changes in DNA may alter genetic expression.

IV.1. Compare sexual and asexual reproduction.

IV.1.a. Explain the significance of meiosis and fertilization in genetic variation.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
IV.1.c. Formulate, defend, and support a perspective of a bioethical issue related to intentional or unintentional chromosomal mutations.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
DNA technology/genetic engineeringThis topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

IV.2. Predict and interpret patterns of inheritance in sexually reproducing organisms.

IV.2.a. Explain Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment and their role in genetic inheritance.
Genetics and heredity IHow many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7

IV.3. Explain how the structure and replication of DNA are essential to heredity and protein synthesis.

IV.3.a. Use a model to describe the structure of DNA.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
IV.3.b. Explain the importance of DNA replication in cell reproduction.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
IV.3.c. Summarize how genetic information encoded in DNA provides instructions for assembling protein molecules.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.3.d. Describe how mutations may affect genetic expression and cite examples of mutagens.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.3.e. Relate the historical events that lead to our present understanding of DNA to the cumulative nature of science knowledge and technology.
Cell ReproductionThe process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesisThe term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

UT.V. Biology: Students will understand that biological diversity is a result of evolutionary processes.

V.1. Relate principles of evolution to biological diversity.

V.1.a. Describe the effects of environmental factors on natural selection.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.2. Cite evidence for changes in populations over time and use concepts of evolution to explain these changes.

V.2.c. Relate the nature of science to the historical development of the theory of evolution.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.3. Classify organisms into a hierarchy of groups based on similarities that reflect their evolutionary relationships.

V.3.a. Classify organisms using a classification tool such as a key or field guide.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.3.b. Generalize criteria used for classification of organisms (e.g., dichotomy, structure, broad to specific).
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.3.d. Justify the ongoing changes to classification schemes used in biology.
Evolution and classificationCategorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

UT.1. Chemistry: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.i. Use mathematics as a precise method for showing relationships.

ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.3. Chemistry: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.4. Chemistry: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.6. Chemistry: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3

UT.I. Chemistry: Students will understand that all matter in the universe has a common origin and is made of atoms, which have structure and can be systematically arranged on the periodic table.

I.1. Recognize the origin and distribution of elements in the universe.

I.1.b. Recognize that all matter in the universe and on earth is composed of the same elements.
I.1.c. Identify the distribution of elements in the universe.

I.2. Relate the structure, behavior, and scale of an atom to the particles that compose it.

I.2.c. Discriminate between the relative size, charge, and position of protons, neutrons, and electrons in the atom.
MagnetismWorksheets :3
I.2.d. Generalize the relationship of proton number to the element's identity.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.2.e. Relate the mass and number of atoms to the gram-sized quantities of matter in a mole.
The MoleWorksheets :3

I.3. Correlate atomic structure and the physical and chemical properties of an element to the position of the element on the periodic table.

I.3.a. Use the periodic table to correlate the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in an atom.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.3.b. Compare the number of protons and neutrons in isotopes of the same element.
Nuclear ChemistryWorksheets :3
I.3.c. Identify similarities in chemical behavior of elements within a group.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.3.d. Generalize trends in reactivity of elements within a group to trends in other groups.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.3.e. Compare the properties of elements (e.g., metal, nonmetallic, metalloid) based on their position in the periodic table.
Elements - Set IWorksheets :3
Elements - Set IIWorksheets :3

UT.II. Chemistry: Students will understand the relationship between energy changes in the atom specific to the movement of electrons between energy levels in an atom resulting in the emission or absorption of quantum energy. They will also understand that the emission of high-energy particles results from nuclear changes and that matter can be converted to energy during nuclear reactions.

II.2. Evaluate how changes in the nucleus of an atom result in emission of radioactivity.

II.2.d. Compare the strong nuclear force to the amount of energy released in a nuclear reaction and contrast it to the amount of energy released in a chemical reaction.
Nuclear ChemistryWorksheets :3

UT.III. Chemistry: Students will understand chemical bonding and the relationship of the type of bonding to the chemical and physical properties of substances.

III.2. Explain that the properties of a compound may be different from those of the elements or compounds from which it is formed.

III.2.a. Use a chemical formula to represent the names of elements and numbers of atoms in a compound and recognize that the formula is unique to the specific compound.
III.2.b. Compare the physical properties of a compound to the elements that form it.
III.2.c. Compare the chemical properties of a compound to the elements that form it.
III.2.d. Explain that combining elements in different proportions results in the formation of different compounds with different properties.

III.3. Relate the properties of simple compounds to the type of bonding, shape of molecules, and intermolecular forces.

III.3.a. Generalize, from investigations, the physical properties (e.g., malleability, conductivity, solubility) of substances with different bond types.
Organic ChemistryWorksheets :3

UT.IV. Chemistry: Students will understand that in chemical reactions matter and energy change forms, but the amounts of matter and energy do not change.

IV.1. Identify evidence of chemical reactions and demonstrate how chemical equations are used to describe them.

IV.1.d. Recognize that the number of atoms in a chemical reaction does not change.
Chemical EquationsWorksheets :3
IV.1.e. Determine the molar proportions of the reactants and products in a balanced chemical reaction.
Chemical EquationsWorksheets :3
The MoleWorksheets :3
IV.1.f. Investigate everyday chemical reactions that occur in a student's home (e.g., baking, rusting, bleaching, cleaning).

IV.2. Analyze evidence for the laws of conservation of mass and conservation of energy in chemical reactions.

IV.2.c. Report evidence of energy transformations in a chemical reaction.
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4
IV.2.d. After observing or measuring, classify evidence of temperature change in a chemical reaction as endothermic or exothermic.
IV.2.e. Using either a constructed or a diagrammed electrochemical cell, describe how electrical energy can be produced in a chemical reaction (e.g., half reaction, electron transfer).
IV.2.f. Using collected data, report the loss or gain of heat energy in a chemical reaction.
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.V. Chemistry: Students will understand that many factors influence chemical reactions and some reactions can achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium.

V.1. Evaluate factors specific to collisions (e.g., temperature, particle size, concentration, and catalysts) that affect the rate of chemical reaction.

V.1.a. Design and conduct an investigation of the factors affecting reaction rate and use the findings to generalize the results to other reactions.
V.1.b. Use information from graphs to draw warranted conclusions about reaction rates.
V.1.d. Identify that catalysts are effective in increasing reaction rates.

V.2. Recognize that certain reactions do not convert all reactants to products, but achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium that can be changed.

V.2.a. Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium.
V.2.b. Given an equation, identify the effect of adding either product or reactant to a shift in equilibrium.
V.2.c. Indicate the effect of a temperature change on the equilibrium, using an equation showing a heat term.
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.VI. Chemistry: Students will understand the properties that describe solutions in terms of concentration, solutes, solvents, and the behavior of acids and bases.

VI.1. Describe factors affecting the process of dissolving and evaluate the effects that changes in concentration have on solutions.

VI.1.a. Use the terms solute and solvent in describing a solution.
SolutionsWorksheets :3
VI.1.c. Describe the relative amount of solute particles in concentrated and dilute solutions and express concentration in terms of molarity and molality.
The MoleWorksheets :3
VI.1.e. Relate the concept of parts per million (PPM) to relevant environmental issues found through research.
The MoleWorksheets :3

VI.3. Differentiate between acids and bases in terms of hydrogen ion concentration.

VI.3.a. Relate hydrogen ion concentration to pH values and to the terms acidic, basic or neutral.
Acids, Bases and SaltsFreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1
VI.3.d. Research and report on the uses of acids and bases in industry, agriculture, medicine, mining, manufacturing, or construction.

UT.1. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals IIWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

UT.3. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

UT.5. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Awareness of Social and Historical Aspects of Science.

5.b. Give instances of how technological advances have influenced the progress of science and how science has influenced advances in technology.

Lab investigations/scientific methodA biologist reported success in breeding a tiger with a lion, producing healthy offspring. Other biologists will accept this report as fact only if other researchers can replicate the experiment. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

5.d. Recognize contributions to science knowledge that have been made by both women and men.

UT.6. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

6.h. Understand that scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results and honest and ethical reporting of findings. These values function as criteria in distinguishing between science and non-science.

UT.I. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed.

I.1. Describe the big bang theory and evidence supporting it.

I.1.a. Determine the motion of a star relative to Earth based on a red or blue shift in the wavelength of light from the star.
I.1.b. Explain how evidence of red and blue shifts is used to determine whether the universe is expanding or contracting.
I.1.d. Investigate and report how science has changed the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe throughout history.

I.2. Relate the structure and composition of the solar system to the processes that exist in the universe.

I.2.b. Relate the life cycle of stars of various masses to the relative mass of elements produced.
I.2.e. Compare the life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars.

UT.II. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that the features of Earth's evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system.

II.2. Analyze how ecosystems differ from each other due to abiotic and biotic factors.

II.2.b. Observe and list biotic factors (e.g., plants, animals, organic matter) that affect a specific ecosystem (e.g., wetlands, deserts, aquatic).
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
II.2.d. Explain that energy enters the vast majority of Earth's ecosystems through photosynthesis, and compare the path of energy through two different ecosystems.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

II.3. Examine Earth's diversity of life as it changes over time.

II.3.a. Observe and chart the diversity in a specific area.
Vertebrates IIA vertebrate is an animal with a spinal cord surrounded by cartilage or bone. The vertebrates are also characterized by a muscular system consisting primarily of bilaterally paired masses and a central nervous system partly enclosed within the backbone. The 7 classes of vertebrates are: Class Aves, Class Reptilia, Class Agnatha, Class Amphibia, Class Mammalia, Class Osteichthyes, Class Chondrichthyes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
II.3.b. Compare the diversity of life in various biomes specific to number of species, biomass, and type of organisms.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

UT.III. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth's plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems.

III.1. Explain the evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics.

III.1.a. Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.
III.1.b. Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.
III.1.c. Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.
III.1.d. Explain Alfred Wegener's continental drift hypothesis, his evidence, and why it was not accepted in his time.
III.1.e. Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

III.2. Describe the processes within Earth that result in plate motion and relate it to changes in other Earth systems.

III.2.a. Identify the energy sources that cause material to move within Earth.
III.2.b. Model the movement of materials within Earth.
III.2.c. Model the movement and interaction of plates.
III.2.d. Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.
III.2.e. Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

UT.IV. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system.

IV.1. Explain the water cycle in terms of its reservoirs, the movement between reservoirs, and the energy to move water. Evaluate the importance of freshwater to the biosphere.

IV.1.b. Illustrate the movement of water on Earth and describe how the processes that move water (e.g., evaporation of water, melting of ice/snow, ocean currents, movement of water vapor by wind) use energy from the sun.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.c. Relate the physical and chemical properties of water to a water pollution issue.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.d. Make inferences about the quality and/or quantity of freshwater, using data collected from local water systems.

IV.2. Analyze the physical and biological dynamics of the oceans.

IV.2.a. Describe the physical dynamics of the oceans (e.g., wave action, ocean currents, El Nino, tides).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.b. Determine how physical properties of oceans affect organisms (e.g., salinity, depth, tides, temperature).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.e. Describe how changing sea levels could affect life on Earth.

UT.V. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

V.1. Describe how matter in the atmosphere cycles through other Earth systems.

V.1.b. Diagram the nitrogen cycle and provide examples of human actions that affect this cycle (e.g., fertilizers, crop rotation, fossil fuel combustion).
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
V.1.c. Interpret evidence suggesting that humans are influencing the carbon cycle.
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
V.1.d. Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

V.2. Trace ways in which the atmosphere has been altered by living systems and has itself strongly affected living systems over the course of Earth's history.

V.2.a. Define ozone and compare its effects in the lower and upper atmosphere.
V.2.b. Describe the role of living organisms in producing the ozone layer and how the ozone layer affected the development of life on Earth.
V.2.c. Compare the rate at which CO2 is put into the atmosphere to the rate at which it is removed through the carbon cycle.
Ecology IMatch each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology IIMatch each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

UT.VI. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems.

VI.1. Describe the transformation of solar energy into heat and chemical energy on Earth and eventually the radiation of energy to space.

VI.1.b. Describe the pathways for converting and storing light energy as chemical energy (e.g., light energy converted to chemical energy stored in plants, plants become fossil fuel).
Photosynthesis and respirationPhotosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
VI.1.d. Demonstrate how absorbed solar energy eventually leaves the Earth system as heat radiating to space.
VI.1.e. Construct a model that demonstrates the reduction of heat loss due to a greenhouse effect.
VI.1.f. Research global changes and relate them to Earth systems (e.g., global warming, solar fluctuations).

VI.2. Relate energy sources and transformation to the effects on Earth systems.

VI.2.a. Describe the difference between climate and weather, and how technology is used to monitor changes in each.
VI.2.b. Describe the effect of solar energy on the determination of climate and weather (e.g., El Nino, solar intensity).
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
VI.2.c. Explain how uneven heating at the equator and polar regions creates atmospheric and oceanic convection currents that move heat energy around Earth.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
VI.2.e. Relate how weather patterns are the result of interactions among ocean currents, air currents, and topography.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

The Science of ChemistryWhich substance is a binary compound - ammonia, argon, glucose or glycerol? Which molecule is polar and contains polar bonds? Which atom will form an ionic bond with a Br atom - N, Li, O or C? By which process is petroleum separated into its components according to their different boiling points? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

1.i. Use mathematics as a precise method for showing relationships.

UT.3. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.4. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.b. Use precise scientific language in oral and written communication.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

UT.6. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.I. Physics: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

I.1. Describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, and velocity. (Related Internet Resources)

I.1.a. Calculate the average velocity of a moving object using data obtained from measurements of position of the object at two or more times.
I.1.b. Distinguish between distance and displacement.
I.1.c. Distinguish between speed and velocity.
MechanicsWorksheets :3
I.1.d. Determine and compare the average and instantaneous velocity of an object from data showing its position at given times.
I.1.e. Collect, graph, and interpret data for position vs. time to describe the motion of an object and compare this motion to the motion of another object.

I.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of velocity, time, and acceleration. (Related Internet Resources)

I.2.a. Determine the average acceleration of an object from data showing velocity at given times.
I.2.b. Describe the velocity of an object when its acceleration is zero.
MechanicsWorksheets :3
I.2.c. Collect, graph, and interpret data for velocity vs. time to describe the motion of an object.
I.2.d. Describe the acceleration of an object moving in a circular path at constant speed (i.e., constant speed, but changing direction).
I.2.e. Analyze the velocity and acceleration of an object over time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3

I.4. Use Newton's first law to explain the motion of an object. (Related Internet Resources)

I.4.a. Describe the motion of a moving object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.4.b. Describe the motion of a stationary object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
I.4.c. Describe the balanced forces acting on a moving object commonly encountered (e.g., forces acting on an automobile moving at constant velocity, forces that maintain a body in an upright position while walking).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3

UT.II. Physics: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

II.1. Analyze forces acting on an object. (Related Internet Resources)

II.1.a. Observe and describe forces encountered in everyday life (e.g., braking of an automobile - friction, falling rain drops - gravity, directional compass - magnetic, bathroom scale - elastic or spring).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
MechanicsWorksheets :3
MagnetismWorksheets :3

II.3. Explain that forces act in pairs as described by Newton's third law. (Related Internet Resources)

II.3.d. Relate the historical development of Newton's laws of motion to our current understanding of the nature of science (e.g., based upon previous knowledge, empirical evidence, replicable observations, development of scientific law).

UT.III. Physics: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

III.1. Relate the strength of the gravitational force to the distance between two objects and the mass of the objects (i.e., Newton's law of universal gravitation). (Related Internet Resources)

III.1.b. Distinguish between mass and weight.
MechanicsWorksheets :3
III.1.d. Explain how evidence and inference are used to describe fundamental forces in nature, such as the gravitational force.

III.2. Describe the factors that affect the electric force (i.e., Coulomb's law). (Related Internet Resources)

III.2.a. Relate the types of charge to their effect on electric force (i.e., like charges repel, unlike charges attract).
III.2.d. Research and report on electric forces in everyday applications found in both nature and technology (e.g., lightning, living organisms, batteries, copy machine, electrostatic precipitators).
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4

UT.IV. Physics: Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

IV.1. Determine kinetic and potential energy in a system. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.1.a. Identify various types of potential energy (i.e., gravitational, elastic, chemical, electrostatic, nuclear).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
Forces - Set IIWorksheets :3
HeatWorksheets :3
IV.1.b. Calculate the kinetic energy of an object given the velocity and mass of the object.
Matter and EnergyMatter is any substance that has mass and takes up space. Energy can be transferred as heat or as work. Energy is a property that matter has. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Work and EnergyWorksheets :4
HeatWorksheets :3
IV.1.c. Describe the types of energy contributing to the total energy of a given system.

IV.2. Describe conservation of energy in terms of systems. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.2.b. Relate the transformations between kinetic and potential energy in a system (e.g., moving magnet induces electricity in a coil of wire, roller coaster, internal combustion engine).
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3

IV.3. Describe common energy transformations and the effect on availability of energy. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.3.a. Describe the loss of useful energy in energy transformations.
States of MatterThere are Four states of matter observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Matter in the solid state has a fixed volume and shape, with component particles (atoms, molecules or ions) close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state has a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.V. Physics: Students will understand the properties and applications of waves.

V.1. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanical waves in terms of general wave properties. (Related Internet Resources)

V.1.c. Provide examples of waves commonly observed in nature and/or used in technological applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
SoundWorksheets :3
V.1.d. Identify the relationship between the speed, wavelength, and frequency of a wave.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.1.e. Explain the observed change in frequency of a mechanical wave coming from a moving object as it approaches and moves away (i.e., Doppler effect).
SoundWorksheets :3

V.2. Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and visible light. (Related Internet Resources)

V.2.a. Describe the relationship of energy to wavelength or frequency for electromagnetic radiation.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
MagnetismWorksheets :3
V.2.b. Distinguish between the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio waves and x-rays or visible light and microwaves).
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.c. Explain that the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum all travel through empty space and at the same speed.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

UT.CC.RST.9-10. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Craft and Structure

RST.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RST.9-10.7. Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
ThermodynamicsWorksheets :4

UT.1. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals IIWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

UT.3. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

UT.5. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Awareness of Social and Historical Aspects of Science.

5.b. Give instances of how technological advances have influenced the progress of science and how science has influenced advances in technology.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

5.d. Recognize contributions to science knowledge that have been made by both women and men.

UT.6. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

6.h. Understand that scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results and honest and ethical reporting of findings. These values function as criteria in distinguishing between science and non-science.

UT.I. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed.

I.1. Describe the big bang theory and evidence supporting it.

I.1.a. Determine the motion of a star relative to Earth based on a red or blue shift in the wavelength of light from the star.
I.1.b. Explain how evidence of red and blue shifts is used to determine whether the universe is expanding or contracting.
I.1.d. Investigate and report how science has changed the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe throughout history.

I.2. Relate the structure and composition of the solar system to the processes that exist in the universe.

I.2.b. Relate the life cycle of stars of various masses to the relative mass of elements produced.
I.2.e. Compare the life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars.

UT.II. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that the features of Earth's evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system.

II.2. Analyze how ecosystems differ from each other due to abiotic and biotic factors.

II.2.b. Observe and list biotic factors (e.g., plants, animals, organic matter) that affect a specific ecosystem (e.g., wetlands, deserts, aquatic).
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

II.3. Examine Earth's diversity of life as it changes over time.

II.3.b. Compare the diversity of life in various biomes specific to number of species, biomass, and type of organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

UT.III. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth's plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems.

III.1. Explain the evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics.

III.1.a. Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.
III.1.b. Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.
III.1.c. Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.
III.1.d. Explain Alfred Wegener's continental drift hypothesis, his evidence, and why it was not accepted in his time.
III.1.e. Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

III.2. Describe the processes within Earth that result in plate motion and relate it to changes in other Earth systems.

III.2.a. Identify the energy sources that cause material to move within Earth.
III.2.b. Model the movement of materials within Earth.
III.2.c. Model the movement and interaction of plates.
III.2.d. Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.
III.2.e. Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

UT.IV. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system.

IV.1. Explain the water cycle in terms of its reservoirs, the movement between reservoirs, and the energy to move water. Evaluate the importance of freshwater to the biosphere.

IV.1.b. Illustrate the movement of water on Earth and describe how the processes that move water (e.g., evaporation of water, melting of ice/snow, ocean currents, movement of water vapor by wind) use energy from the sun.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.c. Relate the physical and chemical properties of water to a water pollution issue.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.d. Make inferences about the quality and/or quantity of freshwater, using data collected from local water systems.

IV.2. Analyze the physical and biological dynamics of the oceans.

IV.2.a. Describe the physical dynamics of the oceans (e.g., wave action, ocean currents, El Nino, tides).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.b. Determine how physical properties of oceans affect organisms (e.g., salinity, depth, tides, temperature).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.e. Describe how changing sea levels could affect life on Earth.

UT.V. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

V.1. Describe how matter in the atmosphere cycles through other Earth systems.

V.1.c. Interpret evidence suggesting that humans are influencing the carbon cycle.
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
V.1.d. Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

V.2. Trace ways in which the atmosphere has been altered by living systems and has itself strongly affected living systems over the course of Earth's history.

V.2.a. Define ozone and compare its effects in the lower and upper atmosphere.
V.2.b. Describe the role of living organisms in producing the ozone layer and how the ozone layer affected the development of life on Earth.

UT.VI. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems.

VI.1. Describe the transformation of solar energy into heat and chemical energy on Earth and eventually the radiation of energy to space.

VI.1.d. Demonstrate how absorbed solar energy eventually leaves the Earth system as heat radiating to space.
VI.1.e. Construct a model that demonstrates the reduction of heat loss due to a greenhouse effect.
VI.1.f. Research global changes and relate them to Earth systems (e.g., global warming, solar fluctuations).

VI.2. Relate energy sources and transformation to the effects on Earth systems.

VI.2.a. Describe the difference between climate and weather, and how technology is used to monitor changes in each.
VI.2.b. Describe the effect of solar energy on the determination of climate and weather (e.g., El Nino, solar intensity).
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
VI.2.c. Explain how uneven heating at the equator and polar regions creates atmospheric and oceanic convection currents that move heat energy around Earth.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
VI.2.e. Relate how weather patterns are the result of interactions among ocean currents, air currents, and topography.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

1.i. Use mathematics as a precise method for showing relationships.

UT.3. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.4. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.b. Use precise scientific language in oral and written communication.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

UT.6. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.I. Physics: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

I.1. Describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, and velocity. (Related Internet Resources)

I.1.a. Calculate the average velocity of a moving object using data obtained from measurements of position of the object at two or more times.
I.1.b. Distinguish between distance and displacement.
I.1.c. Distinguish between speed and velocity.
I.1.d. Determine and compare the average and instantaneous velocity of an object from data showing its position at given times.
I.1.e. Collect, graph, and interpret data for position vs. time to describe the motion of an object and compare this motion to the motion of another object.

I.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of velocity, time, and acceleration. (Related Internet Resources)

I.2.a. Determine the average acceleration of an object from data showing velocity at given times.
I.2.b. Describe the velocity of an object when its acceleration is zero.
I.2.c. Collect, graph, and interpret data for velocity vs. time to describe the motion of an object.
I.2.d. Describe the acceleration of an object moving in a circular path at constant speed (i.e., constant speed, but changing direction).
I.2.e. Analyze the velocity and acceleration of an object over time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

I.4. Use Newton's first law to explain the motion of an object. (Related Internet Resources)

I.4.a. Describe the motion of a moving object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.b. Describe the motion of a stationary object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.c. Describe the balanced forces acting on a moving object commonly encountered (e.g., forces acting on an automobile moving at constant velocity, forces that maintain a body in an upright position while walking).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

UT.II. Physics: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

II.1. Analyze forces acting on an object. (Related Internet Resources)

II.1.a. Observe and describe forces encountered in everyday life (e.g., braking of an automobile - friction, falling rain drops - gravity, directional compass - magnetic, bathroom scale - elastic or spring).

II.3. Explain that forces act in pairs as described by Newton's third law. (Related Internet Resources)

II.3.d. Relate the historical development of Newton's laws of motion to our current understanding of the nature of science (e.g., based upon previous knowledge, empirical evidence, replicable observations, development of scientific law).

UT.III. Physics: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

III.1. Relate the strength of the gravitational force to the distance between two objects and the mass of the objects (i.e., Newton's law of universal gravitation). (Related Internet Resources)

III.1.d. Explain how evidence and inference are used to describe fundamental forces in nature, such as the gravitational force.

III.2. Describe the factors that affect the electric force (i.e., Coulomb's law). (Related Internet Resources)

III.2.a. Relate the types of charge to their effect on electric force (i.e., like charges repel, unlike charges attract).
III.2.d. Research and report on electric forces in everyday applications found in both nature and technology (e.g., lightning, living organisms, batteries, copy machine, electrostatic precipitators).
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4

UT.IV. Physics: Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

IV.1. Determine kinetic and potential energy in a system. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.1.a. Identify various types of potential energy (i.e., gravitational, elastic, chemical, electrostatic, nuclear).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
IV.1.b. Calculate the kinetic energy of an object given the velocity and mass of the object.

UT.V. Physics: Students will understand the properties and applications of waves.

V.1. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanical waves in terms of general wave properties. (Related Internet Resources)

V.1.c. Provide examples of waves commonly observed in nature and/or used in technological applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.1.d. Identify the relationship between the speed, wavelength, and frequency of a wave.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

V.2. Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and visible light. (Related Internet Resources)

V.2.a. Describe the relationship of energy to wavelength or frequency for electromagnetic radiation.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.b. Distinguish between the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio waves and x-rays or visible light and microwaves).
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.c. Explain that the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum all travel through empty space and at the same speed.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

UT.1. Chemistry: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

UT.III. Chemistry: Students will understand chemical bonding and the relationship of the type of bonding to the chemical and physical properties of substances.

III.2. Explain that the properties of a compound may be different from those of the elements or compounds from which it is formed.

III.2.a. Use a chemical formula to represent the names of elements and numbers of atoms in a compound and recognize that the formula is unique to the specific compound.

UT.IV. Chemistry: Students will understand that in chemical reactions matter and energy change forms, but the amounts of matter and energy do not change.

IV.1. Identify evidence of chemical reactions and demonstrate how chemical equations are used to describe them.

IV.1.b. Compare the properties of reactants to the properties of products in a chemical reaction.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
IV.1.c. Use a chemical equation to describe a simple chemical reaction.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
IV.1.f. Investigate everyday chemical reactions that occur in a student's home (e.g., baking, rusting, bleaching, cleaning).
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

UT.V. Chemistry: Students will understand that many factors influence chemical reactions and some reactions can achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium.

V.1. Evaluate factors specific to collisions (e.g., temperature, particle size, concentration, and catalysts) that affect the rate of chemical reaction.

V.1.a. Design and conduct an investigation of the factors affecting reaction rate and use the findings to generalize the results to other reactions.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
V.1.b. Use information from graphs to draw warranted conclusions about reaction rates.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
V.1.c. Correlate frequency and energy of collisions to reaction rate.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals IIWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

UT.3. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

UT.5. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Awareness of Social and Historical Aspects of Science.

5.b. Give instances of how technological advances have influenced the progress of science and how science has influenced advances in technology.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

5.d. Recognize contributions to science knowledge that have been made by both women and men.

UT.6. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

6.h. Understand that scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results and honest and ethical reporting of findings. These values function as criteria in distinguishing between science and non-science.

UT.I. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed.

I.1. Describe the big bang theory and evidence supporting it.

I.1.a. Determine the motion of a star relative to Earth based on a red or blue shift in the wavelength of light from the star.
I.1.b. Explain how evidence of red and blue shifts is used to determine whether the universe is expanding or contracting.
I.1.d. Investigate and report how science has changed the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe throughout history.

I.2. Relate the structure and composition of the solar system to the processes that exist in the universe.

I.2.b. Relate the life cycle of stars of various masses to the relative mass of elements produced.
I.2.e. Compare the life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars.

UT.II. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that the features of Earth's evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system.

II.2. Analyze how ecosystems differ from each other due to abiotic and biotic factors.

II.2.b. Observe and list biotic factors (e.g., plants, animals, organic matter) that affect a specific ecosystem (e.g., wetlands, deserts, aquatic).
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

II.3. Examine Earth's diversity of life as it changes over time.

II.3.b. Compare the diversity of life in various biomes specific to number of species, biomass, and type of organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

UT.III. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth's plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems.

III.1. Explain the evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics.

III.1.a. Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.
III.1.b. Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.
III.1.c. Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.
III.1.d. Explain Alfred Wegener's continental drift hypothesis, his evidence, and why it was not accepted in his time.
III.1.e. Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

III.2. Describe the processes within Earth that result in plate motion and relate it to changes in other Earth systems.

III.2.a. Identify the energy sources that cause material to move within Earth.
III.2.b. Model the movement of materials within Earth.
III.2.c. Model the movement and interaction of plates.
III.2.d. Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.
III.2.e. Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

UT.IV. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system.

IV.1. Explain the water cycle in terms of its reservoirs, the movement between reservoirs, and the energy to move water. Evaluate the importance of freshwater to the biosphere.

IV.1.b. Illustrate the movement of water on Earth and describe how the processes that move water (e.g., evaporation of water, melting of ice/snow, ocean currents, movement of water vapor by wind) use energy from the sun.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.c. Relate the physical and chemical properties of water to a water pollution issue.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.d. Make inferences about the quality and/or quantity of freshwater, using data collected from local water systems.

IV.2. Analyze the physical and biological dynamics of the oceans.

IV.2.a. Describe the physical dynamics of the oceans (e.g., wave action, ocean currents, El Nino, tides).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.b. Determine how physical properties of oceans affect organisms (e.g., salinity, depth, tides, temperature).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.e. Describe how changing sea levels could affect life on Earth.

UT.V. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

V.1. Describe how matter in the atmosphere cycles through other Earth systems.

V.1.c. Interpret evidence suggesting that humans are influencing the carbon cycle.
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
V.1.d. Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

V.2. Trace ways in which the atmosphere has been altered by living systems and has itself strongly affected living systems over the course of Earth's history.

V.2.a. Define ozone and compare its effects in the lower and upper atmosphere.
V.2.b. Describe the role of living organisms in producing the ozone layer and how the ozone layer affected the development of life on Earth.

UT.VI. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems.

VI.1. Describe the transformation of solar energy into heat and chemical energy on Earth and eventually the radiation of energy to space.

VI.1.d. Demonstrate how absorbed solar energy eventually leaves the Earth system as heat radiating to space.
VI.1.e. Construct a model that demonstrates the reduction of heat loss due to a greenhouse effect.
VI.1.f. Research global changes and relate them to Earth systems (e.g., global warming, solar fluctuations).

VI.2. Relate energy sources and transformation to the effects on Earth systems.

VI.2.a. Describe the difference between climate and weather, and how technology is used to monitor changes in each.
VI.2.b. Describe the effect of solar energy on the determination of climate and weather (e.g., El Nino, solar intensity).
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
VI.2.c. Explain how uneven heating at the equator and polar regions creates atmospheric and oceanic convection currents that move heat energy around Earth.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
VI.2.e. Relate how weather patterns are the result of interactions among ocean currents, air currents, and topography.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

1.i. Use mathematics as a precise method for showing relationships.

UT.3. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.4. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.b. Use precise scientific language in oral and written communication.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

UT.6. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.I. Physics: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

I.1. Describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, and velocity. (Related Internet Resources)

I.1.a. Calculate the average velocity of a moving object using data obtained from measurements of position of the object at two or more times.
I.1.b. Distinguish between distance and displacement.
I.1.c. Distinguish between speed and velocity.
I.1.d. Determine and compare the average and instantaneous velocity of an object from data showing its position at given times.
I.1.e. Collect, graph, and interpret data for position vs. time to describe the motion of an object and compare this motion to the motion of another object.

I.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of velocity, time, and acceleration. (Related Internet Resources)

I.2.a. Determine the average acceleration of an object from data showing velocity at given times.
I.2.b. Describe the velocity of an object when its acceleration is zero.
I.2.c. Collect, graph, and interpret data for velocity vs. time to describe the motion of an object.
I.2.d. Describe the acceleration of an object moving in a circular path at constant speed (i.e., constant speed, but changing direction).
I.2.e. Analyze the velocity and acceleration of an object over time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

I.4. Use Newton's first law to explain the motion of an object. (Related Internet Resources)

I.4.a. Describe the motion of a moving object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.b. Describe the motion of a stationary object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.c. Describe the balanced forces acting on a moving object commonly encountered (e.g., forces acting on an automobile moving at constant velocity, forces that maintain a body in an upright position while walking).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

UT.II. Physics: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

II.1. Analyze forces acting on an object. (Related Internet Resources)

II.1.a. Observe and describe forces encountered in everyday life (e.g., braking of an automobile - friction, falling rain drops - gravity, directional compass - magnetic, bathroom scale - elastic or spring).

II.3. Explain that forces act in pairs as described by Newton's third law. (Related Internet Resources)

II.3.d. Relate the historical development of Newton's laws of motion to our current understanding of the nature of science (e.g., based upon previous knowledge, empirical evidence, replicable observations, development of scientific law).

UT.III. Physics: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

III.1. Relate the strength of the gravitational force to the distance between two objects and the mass of the objects (i.e., Newton's law of universal gravitation). (Related Internet Resources)

III.1.d. Explain how evidence and inference are used to describe fundamental forces in nature, such as the gravitational force.

III.2. Describe the factors that affect the electric force (i.e., Coulomb's law). (Related Internet Resources)

III.2.a. Relate the types of charge to their effect on electric force (i.e., like charges repel, unlike charges attract).
III.2.d. Research and report on electric forces in everyday applications found in both nature and technology (e.g., lightning, living organisms, batteries, copy machine, electrostatic precipitators).
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4

UT.IV. Physics: Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

IV.1. Determine kinetic and potential energy in a system. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.1.a. Identify various types of potential energy (i.e., gravitational, elastic, chemical, electrostatic, nuclear).
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
IV.1.b. Calculate the kinetic energy of an object given the velocity and mass of the object.

UT.V. Physics: Students will understand the properties and applications of waves.

V.1. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanical waves in terms of general wave properties. (Related Internet Resources)

V.1.c. Provide examples of waves commonly observed in nature and/or used in technological applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.1.d. Identify the relationship between the speed, wavelength, and frequency of a wave.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

V.2. Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and visible light. (Related Internet Resources)

V.2.a. Describe the relationship of energy to wavelength or frequency for electromagnetic radiation.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.b. Distinguish between the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio waves and x-rays or visible light and microwaves).
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.c. Explain that the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum all travel through empty space and at the same speed.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

UT.CC.RST.11-12. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Craft and Structure

RST.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.
Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :6Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

1.g. Develop and use classification systems.

Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals IIWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

UT.3. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

UT.5. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Awareness of Social and Historical Aspects of Science.

5.b. Give instances of how technological advances have influenced the progress of science and how science has influenced advances in technology.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3
Lab investigationsWorksheets :3

5.d. Recognize contributions to science knowledge that have been made by both women and men.

UT.6. Earth Systems Science: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

6.h. Understand that scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results and honest and ethical reporting of findings. These values function as criteria in distinguishing between science and non-science.

UT.I. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed.

I.1. Describe the big bang theory and evidence supporting it.

I.1.a. Determine the motion of a star relative to Earth based on a red or blue shift in the wavelength of light from the star.
I.1.b. Explain how evidence of red and blue shifts is used to determine whether the universe is expanding or contracting.
I.1.d. Investigate and report how science has changed the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe throughout history.

I.2. Relate the structure and composition of the solar system to the processes that exist in the universe.

I.2.b. Relate the life cycle of stars of various masses to the relative mass of elements produced.
I.2.e. Compare the life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars.

UT.II. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that the features of Earth's evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system.

II.2. Analyze how ecosystems differ from each other due to abiotic and biotic factors.

II.2.b. Observe and list biotic factors (e.g., plants, animals, organic matter) that affect a specific ecosystem (e.g., wetlands, deserts, aquatic).
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

II.3. Examine Earth's diversity of life as it changes over time.

II.3.b. Compare the diversity of life in various biomes specific to number of species, biomass, and type of organisms.
Rocks IWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

UT.III. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth's plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems.

III.1. Explain the evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics.

III.1.a. Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.
III.1.b. Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.
III.1.c. Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.
III.1.d. Explain Alfred Wegener's continental drift hypothesis, his evidence, and why it was not accepted in his time.
III.1.e. Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

III.2. Describe the processes within Earth that result in plate motion and relate it to changes in other Earth systems.

III.2.a. Identify the energy sources that cause material to move within Earth.
III.2.b. Model the movement of materials within Earth.
III.2.c. Model the movement and interaction of plates.
III.2.d. Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.
III.2.e. Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

UT.IV. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system.

IV.1. Explain the water cycle in terms of its reservoirs, the movement between reservoirs, and the energy to move water. Evaluate the importance of freshwater to the biosphere.

IV.1.b. Illustrate the movement of water on Earth and describe how the processes that move water (e.g., evaporation of water, melting of ice/snow, ocean currents, movement of water vapor by wind) use energy from the sun.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.c. Relate the physical and chemical properties of water to a water pollution issue.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.1.d. Make inferences about the quality and/or quantity of freshwater, using data collected from local water systems.

IV.2. Analyze the physical and biological dynamics of the oceans.

IV.2.a. Describe the physical dynamics of the oceans (e.g., wave action, ocean currents, El Nino, tides).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.b. Determine how physical properties of oceans affect organisms (e.g., salinity, depth, tides, temperature).
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
IV.2.e. Describe how changing sea levels could affect life on Earth.

UT.V. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

V.1. Describe how matter in the atmosphere cycles through other Earth systems.

V.1.c. Interpret evidence suggesting that humans are influencing the carbon cycle.
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
V.1.d. Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).
The AtmosphereWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

V.2. Trace ways in which the atmosphere has been altered by living systems and has itself strongly affected living systems over the course of Earth's history.

V.2.a. Define ozone and compare its effects in the lower and upper atmosphere.
V.2.b. Describe the role of living organisms in producing the ozone layer and how the ozone layer affected the development of life on Earth.

UT.VI. Earth Systems Science: Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems.

VI.1. Describe the transformation of solar energy into heat and chemical energy on Earth and eventually the radiation of energy to space.

VI.1.d. Demonstrate how absorbed solar energy eventually leaves the Earth system as heat radiating to space.
VI.1.e. Construct a model that demonstrates the reduction of heat loss due to a greenhouse effect.
VI.1.f. Research global changes and relate them to Earth systems (e.g., global warming, solar fluctuations).

VI.2. Relate energy sources and transformation to the effects on Earth systems.

VI.2.a. Describe the difference between climate and weather, and how technology is used to monitor changes in each.
VI.2.b. Describe the effect of solar energy on the determination of climate and weather (e.g., El Nino, solar intensity).
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
VI.2.c. Explain how uneven heating at the equator and polar regions creates atmospheric and oceanic convection currents that move heat energy around Earth.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
VI.2.e. Relate how weather patterns are the result of interactions among ocean currents, air currents, and topography.
OceansWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather IIWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3

UT.1. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Use Science Process and Thinking Skills.

1.d. Select and use appropriate technological instruments to collect and analyze data.

1.i. Use mathematics as a precise method for showing relationships.

UT.3. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of Science Concepts, Principles and Systems.

3.c. Apply principles and concepts of science to explain various phenomena.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

3.d. Solve problems by applying science principles and procedures.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.4. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Communicate Effectively Using Science Language and Reasoning.

4.b. Use precise scientific language in oral and written communication.

4.e. Use mathematical language and reasoning to communicate information.

UT.6. Physics: Intended Learning Outcome: Demonstrate Understanding of the Nature of Science.

6.a. Science is a way of knowing that is used by many people, not just scientists.

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

6.b. Understand that science investigations use a variety of methods and do not always use the same set of procedures; understand that there is not just one 'scientific method.'

Lab InvestigationsWorksheets :3

UT.I. Physics: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

I.1. Describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, and velocity. (Related Internet Resources)

I.1.a. Calculate the average velocity of a moving object using data obtained from measurements of position of the object at two or more times.
I.1.b. Distinguish between distance and displacement.
I.1.c. Distinguish between speed and velocity.
I.1.d. Determine and compare the average and instantaneous velocity of an object from data showing its position at given times.
I.1.e. Collect, graph, and interpret data for position vs. time to describe the motion of an object and compare this motion to the motion of another object.

I.2. Analyze the motion of an object in terms of velocity, time, and acceleration. (Related Internet Resources)

I.2.a. Determine the average acceleration of an object from data showing velocity at given times.
I.2.b. Describe the velocity of an object when its acceleration is zero.
I.2.c. Collect, graph, and interpret data for velocity vs. time to describe the motion of an object.
I.2.d. Describe the acceleration of an object moving in a circular path at constant speed (i.e., constant speed, but changing direction).
I.2.e. Analyze the velocity and acceleration of an object over time.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

I.4. Use Newton's first law to explain the motion of an object. (Related Internet Resources)

I.4.a. Describe the motion of a moving object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.b. Describe the motion of a stationary object on which balanced forces are acting.
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
I.4.c. Describe the balanced forces acting on a moving object commonly encountered (e.g., forces acting on an automobile moving at constant velocity, forces that maintain a body in an upright position while walking).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4

UT.II. Physics: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

II.1. Analyze forces acting on an object. (Related Internet Resources)

II.1.a. Observe and describe forces encountered in everyday life (e.g., braking of an automobile - friction, falling rain drops - gravity, directional compass - magnetic, bathroom scale - elastic or spring).

II.3. Explain that forces act in pairs as described by Newton's third law. (Related Internet Resources)

II.3.d. Relate the historical development of Newton's laws of motion to our current understanding of the nature of science (e.g., based upon previous knowledge, empirical evidence, replicable observations, development of scientific law).

UT.III. Physics: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

III.1. Relate the strength of the gravitational force to the distance between two objects and the mass of the objects (i.e., Newton's law of universal gravitation). (Related Internet Resources)

III.1.d. Explain how evidence and inference are used to describe fundamental forces in nature, such as the gravitational force.

III.2. Describe the factors that affect the electric force (i.e., Coulomb's law). (Related Internet Resources)

III.2.a. Relate the types of charge to their effect on electric force (i.e., like charges repel, unlike charges attract).
III.2.d. Research and report on electric forces in everyday applications found in both nature and technology (e.g., lightning, living organisms, batteries, copy machine, electrostatic precipitators).
Electric CircuitsWorksheets :4

UT.IV. Physics: Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

IV.1. Determine kinetic and potential energy in a system. (Related Internet Resources)

IV.1.a. Identify various types of potential energy (i.e., gravitational, elastic, chemical, electrostatic, nuclear).
Forces - Set IWorksheets :4
IV.1.b. Calculate the kinetic energy of an object given the velocity and mass of the object.

UT.V. Physics: Students will understand the properties and applications of waves.

V.1. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanical waves in terms of general wave properties. (Related Internet Resources)

V.1.c. Provide examples of waves commonly observed in nature and/or used in technological applications.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.1.d. Identify the relationship between the speed, wavelength, and frequency of a wave.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

V.2. Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and visible light. (Related Internet Resources)

V.2.a. Describe the relationship of energy to wavelength or frequency for electromagnetic radiation.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.b. Distinguish between the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio waves and x-rays or visible light and microwaves).
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
V.2.c. Explain that the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum all travel through empty space and at the same speed.
Vibrations and WavesVibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

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