Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) for Seventh Grade English Language Arts

Kinds of Sentences
There are four different kinds of sentences: A declarative sentence makes a statement. An exclamatory sentence expresses a strong emotion. An interrogative sentence asks a question. An imperative sentence gives a command. Example: A declarative sentence: My dog is a West Highland white terrier. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Letter Writing
There are two types of letters, friendly letters and business letters. In a friendly letter, there are five parts: the heading, the salutation, the body, the closing, and the signature. In a business letter, there are six parts: the heading, the inside address, the salutation, the body, the closing, and the signature. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Nouns
What Is a Noun? A noun is the name of a person, place, thing, or idea. A common noun names a class of people, places, things, or ideas. A proper noun, which is always capitalized, names a particular person, place, thing, or idea. A noun showing ownership is called a possessive noun. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Process Writing
The stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Punctuation
What Are Punctuation Marks? Punctuation marks are symbols to help readers understand how to read sentences. Examples: Period-ending marks, abbreviations; Question mark-ending marks; Exclamation point-ending marks; Comma-separating items or words, direct address, dates. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Reading Process
What Is the Reading Process? The steps a student follows in reading effectively are called the reading process. The step in the reading process when a student looks over the selection is. Certain genres of literature need to be read more than once. This step in the reading process is called rereading. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Speaking
Speaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Study Skills
What Are Study Skills? Study Skills are methods and techniques that assist the student in studying more efficiently. Examples: following directions carefully; asking questions; keeping an assignment book; practicing time management skills Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Subject and Verb Agreement
What Is Subject and Verb Agreement? Whether a word is singular or plural is called its number. In a sentence, the subject and the verb must agree in number. Singular subject = singular verb; Plural subject = plural verb. The subject of a sentence is not found in the prepositional phrase. The coach, along with the soccer players, is celebrating. The subject of the sentence is coach, not soccer players, so the subject is singular. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Usage
What Is Usage? The way in which the English language is used is known as usage. To speak and write our language properly, certain rules must be followed. Examples: a and an: Use a before a word that starts with a consonant sound and an before a word that has a vowel sound (a cartoon, an orangutan). Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1

TX.STAAR.7R. STAAR Grade 7 Reading Assessment

Reporting Category 1: Understanding and Analysis Across Genres - The student will demonstrate an ability to understand and analyze a variety of written texts across reading genres.

(7.2) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
7.2 (A) Determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Root Words
A root is the basic element of a word. It is the foundation on which the meaning of the word is built. Prefixes and suffixes are added to root words to form new words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Structural Analysis
In order to derive the meanings of words, it is helpful to analyze the structure of the words in our language: Is there a Latin or a Greek root word? Is the word a base word that can stand alone? Are there prefixes and suffixes added to the base word? Is the word a shortened form of a longer word? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reading-Structural Analysis
What is Structural Analysis in Reading? In order to derive the meanings of words, it is helpful to analyze the structure of the words in English: Is there a Latin or a Greek root word? Is the word a base word that can stand alone? Are there prefixes and suffixes added to the base word? What are the meanings of the affixes added to the base word? Is the word a shortened form of a longer word? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.2 (B) Use context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or ambiguous words. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Context Clues
Context clues are clues found in a text that may help you figure out the definition of a word that you do not know. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Vocabulary
Your vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vocabulary
What Is Vocabulary? Vocabulary refers to a collection of words. Our English vocabulary developed in a variety of ways: Names of people and places provide some English words. Rudolf Diesel invented an engine that is named after him. The first letters of words, called acronyms, provide new words for our language. Shortened words provide some new English words. The word hamburger provides the shortened word burger. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.2 (E) Use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Using a Thesaurus
Use a thesaurus for synonyms and antonyms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of a Book
Books may contain several parts that help the readers find information quickly and easily: Tables of Contents, Index, Glossary, headings, graphic organizers, charts, bold or italicized text. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Dictionary Skills
A dictionary is a useful tool in the study of words. Words are listed alphabetically in a dictionary so that they are easy to find. We look up words in a dictionary to find out about the word, including how to use it, what it means, and other important attributes of the word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Using References
What is a Reference? A reference is a book or an online source where a student can find facts. Examples: Encyclopedia, Atlas, Dictionary, Thesaurus, Almanac, Magazine, Pamphlet, Catalog. What reference is the Guinness Book of World Records? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.9) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.9 (A) Explain the difference between the theme of a literary work and the author's purpose in an expository text. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Author's Purpose/Point of View
Author’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Author's Purpose
The Author's Purpose is the reason that the author wrote the piece. If the author's purpose is to inform, he/she plans to teach the reader. If the author's purpose is to entertain, he/she plans to amuse the reader. If the author's purpose is to persuade, he/she plans to convince the reader to believe his/her point of view. If the author's purpose is to create a mood, he/she plans to use much description to stir emotions in the reader. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(Figure 19) Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author's message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
Figure 19 (F) Make connections between and across texts, including other media (e.g., film, play), and provide textual evidence. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository Text
Expository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Reporting Category 2: Understanding and Analysis of Literary Texts - The student will demonstrate an ability to understand and analyze literary texts.

(7.3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.3 (A) Describe multiple themes in a work of fiction. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.3 (C) Analyze how place and time influence the theme or message of a literary work. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.5 (A) Explain a playwright's use of dialogue and stage directions. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reading-Drama
Drama is a genre that uses dialogue to tell a story. The elements of drama are: characters, setting, plot and theme. A list of characters in the play is called the cast. The place and time of the play is known as the setting. The main events in the play make up the plot. The main idea of the play is called the theme. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.6 (A) Explain the influence of the setting on plot development. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.6 (B) Analyze the development of the plot through the internal and external responses of the characters, including their motivations and conflicts. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.8) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.8 (A) Determine the figurative meaning of phrases and analyze how an author's use of language creates imagery, appeals to the senses, and suggests mood. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Figurative Language
FreeLiteral language uses words exactly according to their conventionally accepted meanings. Figurative use of language is the use of words or phrases that implies a non-literal meaning which does make sense. When authors use figurative language, they use similes, metaphors, hyperbole, onomatopoeia, personification and idioms to make their writing more descriptive. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Narrative Text
What is Narrative Writing? Writing that tells a story is known as narrative writing. A narrative that tells a story based on imagined events is known as a fictional narrative. The characters, setting, and plot make up the elements of a story. Characters-the people involved in the plot of a narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reading-Figurative Language
Figurative language is the opposite of literal language. The writer uses techniques like repetition, exaggeration, alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia, similes, and metaphors to create images in the reader's mind. Using a sound, word, or phrase more than once is known as repetition. When a writer intentionally stretches the truth, he/she is using exaggeration. When a writer repeats a consonant sound at the beginning of several words in a row, he/she is using alliteration. Poems are divided into groups of lines called stanzas. Words that end with the same sound are called rhyming words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.13) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
7.13 (A) Interpret both explicit and implicit messages in various forms of media. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Listening and Viewing
An effective listener: has eye contact with the speaker, listens for the purpose of the speech, asks the speaker questions at the appropriate time, does not interrupt the speaker. An effective viewer: looks for the purpose in an advertisement, notices the date in a magazine or newspaper, searches for the labels on exhibits. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(Figure 19) Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author's message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
Figure (D) Make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding. Readiness Standard (Fiction) / Supporting Standard (Literary Nonfiction, Poetry, Drama) (STAAR)
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository Text
Expository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Figure (E) Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order within a text and across texts. Readiness Standard (Fiction) / Supporting Standard (Literary Nonfiction, Poetry, Drama) (STAAR)
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Reporting Category 3: Understanding and Analysis of Informational Texts - The student will demonstrate an ability to understand and analyze informational texts.

(7.10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
7.10 (A) Evaluate a summary of the original text for accuracy of the main ideas, supporting details, and overall meaning. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository Text
Expository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.10 (B) Distinguish factual claims from commonplace assertions and opinions. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Fact/Opinion/Exaggeration
Recognize fact, opinion, and exaggeration. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause/Effect, Fact/Opinion
Cause and effect refers to the relationship between two events. A cause is why something happens and an effect is what happened as a result of that cause. A fact is information that is known to be true. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.10 (C) Use different organizational patterns as guides for summarizing and forming an overview of different kinds of expository text. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.10 (D) Synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres, and support those findings with textual evidence. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository Text
Expository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to:
7.11 (A) Analyze the structure of the central argument in contemporary policy speeches (e.g., argument by cause and effect, analogy, authority) and identify the different types of evidence used to support the argument. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Decoding Strategies
Analogy, word structure, syntax, and semantics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Analogies
What is an Analogy? An analogy is a comparison of two different things that have something particular in common. An analogy is a comparison based on a similarity. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Figurative Language
FreeLiteral language uses words exactly according to their conventionally accepted meanings. Figurative use of language is the use of words or phrases that implies a non-literal meaning which does make sense. When authors use figurative language, they use similes, metaphors, hyperbole, onomatopoeia, personification and idioms to make their writing more descriptive. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Persuasive Text
What is Persuasive Text? Persuade means to convince. In persuasive text, the author attempts to convince the reader to believe that the author's viewpoint is correct. Some common persuasive techniques are: Bandwagon, Stacking the Deck, Testimonials, Citing Statistics, and Emotional Words. An author uses the Bandwagon technique when he/she tries to make us believe that we should do something because everyone is doing it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.11 (B) Identify such rhetorical fallacies as ad hominem, exaggeration, stereotyping, or categorical claims in persuasive texts. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Literary Elements/Poetic Devices
A literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reading-Figurative Language
Figurative language is the opposite of literal language. The writer uses techniques like repetition, exaggeration, alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia, similes, and metaphors to create images in the reader's mind. Using a sound, word, or phrase more than once is known as repetition. When a writer intentionally stretches the truth, he/she is using exaggeration. When a writer repeats a consonant sound at the beginning of several words in a row, he/she is using alliteration. Poems are divided into groups of lines called stanzas. Words that end with the same sound are called rhyming words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(7.12) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:
7.12 (B) Explain the function of the graphical components of a text. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Reading Graphics
What Is a Graphic? A visual aid that helps the reader understand information more easily is known as a graphic. Examples: Graphs-circle graphs, bar graphs, line graphs, picture graphs, Time lines, Illustrations, Photographs, Charts, Diagrams, Political cartoons, Maps. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? The elements of a textbook that are useful in helping to understand the content of the book are called the text features. An effective reader uses the text features to preview the textbook before beginning to read: The title page contains the title of the book, the author, the publisher, and the place where the book was published. The glossary contains the definitions of words from the textbook. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
(7.13) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
7.13 (A) Interpret both explicit and implicit messages in various forms of media. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Listening and Viewing
An effective listener: has eye contact with the speaker, listens for the purpose of the speech, asks the speaker questions at the appropriate time, does not interrupt the speaker. An effective viewer: looks for the purpose in an advertisement, notices the date in a magazine or newspaper, searches for the labels on exhibits. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
(Figure 19) Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author's message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
Figure (D) Make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding. Readiness Standard (Expository) / Supporting Standard (Culture and History, Persuasive) (STAAR)
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository Text
Expository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Figure (E) Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order within a text and across texts. Readiness Standard (Expository) / Supporting Standard (Persuasive) (STAAR)
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

TX.STAAR.7W. STAAR Grade 7 Writing Assessment

Reporting Category 1: Composition - The student will demonstrate an ability to compose a variety of written texts with a clear, controlling idea; coherent organization; sufficient development; and effective use of language and conventions.

(7.14) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
7.14 (C) Revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
(7.17) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
7.17 (A) Write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that: Readiness Standard
7.17 (A) (i) Presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs (STAAR)
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.17 (A) (iv) Accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources (STAAR)
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.17 (A) (v) Uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs (STAAR)
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Reporting Category 2: Revision - The student will demonstrate an ability to revise a variety of written texts.

(7.14) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
7.14 (C) Revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
(7.17) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
7.17 (A) Write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
7.17 (A) (i) Presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.17 (A) (iv) Accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
What are Thinking Skills? Thinking skills are reading tools used to better comprehend the text. Examples: Analysis-separating the text into its parts; Classifying-arranging information into categories; Comparing and Contrasting-finding likenesses and differences between items; Drawing Conclusions-coming to a decision based on the text; Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.17 (A) (v) Uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Reporting Category 3: Editing - The student will demonstrate an ability to edit a variety of texts.

(7.19) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
7.19 (A) Identify, use, and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking: Readiness Standard
7.19 (A) (i) Verbs (perfect and progressive tenses) and participles. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Verbs
What Is a Verb? A verb is the part of speech that expresses action or state of being. Examples: There are two types of verbs: action verbs (ran, jumped) and linking verbs (is, was). A linking verb is also called a verb of being. A transitive verb has an object, while an intransitive verb does not have an object. A verb phrase is made up of a verb and one or more helping verbs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Gerunds, Infinitives, and Participles
What is a Gerund? A gerund is a verb that is used as a noun. A gerund is formed by adding -ing to the present form of a verb. What is an Infinitive? An infinitive is a verb that is used as a noun, adjective, or adverb. The word to is known as the sign of the infinitive. What is a Participle? A participle is a verb that is used as an adjective. The two types of participles are present participles and past participles. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.19 (A) (iii) Adverbial and adjectival phrases and clauses. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Sentences
What is a Sentence? A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. A sentence must contain a subject and a predicate. An incomplete sentence is known as a sentence fragment. Two or more sentences written together are known as a run-on sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.19 (A) (iv) Conjunctive adverbs (e.g., consequently, furthermore, indeed). Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Vocabulary
Your vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.19 (A) (v) Prepositions and prepositional phrases and their influence on subject-verb agreement. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Prepositions, Conjunctions, and Interjections
What is a Preposition? A preposition is a connective that shows a relationship between the noun or pronoun following the preposition and another word in the sentence. What is a Conjunction? A conjunction is a word that connects words, phrases, or simple sentences. What is an Interjection? An interjection is a word or group of words that expresses strong feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Sentences
What is a Sentence? A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. A sentence must contain a subject and a predicate. An incomplete sentence is known as a sentence fragment. Two or more sentences written together are known as a run-on sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.19 (A) (vi) Relative pronouns (e.g., whose, that, which). Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pronouns
What Is a Pronoun? A pronoun is a part of speech that takes the place of a noun. The word that a pronoun stands for, or refers to, is called its antecedent. A personal pronoun refers to nouns that name people or things. When a pronoun ends in the letters -self or -selves, it is known as a reflexive or intensive pronoun. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.19 (A) (viii) Transitions for sentence to sentence or paragraph to paragraph coherence. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.19 (B) Write complex sentences and differentiate between main versus subordinate clauses. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Sentences
What is a Sentence? A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. A sentence must contain a subject and a predicate. An incomplete sentence is known as a sentence fragment. Two or more sentences written together are known as a run-on sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.19 (C) Use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex) that include properly placed modifiers, correctly identified antecedents, parallel structures, and consistent tenses. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Modifiers-Adjectives
What is an Adjective? A word that describes a noun or a pronoun is called an adjective. Modify means to change. Since adjectives change the meanings of nouns and pronouns, adjectives are also called modifiers. In the following sentence, intelligent is a predicate adjective. The word intelligent describes the word sister and follows the predicate, is: My sister is intelligent. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to the function that a particular word plays in a sentence. The eight parts of speech are: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, interjection, preposition and pronoun. Examples: Adverb-modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Conjunction-joins words or groups of words. Interjection-expresses emotions. Preposition-relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence. Pronoun-takes the place of a noun(s). Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Modifiers-Adverbs
What is an Adverb? A word that modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb is called an adverb. Modify means to change. Since adverbs change the meanings of verbs and adjectives, adverbs are also called modifiers. Adverbs answer the questions: How? When? Where? or To What Extent? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
(7.20) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
7.20 (A) Use conventions of capitalization. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Capitalization
The following categories of words should always be capitalized: The Pronoun "I", First Words of Sentences, Names and Titles of People, Family Relationships, Geographical Names, Parks, Mountains, Areas of the United States, Organizations, Teams, Companies, Schools, Awards, Religions. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Capitalization
Which Words Should Be Capitalized? In English, there are very specific rules for capitalizing words. The following categories of words should always be capitalized: Languages: French; Races: Native Americans; Nationalities: Spanish; School: Subjects Math II; Brand Names: Coca Cola; Ships: Titanic; Books: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen; Newspapers: New York Times; Magazines: Newsweek; Songs: The Star-Spangled Banner; Movies: King Kong; Abbreviations: A.M. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.20 (B) Recognize and use punctuation marks including: Readiness Standard
7.20 (B) (i) Commas after introductory words, phrases, and clauses. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.20 (B) (ii) Semicolons, colons, and hyphens. Supporting Standard (STAAR)
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
(7.21) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
7.21 (A) Spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings. Readiness Standard (STAAR)
Spelling
Are There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spelling
Are There Any Tricks to Becoming a Successful Speller? One technique for successful spelling is to say, or pronounce, the word correctly. Another technique for successful spelling is to write the word. It is helpful to refer to a dictionary for the correct spellings of questionable words. A memory device may be of use: c-a-p-i-t-o-l is the spelling for our nation’s Capitol Building; the "o" looks like the dome of the Capitol Building. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Common Core State StandardsConnecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Common Core StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNorth Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR)Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirgin Islands Common Core StandardsVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards