Maryland Standards for Fifth Grade English Language Arts

Cause and Effect
Cause and effect refers to the relationship between two events or occurrences. To put it simply, it is when one thing causes something else to happen. A cause is WHY something happens. An effect is WHAT happened as a result of something else. To find the cause, ask yourself: Why did this happen? To find the effect, ask yourself: What happened? Read more...iWorksheets: 7Study Guides: 1
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to translate a message from a code into the original language or form. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Informal Language
Informal language is mainly used between people who know each other well, or in relaxed and unofficial contexts. Informal language is mostly used while talking. we can also use informal language when we are writing such as writing a postcard to a family member or sending a text message to a friend or some business correspondences. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Prefix/Suffix/Syllables
A prefix is a group of letters placed before a root word or another prefix creating a new word. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Root Words
What are Root Words? A root is the foundation on which the meaning of the word is built. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Synonyms/Antonyms
What are Synonyms? Synonyms are words that have nearly the same meaning. What are Antonyms? Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1

MD.1.0. General Reading Processes

1.C. Students will read orally with accuracy and expression at a rate that sounds like speech.

1.C.1. Read orally at an appropriate rate
1.C.1.a. Read familiar text at a rate that is conversational and consistent
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2. Read grade-level text with both high accuracy and appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression
1.C.2.a. Apply knowledge of word structures and patterns to read with automaticity
Decoding Strategies
Analogy, word structure, syntax, and semantics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.b. Demonstrate appropriate use of phrasing
1.C.2.b.2. Use punctuation cues to guide meaning and expression
Punctuation for Comprehension
Use knowledge of punctuation to assist in comprehension. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.b.3. Use pacing and intonation to convey meaning and expression
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.b.4. Adjust intonation and pitch appropriately
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.2.c. Increase sight words read fluently
High Frequency Words I
High frequency words are words that you may come across frequently when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words I
High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
What are High Frequency Words? High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words I
High frequency words are quite simply those words which occur most frequently in written material, for example, "and", "the", "as" and "it". Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
HIGH FREQUENCY WORDS II. Words that you may see often when reading are called high frequency words. As a 6th grader, you should be familiar with how to pronounce and spell the following high frequency words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.D. Students will use a variety of strategies and opportunities to understand word meaning and to increase vocabulary.

1.D.1. Develop and apply vocabulary through exposure to a variety of texts
1.D.1.a. Acquire new vocabulary through listening to, independently reading, and discussing a variety of literary and informational texts
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.1.b. Discuss words and word meanings daily as they are encountered in text, instruction, and conversation
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.2. Develop and apply a conceptual understanding of new words
1.D.2.b. Identify and explain relationships between and among words
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.D.3. Understand, acquire, and use new vocabulary
1.D.3.a. Use context to determine the meanings of words
Context Clues
Context clues are clues found in a text that may help you figure out the definition of a word that you do not know. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
Your vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context Clues
Context cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context Clues
The five types of Context Clues are: Example Clues (group of items in a category), Synonym Clues (similar meaning is in the text), Antonym Clues (opposite meaning is in the text), Direct Definition Clues (meaning is stated in the sentence) and Appositive Clues (meaning is set off by commas). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.D.3.b. Use word structure to determine the meaning of words
Decoding Strategies
Analogy, word structure, syntax, and semantics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.3.c. Use resources to confirm definitions and gather further information about words
Dictionary/Thesaurus
Alphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.3.d. Use new vocabulary in speaking and writing to gain and extend content knowledge and clarify expression
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3

1.E. Students will use a variety of strategies to understand what they read (construct meaning).

1.E.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills through exposure to a variety of print and non-print texts, including traditional print and electronic texts
1.E.1.a. Listen to critically, read, and discuss texts representing diversity in content, culture, authorship, and perspective, including areas such as race, gender, disability, religion, and socio-economic background
Identify Perspectives
Perspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.2. Use strategies to prepare for reading (before reading)
1.E.2.a. Survey and preview the text by examining features such as the title, illustrations, photographs, charts, and graphs
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.2.c. Make predictions and ask questions about the text
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
When you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
What is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.2.d. Make connections to the text from prior knowledge and experiences
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.3. Use strategies to make meaning from text (during reading)
1.E.3.d. Skim the text to search for connections between and among ideas
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.3.e. Make, confirm, or adjust predictions
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
When you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
What is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.3.f. Periodically summarize while reading
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.j. Explain personal connections to the ideas or information in the text
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4. Use strategies to demonstrate understanding of the text (after reading)
1.E.4.a. Identify and explain the main idea
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.b. Identify and explain what is directly stated in the text
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.c. Identify and explain what is not directly stated in the text by drawing inferences
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
What are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied Information
Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.d. Draw conclusions or make generalizations about the text
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
What are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied Information
Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.e. Confirm, refute, or make predictions and form new ideas
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
When you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
What are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied Information
Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Making Predictions
What is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.E.4.f. Paraphrase the main idea
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.g. Summarize
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.h. Connect the text to prior knowledge or personal experience
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.2.0. Comprehension of Informational Text

2.A.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills by reading a variety of self-selected and assigned print and non-print informational texts, including electronic media

2.A.1.a. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of nonfiction materials such as textbooks, appropriate reference materials, research and historical documents, personal narratives, diaries, and journals, biographies, newspapers, letters, articles, web sites and other online materials, other appropriate content-specific texts to gain information and content knowledge
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.1.b. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of functional documents such as sets of directions, science investigations, atlases, posters, flyers, forms, instructional manuals, menus, pamphlets, rules, invitations, recipes, advertisements, other functional documents
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.1.c. Select and read to gain information from personal interest materials such as brochures, books, magazines, cookbooks, catalogs, and web sites
Text Features
A map is a visual representation of a section of land. A map has several features to help readers interpret information: compass, index, scale, symbols, legend. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.2. Identify and use text features to facilitate understanding of informational texts

2.A.2.a. Use print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, underlining, and other appropriate content-specific texts
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.2.b. Use graphic aids such as illustrations and pictures, photographs, drawings, sketches, cartoons, maps (key, scale, legend, graphs, charts/tables, and diagrams, other graphic aids encountered in informational texts
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.2.c. Use informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, bulleted lists, footnoted words, pronunciation key, transition words, other informational aids encountered in informational texts
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Write labels and captions for graphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Which caption is the best choice? Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of print. Employ pre-reading strategies to facilitate comprehension. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.2.d. Use organizational aids such as titles, chapter titles, headings, subheadings, tables of contents, numbered steps, glossaries, indices, transition words, other organizational aids encountered in organizational texts
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of a Book
FreeA book often has several parts that make finding information easier for readers. Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :1
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Parts of a Book
Books contain several informational and important parts, including: Table of Contents, Index and Glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Parts of a Book
Books may contain several parts that help the readers find information quickly and easily: Tables of Contents, Index, Glossary, headings, graphic organizers, charts, bold or italicized text. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.2.f. Identify and explain the contributions of text features to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

2.A.3. Develop and apply knowledge of organizational structure of informational text to understand what is read

2.A.3.a. Identify and analyze the organizational patterns of texts such as sequential and/or chronological order, cause/effect, problem/solution, similarities/differences, description, main idea and supporting details
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.3.b. Identify and use words and phrases associated with common organizational patterns such as words that show chronology (first, second, third), description (above, beneath, next to, beside), cause and effect (because, as a result), sequence (next, then, finally)
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3

2.A.4. Determine and analyze important ideas and messages in informational texts

2.A.4.a. Identify and explain the author's/text's purpose and intended audience
Author's Purpose/Point of View
An author writes for many reasons, such as to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Author's Purpose/Point of View
Author’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.c. State and support main ideas and messages
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
What are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.4.d. Summarize or paraphrase
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.e. Identify and explain information not related to the main idea
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.4.g. Draw conclusions and inferences and make generalizations and predictions from text
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Implied Information
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
An inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Making Predictions
When you make a prediction, you make a reasonable guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. You should use the hints and clues the author writes in the story in order to make an educated prediction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Inferences
What are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing Conclusions
What is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied Information
Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Making Predictions
What is a Prediction? A prediction is an educated guess about what is going to happen NEXT in the story. When making a prediction: Use hints and clues the author includes in the story. Ask yourself: Does my prediction make sense? Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.4.h. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion
Fact/Opinion/Exaggeration
Recognize fact, opinion, and exaggeration. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause/Effect, Fact/Opinion
Cause and effect refers to the relationship between two events. A cause is why something happens and an effect is what happened as a result of that cause. A fact is information that is known to be true. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Cause/Effect, Fact/Opinion
What is Cause & Effect? A cause always has an effect. There is a reason why something happens. An effect happens as a result of a cause. Something happens for a reason. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Fact/Opinion
FreeA fact is information that is known to be true; it is a certainty. A fact does not change from person to person. An opinion is a personal belief or idea. People do not always have the same beliefs or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Opinion/Exaggeration/Missing Info
Exaggeration is a representation of something in an excessive manner. It is the opposite of minimisation. Identify missing and irrelevant information. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion. Read more...iWorksheets :3

2.A.5. Identify and explain the author's use of language

2.A.5.a. Identify and explain specific words or phrases that contribute to the meaning of a text
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.5.c. Identify and explain the effect of repetition of words and phrases
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Poetic Devices
Students use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Devices
What is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Literary Elements/Poetic Devices
A literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.6. Read critically to evaluate informational text

2.A.6.b. Identify and explain additions or changes to format or text features that would make the text easier to understand
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.6.d. Explain whether or not the author's opinion is presented fairly
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.6.e. Identify and explain information not included in the text
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
Identify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Detail
A supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative Questions
Literal questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic Sentences
A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex Sentences
Identify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.3.0. Comprehension of Literary Text

3.A.1. Develop and apply comprehension skills by reading a variety of self-selected and assigned literary texts including print and non-print

3.A.1.a. Listen to critically, read, and discuss a variety of literary texts representing diverse cultures, perspectives, ethnicities, and time periods
Identify Perspectives
Perspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.1.b. Listen to critically, read, and discuss a variety of literary forms and genres
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.2. Analyze text features to facilitate understanding of literary texts

3.A.2.a. Identify and explain how organizational aids such as the title of the book, story, poem, or play, titles of chapters, subtitles, subheadings contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.2.b. Identify and explain how graphic aids such as pictures and illustrations, punctuation, print features contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.2.c. Identify and explain how informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, bulleted lists, footnoted words, pronunciation keys, transition words, end notes, works cited, other information aids encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Write labels and captions for graphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Which caption is the best choice? Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of print. Employ pre-reading strategies to facilitate comprehension. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.2.d. Identify and explain how print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, underlining, other print features encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Features
What are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

3.A.3. Analyze elements of narrative texts to facilitate understanding and interpretation

3.A.3.a. Identify and distinguish among types of narrative texts such as short stories, folklore, legends, myths, realistic fiction, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, autobiographies, personal narratives, plays, and poetry
Different Genres
Define characteristics of difference genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.3.b. Identify and explain the events of the plot
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot Features
Many genres of literature have particular plot features. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
What is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.c. Identify and describe the setting and the mood and explain how the setting affects the characters and the mood
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.d. Analyze characterization
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.e. Identify and explain relationships between and among characters, setting, and events
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot Features
Many genres of literature have particular plot features. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.3.f. Identify and explain how the actions of the character(s) affect the plot
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot Features
Many genres of literature have particular plot features. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.4. Analyze elements of poetry to facilitate understanding and interpretation

3.A.4.a. Use structural features to identify poetry as a literary form and distinguish among types of poems such as haiku, form/shape poetry, etc.
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.b. Identify and explain the meaning of words, lines, and stanzas
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Poetic Devices
Students use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Devices
What is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements/Poetic Devices
A literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.4.c. Identify and explain sound elements of poetry
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Literary Devices
Literary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her messages in a simple manner to the readers. Literary Devices are Metaphor, Simile, Hyperbole, Personification, Analogy, Euphemism, Allegory etc... Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.d. Identify and explain other poetic elements such as setting, mood, tone, etc., that contribute to meaning
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.5. Analyze elements of drama to facilitate understanding

3.A.5.a. Use structural features to identify a play as a literary form and distinguish among types of plays
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
3.A.5.b. Identify and explain the action of a scene
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Plot Features
Many genres of literature have particular plot features. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.5.c. Identify and explain how stage directions create character and movement
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.5.d. Identify and explain stage directions and dialogue that help to create character
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.6. Determine important ideas and messages in literary texts

3.A.6.b. Identify and explain similar themes across multiple texts
Main Idea
The main idea is the overall theme of a paragraph or section of a text. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.6.d. Summarize
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Summarize
When you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. When you summarize you should focus on the main ideas and important points of the text, keep your summary short. When you summarize you should not include unnecessary details from the text and include the author’s exact words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.6.e. Identify and explain personal connections to the text
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.6.f. Explain the implications of the text for the reader and/or society
Thinking Skills
Define, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Identify Perspectives
Perspective is how the characters view and process what’s happening within the story. A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.7. Identify and describe the author's use of language

3.A.7.b. Identify and explain specific words and phrases that contribute to meaning
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.7.d. Identify and explain figurative language that contributes to meaning
Interpret Text
Interpret texts from a variety of genres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Devices
Literary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her messages in a simple manner to the readers. Literary Devices are Metaphor, Simile, Hyperbole, Personification, Analogy, Euphemism, Allegory etc... Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.7.f. Identify and explain how repetition and exaggeration contribute to meaning
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Poetic Devices
Students use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Devices
What is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Opinion/Exaggeration/Missing Info
Exaggeration is a representation of something in an excessive manner. It is the opposite of minimisation. Identify missing and irrelevant information. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements/Poetic Devices
A literary element, or narrative element, or element of literature is a constituent of all works of narrative fiction—a necessary feature of verbal storytelling that can be found in any written or spoken narrative. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.8. Read critically to evaluate literary texts

3.A.8.a. Determine and explain the plausibility of the characters' actions and the plot
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot Features
Many genres of literature have particular plot features. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Elements
Setting, plot, character, rhythm and rhyme. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is Main Idea? The main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea is the subject or main topic of the text. What is Plot? The author plans out a specific sequence of events in the story from start to finish. This specific plan is known as the PLOT of the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.8.c. Identify and explain the relationship between a literary text and its historical context
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre Characteristics
A genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
3.A.8.d. Identify and explain the relationship between the structure and the purpose of the text
Author's Purpose/Point of View
An author writes for many reasons, such as to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Central Idea/Supporting Details
FreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Author's Purpose/Point of View
Author’s purpose answers the question: Why did the author write this text? An author always has a purpose for writing. Authors may write: to inform, to entertain, to persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.4.0. Writing

4.A.1. Compose texts using the prewriting and drafting strategies of effective writers and speakers

4.A.1.b. Select and use appropriate organizational structures such as narrative, chronological or sequential order, description, main idea and detail, problem/solution, question/answer, comparison and contrast, cause and effect
4.A.1.b.1. Complete an idea by providing topic, support, and concluding sentences
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting/Concluding Sentences
Supporting sentences support the main idea of the paragraph. These sentences follow a topic sentence in a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purpose for Writing
Explain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purpose for Writing
Purpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose Identification
Topic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

4.A.2. Compose oral, written, and visual presentations that express personal ideas, inform, and persuade

4.A.2.b. Describe in prose and/or poetic forms to clarify, extend, or elaborate on ideas by using vivid language such as imagery and figurative language
Purpose for Writing
Explain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for Writing
Purpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.2.c. Compose to inform using relevant support and a variety of appropriate organizational structures and signal words within a paragraph
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for Writing
Explain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purpose for Writing
Purpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
4.A.2.d. Compose to persuade using significant reasons and relevant support to agree or disagree with an idea
4.A.2.d.1. Take a position and generate convincing reasons to support it
Writing/Listening/Speaking Rules
Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.
Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for Writing
Explain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
4.A.2.f. Manage time and process when writing for a given purpose
Writing/Listening/Speaking Rules
Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.
Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Purpose for Writing
Explain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for Writing
Purpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.A.3. Compose texts using the revising and editing strategies of effective writers and speakers

4.A.3.a. Revise texts for clarity, completeness, and effectiveness
4.A.3.a.2. Clarify meaning by adding modifiers and sensory words within a sentence
4.A.3.a.3. Clarify meaning by rearranging sentences within a text
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.A.5. Assess the effectiveness of choice of details, organizational pattern, word choice, syntax, use of figurative language, and rhetorical devices in the student's own composing

4.A.5.c. Examine and use transitions showing importance and relation such as ''because,'' ''additionally,'' ''unless,'' ''although,'' and ''so''
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

4.A.7. Locate, retrieve, and use information from various sources to accomplish a purpose

4.A.7.a. Identify, evaluate, and use sources of information on a self-selected and/or given topic
Writing/Listening/Speaking Rules
Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.
Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...
iWorksheets :3
4.A.7.e. Credit sources when paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting to avoid plagiarism
Writing/Listening/Speaking Rules
Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.
Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...
iWorksheets :3

MD.5.0. Controlling Language

5.A.1. Recognize elements of grammar in personal and academic reading

Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3

5.A.2. Recognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly

5.A.2.a. Recognize the meaning, position, form, and function of words when identifying grammatical concepts such as concrete, collective, and abstract nouns; demonstrative and relative pronouns; subordinating conjunctions
Nouns
Recognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly.
Uses subject vs. object pronouns correctly (e.g., I vs. me). Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Verbs
What is a Verb? A Verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. The majority of verbs are regular and consistently use -ed and -en to form their simple past tense and past participles. Many verbs are irregular and follow no consistent pattern in creating their -ed and/or -en forms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.A.2.b. Combine sentences using appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases
Subject/Verb Agreement
Subject/verb agreement and prepositional phrases. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.A.2.c. Differentiate between a phrase and a clause and between grammatically complete sentences and non-sentences such as sentence fragments and stringy/rambling sentences
Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.A.2.d. Compose simple, compound, and complex sentences using independent and dependent clauses, transitions, and conjunctions to connect ideas
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Signal/Transitional Words
Signal words show emphasis, addition, comparison or contrast, illustration, and cause and effect. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sequencing
What is Sequence? SEQUENCE = order. A sequence of events is the order in which events occurs. If you are telling a story about an incident that took place, it is important to tell the correct sequence of events so people understand the story. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

5.B.1. Recognize examples of conventional USAge in personal and academic reading

Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3

5.B.2. Comprehend and apply standard English USAge in oral and written language

5.B.2.a. Apply appropriate subject/verb agreement such as in compound subjects and with phrases that interrupt the subject and the verb
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Subject/Verb Agreement
Subject/verb agreement and prepositional phrases. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.B.2.b. Apply consistent and appropriate use of the principal parts of regular and irregular verbs; person, number, and case of pronouns; pronoun/antecedent agreement; and degrees of comparison of modifiers
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Verbs
What is a Verb? A Verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. The majority of verbs are regular and consistently use -ed and -en to form their simple past tense and past participles. Many verbs are irregular and follow no consistent pattern in creating their -ed and/or -en forms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.B.2.c. Recognize and correct common USAge errors such as misplaced modifiers and incorrect use of verbs such as lie - lay, rise - raise, sit - set
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Subject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Verbs
What is a Verb? A Verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. The majority of verbs are regular and consistently use -ed and -en to form their simple past tense and past participles. Many verbs are irregular and follow no consistent pattern in creating their -ed and/or -en forms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

5.C.2. Apply standard English punctuation and capitalization in written language

5.C.2.b. Use apostrophes in plural possessives and nouns that end in -s
Nouns
Recognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly.
Uses subject vs. object pronouns correctly (e.g., I vs. me). Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Spelling Words
Why is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plurals
Plurals is the grammatical category in nouns, pronouns, and verbs that refers to more than one thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of Speech
A Noun is a person, place, or thing. A Verb is a word that shows action or being. An Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. A Pronoun takes the place of a noun. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, they, them, me, we, I, you, us. Subject / Verb Agreement: the subject must agree with the verb in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Spelling
There are some words that are difficult to remember how to spell: Plurals, Possessive Nouns (words that show ownership), Homophones (two or more words having the same pronunciation but different meanings, origins, or spelling). Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Grammar/Spelling
FreePlural Nouns. Plural words are words that mean MORE than one of something. Possessive Nouns. Possessive nouns show ownership. Homonyms. Homonyms are words that sound the same but have different meanings. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Parts of Speech
A part of speech refers to how a word is used in a sentence. Parts of speech include singular, plural, possessive nouns, regular and irregular verbs, and prepositions for example. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.C.2.c. Use quotation marks and commas in dialogue
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Punctuation/Capitalization
Where do COMMAS go? Commas in a series, Commas in dates, Commas in an address, Commas in a friendly letters. Where Does the APOSTROPHE go in a Contraction? Where Does a PERIOD go in an Abbreviation? Where do QUOTATION MARKS go in Written Text? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.C.2.d. Use a colon to introduce a list
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.C.2.e. Use quotation marks and commas in simple dialogue and for direct quotations
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Punctuation/Capitalization
Where do COMMAS go? Commas in a series, Commas in dates, Commas in an address, Commas in a friendly letters. Where Does the APOSTROPHE go in a Contraction? Where Does a PERIOD go in an Abbreviation? Where do QUOTATION MARKS go in Written Text? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

5.D.1. Recognize conventional spelling in and through personal and academic reading

Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.2. Apply conventional spelling in written language

5.D.2.a. Spell grade-appropriate high-frequency and content words
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.D.2.b. Spell multi-syllabic words with complex spelling patterns
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.D.2.d. Use mnemonic devices to recall frequently misspelled words
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.3. Maintain a personal list of words to use in editing original writing

Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.6.0. Listening

6.A.2. Comprehend and analyze what is heard

6.A.2.e. Determine speaker's attitude through verbal and non-verbal cues such as tone of voice, inflections, and facial expressions
Context Clues
Context clues are clues found in a text that may help you figure out the definition of a word that you do not know. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
Your vocabulary is made up words that you know how to pronounce, know the correct meaning of, and know how to use properly in a sentence. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vocabulary
What are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context Clues
Context cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context Clues
The five types of Context Clues are: Example Clues (group of items in a category), Synonym Clues (similar meaning is in the text), Antonym Clues (opposite meaning is in the text), Direct Definition Clues (meaning is stated in the sentence) and Appositive Clues (meaning is set off by commas). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

MD.7.0. Speaking

7.A.2. Make oral presentations

7.A.2.a. Speak in a variety of situations to inform and/or relate experiences, including retelling stories
Writing/Listening/Speaking Rules
Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.
Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...
iWorksheets :3
7.A.2.c. Participate in dramatic presentations
Punctuation
What is punctuation? The marks, such as full stop, comma, and brackets, used in writing to separate sentences and their elements and to clarify meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Common Core State StandardsConnecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Common Core StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNorth Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR)Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirgin Islands Common Core StandardsVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards