Mississippi College & Career Readiness Standards for High School Chemistry

Atoms and Chemical Bonding
Worksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 2
Chemical Reactions
Worksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Elements and the periodic table
Worksheets: 3Vocabulary Sets: 3
Properties and States of Matter
Worksheets: 4Vocabulary Sets: 3

MS.BIO. Biology

Cells as a System

BIO.1A. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of life and biological organization.
BIO.1A.2. Describe the tenets of cell theory and the contributions of Schwann, Hooke, Schleiden, and Virchow.
Introduction to cells
All living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
BIO.1A.3. Using specific examples, explain how cells can be organized into complex tissues, organs, and organ systems in multicellular organisms.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.1A.4. Use evidence from current scientific literature to support whether a virus is living or non-living.
Microorganisms I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :5
BIO.1B. Students will analyze the structure and function of the macromolecules that make up cells.
BIO.1B.1. Develop and use models to compare and contrast the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) in organisms.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
BIO.1C. Students will relate the diversity of organelles to a variety of specialized cellular functions.
BIO.1C.1. Develop and use models to explore how specialized structures within cells (e.g., nucleus, cytoskeleton, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplast, centrosomes, and vacuoles) interact to carry out the functions necessary for organism survival.
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BIO.1C.2. Investigate to compare and contrast prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells, and plant, animal, and fungal cells.
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BIO.1C.3. Contrast the structure of viruses with that of cells, and explain why viruses must use living cells to reproduce.
Microorganisms I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :5
BIO.1D. Students will describe the structure of the cell membrane and analyze how the structure is related to its primary function of regulating transport in and out of cells to maintain homeostasis.
BIO.1D.1. Plan and conduct investigations to prove that the cell membrane is a semi-permeable, allowing it to maintain homeostasis with its environment through active and passive transport processes.
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.1D.2. Develop and use models to explain how the cell deals with imbalances of solute concentration across the cell membrane (i.e., hypertonic, hypotonic, and isotonic conditions, sodium/potassium pump).
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.1E. Students will develop and use models to explain the role of the cell cycle during growth, development, and maintenance in multicellular organisms.
BIO.1E.1. Construct models to explain how the processes of cell division and cell differentiation produce and maintain complex multicellular organisms.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
BIO.1E.3. Relate the processes of cellular reproduction to asexual reproduction in simple organisms (i.e., budding, vegetative propagation, regeneration, binary fission). Explain why the DNA of the daughter cells is the same as the parent cell.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4

Energy Transfer

BIO.2. Students will explain that cells transform energy through the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration to drive cellular functions.
BIO.2.2. Develop models of the major reactants and products of photosynthesis to demonstrate the transformation of light energy into stored chemical energy in cells. Emphasize the chemical processes in which bonds are broken and energy is released, and new bonds are formed and energy is stored.
Photosynthesis and respiration
Photosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BIO.2.3. Develop models of the major reactants and products of cellular respiration (aerobic and anaerobic) to demonstrate the transformation of the chemical energy stored in food to the available energy of ATP. Emphasize the chemical processes in which bonds are broken and energy is released, and new bonds are formed and energy is stored.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.2.4. Conduct scientific investigations or computer simulations to compare aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration in plants and animals, using real world examples.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.2.5. Enrichment: Investigate variables (e.g., nutrient availability, temperature) that affect anaerobic respiration and current real-world applications of fermentation.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
BIO.2.6. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to manipulate factors involved in fermentation to optimize energy production.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Reproduction and Heredity

BIO.3A. Students will develop and use models to explain the role of meiosis in the production of haploid gametes required for sexual reproduction.
BIO.3A.1. Model sex cell formation (meiosis) and combination (fertilization) to demonstrate the maintenance of chromosome number through each generation in sexually reproducing populations. Explain why the DNA of the daughter cells is different from the DNA of the parent cell.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
BIO.3A.2. Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in terms of reproduction.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
BIO.3A.3. Investigate chromosomal abnormalities (e.g., Down syndrome, Turner’s syndrome, and Klinefelter syndrome) that might arise from errors in meiosis (nondisjunction) and how these abnormalities are identified (karyotypes).
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
BIO.3B. Students will analyze and interpret data collected from probability calculations to explain the variation of expressed traits within a population.
BIO.3B.1. Demonstrate Mendel’s law of dominance and segregation using mathematics to predict phenotypic and genotypic ratios by constructing Punnett squares with both homozygous and heterozygous allele pairs.
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
BIO.3B.4. Analyze and interpret data (e.g., pedigrees, family, and population studies) regarding Mendelian and complex genetic traits (e.g., sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, color-blindness, and hemophilia) to determine patterns of inheritance and disease risk.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
BIO.3C. Students will construct an explanation based on evidence to describe how the structure and nucleotide base sequence of DNA determines the structure of proteins or RNA that carry out essential functions of life.
BIO.3C.1. Develop and use models to explain the relationship between DNA, genes, and chromosomes in coding the instructions for the traits transferred from parent to offspring.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
BIO.3C.2. Evaluate the mechanisms of transcription and translation in protein synthesis.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
BIO.3C.3. Use models to predict how various changes in the nucleotide sequence (e.g., point mutations, deletions, and additions) will affect the resulting protein product and the subsequent inherited trait.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
BIO.3C.4. Research and identify how DNA technology benefits society. Engage in scientific argument from evidence over the ethical issues surrounding the use of DNA technology (e.g., cloning, transgenic organisms, stem cell research, and the Human Genome Project, gel electrophoresis).
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Adaptations and Evolution

BIO.4. Students will analyze and interpret evidence to explain the unity and diversity of life.
BIO.4.4. Design models and use simulations to investigate the interaction between changing environments and genetic variation in natural selection leading to adaptations in populations and differential success of populations.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
BIO.4.5. Use Darwin's Theory to explain how genetic variation, competition, overproduction, and unequal reproductive success acts as driving forces of natural selection and evolution.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

Interdependence of Organisms and Their Environments

BIO.5. Students will Investigate and evaluate the interdependence of living organisms and their environment.
BIO.5.1. Illustrate levels of ecological hierarchy, including organism, population, community, ecosystem, biome, and biosphere.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BIO.5.2. Analyze models of the cycling of matter (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water) between abiotic and biotic factors in an ecosystem and evaluate the ability of these cycles to maintain the health and sustainability of the ecosystem.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BIO.5.3. Analyze and interpret quantitative data to construct an explanation for the effects of greenhouse gases on the carbon dioxide cycle and global climate.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BIO.5.4. Develop and use models to describe the flow of energy and amount of biomass through food chains, food webs, and food pyramids.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BIO.5.5. Evaluate symbiotic relationships (e.g., mutualism, parasitism, and commensalism) and other co-evolutionary (e.g., predator-prey, cooperation, competition, and mimicry) relationships within specific environments.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
BIO.5.8. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to create a solution that addresses changing ecological conditions (e.g., climate change, invasive species, loss of biodiversity, human population growth, habitat destruction, biomagnification, or natural phenomena).
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.BOT. Botany

Plant Morphology, Cell Structure, and Function

BOT.1. Students will investigate the morphology, anatomy, and physiology of plants.
BOT.1.1. Analyze models (3-D, paper, and/or computer-based) to distinguish the basic morphology of the plant kingdom, with attention to structures and their related functions. Use cladograms or phylogenetic trees to identify evolutionary features that distinguish the plant kingdom from other kingdoms.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.1.2. Using microscopes, observe, identify, record, and analyze (e.g., see and draw) cells and cell structures unique to plants. Use data measurements obtained from microscopy to compare the plant cells and organelle sizes between various examples (e.g., elodea, onion, or algae).
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.1.3. Describe the relationship between the structure and purpose of plant organs (e.g., roots, stems, and leaves).
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.1.4. Evaluate and explain how bacteria and fungi work symbiotically to enhance plant root function.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BOT.1.5. Calculate surface area of leaves/roots, and compare surface areas of various plant specimens to explain adaptations of the various plant types.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.1.6. Demonstrate through model development and manipulation an understanding of plant biochemistry.
Photosynthesis and respiration
Photosynthesis may be thought of as a chemical reaction in which carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil plus solar energy combine to produce carbohydrate and oxygen. What is similarity between human skeletal muscles and some bacteria? Match each Photosynthesis ad respiration term to its definition like Glucose, Chloroplast, Organelle, Guard Cells and many more. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.1.9. Communicate the importance of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and nitrogen cycles to plant physiology through graphics such as poster or computer presentations.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
BOT.1.10. Identify and compare various live plant examples to explore plant morphological diversity, including leaf number, structure, and arrangement; root modifications; and flower structure and arrangement. Produce a visual product (e.g., an electronic presentation) to identify and communicate patterns of similarity and differences between the lab specimens.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.1.11. Compare and contrast functions of the various characteristics found in plant divisions and utilize dichotomous keys to identify plant species.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5

Plant Evolution

BOT.2. Students will identify evolutionary modifications necessary for the terrestrial survival of plants.
BOT.2.2. Referencing the USDA plants database, identify, compare, and contrast seedless, naked seed, and enclosed-seed modifications for reproduction. Calculate the occurrence of seed types in given habitats.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.2.3. Summarize and justify the characteristics of angiosperms and gymnosperms that lead to their success as terrestrial plants.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
BOT.2.4. Research information to develop, produce, and communicate a scientifically justifiable argument for the rapid amplification and success of angiosperm compared to other plant divisions.
Introduction to plants
Which woody plant structure possesses vascular tissue lenticels? From which part of the seed will the leaves and upper portions of the stem of a plant develop? Match each plants term to its definition like Lactic acid fermentation, ovule, gymnosperm, guard cells, phloem, vascular tissue, root cap. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5

Plant Reproduction

BOT.3. Students will characterize the reproductive strategies of plants.
BOT.3.1. Describe the various processes of asexual reproduction and vegetative propagation used by plants. Communicate the importance of these reproductive methods in regard to human food production.
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.3.3. Compare and contrast the consequences of the following reproductive methods: asexual reproduction, vegetative propagation, and sexual reproduction.
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.3.4. Plan and conduct comparative flower dissection to identify reproductive structures within the flower.
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.3.5. Compare the similarities between corresponding plant reproductive structures from a variety of species. Record via drawings of observed dissection specimens, and explain the similarities and differences observed.
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.3.6. Identify differences in flower structure and shape. Provide a rationale that explains the value of these differences in flower structure to reproductive success (e.g., pollinators, flower shape, smell, color, size, orientation).
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
BOT.3.8. Using laboratory data, correctly categorize fruits, vegetables, nuts, modified stems, or other plant parts. Compare the scientific definitions of these terms to those used by the general public/society and the USDA to categorize food.
Plant structure and function
Plants are living organisms made up of cells. Plants need sunlight and water to live and grow healthy. Many plants, but not all plants, produce flowers, which make fruit and seeds in order for the plant to reproduce. There are two different types of root systems: A fibrous root system has many roots that grow in many different directions. Plants that have a taproot system have only one large main root growing from the plant’s stem. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2

MS.CHE. Chemistry

Mathematical and Computational Analysis

CHE.1. Students will use mathematical and computational analysis to evaluate problems.
CHE.1.1. Use dimensional analysis (factor/label) and significant figures to convert units and solve problems.
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
CHE.1.2. Design and conduct experiments using appropriate measurements, significant figures, graphical analysis to analyze data.
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4

Atomic Theory

CHE.2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the atomic structure and the historical developments leading to modern atomic theory.
CHE.2.2. Construct models (e.g., ball and stick, online simulations, mathematical computations) of atomic nuclei to explain the abundance weighted average (relative mass) of elements and isotopes on the published mass of elements.
Nuclear Chemistry
Worksheets :3
Atomic and Nuclear Physics
FreeWorksheets :4

Periodic Table

CHE.3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements.
CHE.3.1. Explore and communicate the organization of the periodic table, including history, groups, families, family names, metals, nonmetals, metalloids, and transition metals.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3
CHE.3.2. Analyze properties of atoms and ions (e.g., metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic/ionic radii) using periodic trends of elements based on the periodic table.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3

Bonding

CHE.4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the types of bonds and resulting atomic structures for the classification of chemical compounds.
CHE.4.1. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-stick, 3-D printing, or simulation programs such as PhET) to predict the type of bonding between atoms and the shape of simple compounds.
CHE.4.4. Use models and oxidation numbers to predict the type of bond, shape of the compound, and the polarity of the compound.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3

Naming Compounds

CHE.5. Students will investigate and understand the accepted nomenclature used to identify the name and chemical formulas of compounds.
CHE.5.1. Use the periodic table and a list of common polyatomic ions as a model to derive chemical compound formulas from compound names and compound names from chemical formulas.
CHE.5.2. Generate formulas of ionic and covalent compounds from compound names. Discuss compounds in everyday life and compile lists and uses of these chemicals.
CHE.5.3. Generate names of ionic and covalent compounds from their formulas. Name binary compounds, binary acids, stock compounds, ternary compounds, and ternary acids.

Chemical Reactions

CHE.6. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the types, causes, and effects of chemical reactions.
CHE.6.1. Develop and use models to predict the products of chemical reactions (e.g., synthesis reactions; single replacement; double displacement; and decomposition, including exceptions such as decomposition of hydroxides, chlorates, carbonates, and acids). Discuss and/or compile lists of reactions used in everyday life.
CHE.6.2. Plan, conduct, and communicate the results of investigations to demonstrate different types of simple chemical reactions.

Gas Laws

CHE.7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and behavior of gases.
CHE.7.1. Analyze the behavior of ideal and real gases in terms of pressure, volume, temperature, and number of particles.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
CHE.7.2. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to develop models (e.g., online simulations or student interactive activities) to explain and predict the behavior of each state of matter using the movement of particles and intermolecular forces to explain the behavior of matter.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
CHE.7.4. Use mathematical computations to describe the relationships comparing pressure, temperature, volume, and number of particles, including Boyle’s law, Charles’s law, Dalton’s law, combined gas laws, and ideal gas laws.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
CHE.7.5. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process and online simulations or lab investigations to design and model the results of controlled scientific investigations to produce mathematical evidence that confirms the gas-laws relationships.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
CHE.7.6. Use the ideal gas law to support the prediction of volume, mass, and number of particles produced in chemical reactions (i.e., gas stoichiometry).
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
CHE.7.7. Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to produce mathematical evidence that confirms that reactions involving gases conform to the law of conservation of mass.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
CHE.7.8. Enrichment: Using gas stoichiometry, calculate the volume of carbon dioxide needed to inflate a balloon to occupy a specific volume. Use an engineering design process to design, construct, evaluate, and improve a simulated air bag.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3

Solutions

CHE.8. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of properties of various types of chemical solutions.
CHE.8.1. Use mathematical and computational analysis to quantitatively express the concentration of solutions using the concepts such as molarity, percent by mass, and dilution.
The Mole
Worksheets :3
CHE.8.2. Develop and use models (e.g., online simulations, games, or video representations) to explain the dissolving process in solvents on the molecular level.
Solutions
Worksheets :3
CHE.8.6. Design, conduct, and communicate the results of experiments to produce a specified volume of a solution of a specific molarity, and dilute a solution of a known molarity.
The Mole
Worksheets :3

Acids and Bases (Enrichment)

CHE.9. Enrichment: Students will understand the nature and properties of acids, bases, and salt solutions.
CHE.9.1. Enrichment: Analyze and interpret data to describe the properties of acids, bases, and salts.
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1
CHE.9.4. Enrichment: Analyze and evaluate the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis acid-base definitions.
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1

Thermochemistry (Enrichment)

CHE.10. Enrichment: Students will understand that energy is exchanged or transformed in all chemical reactions.
CHE.10.1. Enrichment: Construct explanations to explain how temperature and heat flow in terms of the motion of molecules (or atoms).
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
CHE.10.2. Enrichment: Classify chemical reactions and phase changes as exothermic or endothermic based on enthalpy values. Use a graphical representation to illustrate the energy changes involved.
CHE.10.3. Enrichment: Analyze and interpret data from energy diagrams and investigations to support claims that the amount of energy released or absorbed during a chemical reaction depends on changes in total bond energy.
CHE.10.4. Enrichment: Use mathematical and computational thinking to solve problems involving heat flow and temperature changes, using known values of specific heat and latent heat of phase change.
Heat
Worksheets :3

Equilibrium (Enrichment)

CHE.11. Enrichment: Students will understand that chemical equilibrium is a dynamic process at the molecular level.
CHE.11.2. Enrichment: Predict when equilibrium is established in a chemical reaction.

Organic Nomenclature (Enrichment)

CHE.12. Enrichment: Students will understand that the bonding characteristics of carbon allow the formation of many different organic molecules with various sizes, shapes, and chemical properties.
CHE.12.1. Enrichment: Construct explanations to explain the bonding characteristics of carbon that result in the formation of basic organic molecules.
Organic Chemistry
Worksheets :3

MS.ESS. Earth and Space Science

Earth in the Universe

ESS.1A. Students will develop an understanding of the universe, its development, immense size, and composition.
ESS.1A.1. Describe the Big Bang theory and summarize observations (e.g., cosmic microwave background radiation, Hubble’s law, and redshift caused by the Doppler effect) as evidence to support the formation and expansion of the universe.
ESS.1A.2. Interpret information from the Hertzsprung -Russell diagram to differentiate types of stars, including our sun, according to size, magnitude, and classification.
ESS.1A.3. Organize and interpret data sets for patterns and trends to compare and contrast stellar evolution in order to explain and communicate how a star changes during its life.
ESS.1B. Students will develop an understanding of Earth, the solar system, and the laws that predict the motion of celestial bodies.
ESS.1B.1. Read and evaluate scientific information for mechanisms/results (e.g., the solar nebular theory) to explain how the solar system was formed. Cite evidence and develop a logical argument.
ESS.1B.2. Compare and contrast celestial bodies (e.g., planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and the Oort cloud) and their motion in our solar system (e.g., revolution and rotation). Build an Analemma calendar.
ESS.1B.3. Design a model (e.g., a gravity simulation using PVC and a neoprene screen) to demonstrate Kepler’s laws and the relationships of the orbits of objects in our solar system. Relate them to Newton’s law of universal gravitation and laws of motion.

Earth Structure and History

ESS.2A. Students will develop an understanding of the structure and composition of Earth and its materials.
ESS.2A.2. Analyze and interpret data to explain and communicate the differentiation of Earth’s physical divisions (e.g., lithosphere and asthenosphere) using data from seismic waves and Earth’s magnetic field.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2A.3. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of mineral specimens to identify minerals and mineral deposits/groups (e.g., oxides, carbonates, halides, sulfides, sulfates, silicates, and phosphates). Include the relationship between chemical bonds, chemical formulas, mineral use, and mineral properties.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ESS.2A.4. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of rock specimens to identify and categorize igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Include the processes that generate the transformation of rocks.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2B. Students will develop an understanding of the history and evolution of the earth.
ESS.2B.1. Research, analyze, and evaluate the contributions of William Smith, James Hutton, Nicolaus Steno, Charles Lyell, and others to physical geology.
ESS.2B.2. Apply different techniques (e.g., superposition, original horizontality, cross-cutting relationships, lateral continuity, principle of inclusions, fossil succession, and unconformities) to analyze and interpret the relative age of actual sequences, models, or photographs.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.3. Use mathematical concepts to calculate the absolute age of earth materials using actual or simulated isotope ratios.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.4. Research, analyze, and explain the origin of geologic features and processes that result from plate tectonics, including sea floor spreading, earthquake activity, volcanic activity, mountain building, and location of natural resources.
ESS.2B.5. Use mathematical representations to interpret seismic graphs to triangulate the location of an earthquake’s epicenter and magnitude and to correlate the frequency and magnitude of an earthquake.
ESS.2B.6. Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to determine how factors (e.g., wind velocity, water velocity, ice, and temperature) may affect the rate of weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Earth’s Systems and Cycles

ESS.3. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s systems and cycles.
ESS.3.1. Use mathematical representations (e.g., latitude, longitude, and maps) to calculate the angle of noon solar incidence and relate the value to day length, distribution of sunlight, and seasonal change.
ESS.3.3. Explain how temperature and density of ocean water influence circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.4. Research and communicate information to explain the importance of the transfer of thermal energy among the hydrosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere. Include the unique physical and chemical properties of water, the water cycle, and energy transfer within the rock cycle.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.5. Analyze and interpret weather data using maps and global weather systems to explain and communicate the relationships among air masses, pressure systems, and frontal boundaries.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.6. Construct an explanation from data sets to obtain and evaluate scientific information to construct scientific arguments on changes in climate caused by various natural factors (e.g., plate tectonics and continent location and Milankovitch cycles) versus anthropogenic factors (e.g., fossil fuel use and agricultural factors).
ESS.3.7. Cite evidence and develop logical arguments to identify the cause and effect relationships of the evolutionary milestones (e.g., photosynthesis and the atmosphere, the evolution of multicellular animals, the development of shells, and the colonization of terrestrial environments by plants and animals) that most profoundly shaped Earth’s systems.
ESS.3.8. Analyze and interpret the record of shared ancestry, evolution, and extinction as related to natural selection using fossils.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Earth’s Resources and Human Activity

ESS.4. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s resources and the impact of human activities.
ESS.4.1. Research, evaluate, and communicate about how human life on Earth shapes Earth’s systems and responds to the interaction of Earth’s systems (e.g., geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Examine how geochemical and ecological processes interact through time to cycle matter and energy and how human activity alters the rates of these processes.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.2. Research, assess, and communicate how Earth’s systems influence the distribution of life, including how various natural hazards and geologic events (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides, tornadoes, and hurricanes) have shaped the course of human history.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.3. Analyze earthquake and volcanic data to determine patterns that can lead to predicting such hazards and mitigating impact to humans.

MS.ENV. Environmental Science

Biosphere and Biodiversity

ENV.1. Students will investigate the interdependence of diverse living organisms and their interactions with the components of the biosphere.
ENV.1.3. Use models to explain why the flow of energy through an ecosystem can be illustrated by a pyramid with less energy available at the higher trophic levels compared to lower levels.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
ENV.1.4. Describe symbiotic relationships (e.g., mutualism, parasitism, and commensalism) and other co-evolutionary (e.g., predator-prey, cooperation, competition, and mimicry) relationships within specific environments.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ENV.1.5. Develop and use models to diagram the flow of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus through the environment.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2

Natural Resources Use and Conservation

ENV.2. Students will relate the impact of human activities on the environment, conservation activities, and efforts to maintain and restore ecosystems.
ENV.2.5. Research various resources related to water quality and pollution (e.g., nonfictional text, EPA’s Surf Your Watershed, MDEQ publications) and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Human Activities and Climate Change

ENV.3. Students will discuss the direct and indirect impacts of certain types of human activities on the Earth’s climate.
ENV.3.1. Use a model to describe cycling of carbon through the ocean, atmosphere, soil, and biosphere and how increases in carbon dioxide concentrations have resulted in atmospheric and climate changes.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
ENV.3.2. Interpret data and climate models to predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation, temperature, impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).

Human Sustainability

ENV.4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of human sustainability and the environment.
ENV.4.1. Identify human impact and develop a solution for protection of the atmosphere, considering pollutants (e.g., acid rain, air pollution, smog, ozone layer, or increased levels of greenhouse gases) and the impacts of pollutants on human health (e.g., asthma, COPD, emphysema, and cancer).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.2. Evaluate data and other information to explain how key natural resources (e.g., water sources, fertile soils, concentrations of minerals, and fossil fuels), natural hazards, and climate changes influence human activity (e.g., mass migrations, human health).
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.4. Enrichment: Explore online resources related to air pollution to determine air quality in a geographic area and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.FB. Foundations of Biology

History of Biology and Impacts on Society

FB.1. Students will relate the importance of significant historical biological experiments and their impact of these on research, development, and society.
FB.1.1. Identify and communicate the contributions of famous scientists and their experiments that formed fundamental scientific principles (e.g., Robert Hooke, Schleiden/ Schwann/Virchow, Griffith, Avery/MacLeod/McCarty, Hershey/Chase, Rosalind Franklin, Gregor Mendel, Watson/Crick, Pasteur, and Charles Darwin).
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
FB.1.2. Trace and model the historical development of scientific ideas and theories (e.g., creation of the microscope, discovery of cells/cell theory, discovery of DNA/RNA, double helical shape of DNA, evolution/natural selection, endosymbiosis) through the development of a timeline.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
FB.1.3. Research, analyze, explain, and communicate how scientific enterprise relates to society and classic inventions (e.g., microscope, blood typing, gel electrophoresis equipment, DNA sequencing technology).
Introduction to cells
All living things are made from one or more cells. The nucleus is the control center of the cell. It houses the nucleolus and genetic material (chromatin) used for directing cell functions. Nuclear pores allow materials to pass in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear envelope is a membrane which surrounds and protects the nucleus. The nucleolus produces ribosomes. Ribosomes are factories that produce proteins needed by the cell. Lysosomes contain chemicals (enzymes) that break down and recycle harmful materials. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :4
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

The Chemistry of Life

FB.2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and interactions of matter and how the organization of matter supports living organisms.
FB.2.1. Develop and use simple atomic models to describe the components of elements (e.g., relative position, charges of protons, neutrons, and electrons).
FB.2.2. Obtain and use information about elements (e.g., chemical symbol, atomic number, atomic mass, and group or family) to describe the organization of the periodic table.
FB.2.3. Relate chemical reactivity to an element’s position on the periodic table. Use this information to determine what type of bond will form between elements (ionic, covalent, hydrogen).
FB.2.4. Analyze and interpret data to classify common solutions as acids, bases, or neutral. Communicate the importance of pH in living systems.
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1

Organization and Energy in Living Systems

FB.3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the structure of living organisms supports the essential functions of life.
FB.3.1. Compare and contrast prokaryotic/eukaryotic and plant/animal/bacteria cells.
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
FB.3.2. Use models to investigate and explain structures within living cells that support life (e.g., cytoplasm, cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes, Golgi, vacuoles, ER, ribosomes, chromosomes, centrioles, cytoskeleton, nucleolus, nuclear membrane).
Cell structure and function
Match each Cell structure term to its definition like DNA, Lysosomes, Mitochondrion, Lipids, Endoplasmic reticulum, Osmosis and many more. What are the organelles that provide the energy to sperm cells? What hemoglobin, insulin, albumin and maltase are composed of? These animal and plant cell worksheets recommended for students of High School Biology. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :5
FB.3.3. Compare and contrast active and passive cellular transport. Analyze the movement of water across a cell membrane in hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions.
Cell processes
FreeCellular metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Living organisms are unique in that they can extract energy from their environments and use it to carry out activities such as growth, development, and reproduction. Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :7
FB.3.4. Analyze the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration and explain that relationship in terms of the need for all living things to acquire energy from their environment.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
FB.3.6. Compare and contrast the processes and results of mitosis and meiosis.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
FB.3.7. Enrichment: Research and orally communicate the possible outcomes of a failure of mitosis (cancer) or meiosis (nondisjunction).
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Molecular Basis of Heredity

FB.4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how genetic information is transferred from parent to offspring.
FB.4.1. Compare and contrast the basic structure and function of nucleic acids (e.g., DNA, RNA).
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
FB.4.2. Obtain and communicate information illustrating the relationships among DNA, genes, chromosomes, and proteins to the basis of life.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
FB.4.3. Use models (e.g., Punnett squares) and mathematical reasoning to describe and predict patterns of inheritance of single genetic traits from parents to offspring (e.g., dominant, and recessive traits, incomplete dominance, codominance, multiple alleles, sex-linkage).
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7
FB.4.4. Obtain and communicate information to describe how mutations may affect genetic expression and provide examples.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
FB.4.5. Research and report genetic technologies that may improve the quality of life (e.g., genetic engineering, cloning, gene splicing, DNA testing).
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Biological Evolution

FB.5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Earth’s fossil record and its indication of the diversity of life over time.
FB.5.1. Investigate through research the contributions of scientists to the theory of evolution and evolutionary processes (e.g., Needham, Spallanzani, Redi, Pasteur, Lyell, Lamarck, Malthus, Wallace, Darwin).
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
FB.5.2. Analyze and interpret data to support claims that different types of fossils provide evidence of the diversity of life that has existed on Earth and of the relationships between past and existing life on Earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
FB.5.4. Investigate how biological adaptations and genetic variations of traits in a population enhance the probability of survival in an environment (natural selection).
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

Ecological Principals

FB.6. Students will understand the interdependence of living organisms and their environment.
FB.6.2. Use models to analyze the cycling of matter in an ecosystem (e.g., water, carbon dioxide/oxygen, nitrogen).
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
FB.6.3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain relationships that exist between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem. Explain how changes in biotic and abiotic components affect the balance of an ecosystem over time.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
FB.6.4. Develop and use models to discuss the climate, flora, and fauna of the terrestrial and aquatic biomes of the world.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
FB.6.5. Use models to analyze the flow of energy through food chains, webs, and pyramids.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
FB.6.6. Engage in scientific argument from evidence to distinguish organisms that exist in symbiotic (mutualism, parasitism, commensalism) or co-evolutionary (predator-prey, cooperation, competition, and mimicry) relationships within ecosystems.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
FB.6.7. Enrichment: Design solutions to reduce the impact of human activity on the ecosystem.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.FSL. Foundations of Science Literacy

Nature of Science

FSL.3A. Students will apply science and engineering practices and skills to scientific investigations.
FSL.3A.2. Analyze data from simple experiments and construct organized models (e.g., data tables, graphs) detailing results from the experiments.
FSL.3A.3. Demonstrate the proper use of safety procedures and scientific laboratory equipment. Select and use appropriate tools and instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data.
The science of biology
The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Lab investigations/scientific method
Worksheets :3
The Science of Chemistry
Worksheets :3
Lab Investigations/Scientific Method
Worksheets :3
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
FSL.3A.4. Use mathematical and computational thinking to (1) use and manipulate appropriate metric units, (2) express relationships between variables for investigations, and (3) compare or combine data from two or more simple data presentations (e.g., order or sum data from a table, categorize data from a table using a scale from another table).
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
FSL.3B. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze and interpret data found in various graphics including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3B.3. Translate information into a table, graph, or diagram. Determine patterns, trends, and relationships as the values of variables change.
FSL.3B.4. Perform a simple interpolation or simple extrapolation using data in a table or graph. Determine and/or use a simple (e.g., linear) mathematical relationship that exists between data.
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
FSL.3C. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze scientific investigations found in various experimental designs including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3C.1. Analyze the methods and choice of tools used in simple and complex experimental designs.
The science of biology
The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Science of Chemistry
Worksheets :3
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3

MS.GEN. Genetics

Structure and Function of DNA

GEN.1A. Students will demonstrate that all cells contain genetic material in the form of DNA.
GEN.1A.1. Model the biochemical structure, either 3-D or computer-based, of DNA based on the experimental evidence available to Watson and Crick (Chargaff, 1950; Franklin, 1951).
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.1A.2. Explain the importance of the historical experiments that determined that DNA is the heritable material of the cell (Griffith, 1928; Avery, McCarty & MacLeod, 1944; Hershey & Chase, 1952).
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.1A.3. Relate the structure of DNA to its specific functions within the cell.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.1A.4. Conduct a standard DNA extraction protocol using salt, detergent, and ethanol from various cell types (e.g., plant, animal, fungus). Compare and contrast the consistency and quantity of DNA extracted from various cell types.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.1A.5. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to refine the methodology to optimize the DNA-extraction process for various cell types.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.1B. Students will analyze how the DNA sequence is copied and transmitted to new cells.
GEN.1B.1. Compare and contrast various proposed models of DNA replication (i.e., conservative, semi-conservative, and disruptive). Evaluate the evidence used to determine the mechanism of DNA replication.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.1B.2. Develop and use models to illustrate the mechanics of DNA replication.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.1B.3. Microscopically observe and analyze the stages of the cell cycle (G1-S-G2-M) to describe the phenomenon, and identify methods at different cell cycle checkpoints through which the integrity of the DNA code is maintained.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4

Transcription, Translation, and Mutations

GEN.2A. Students will analyze and explain the processes of transcription and translation in protein production.
GEN.2A.1. Compare and contrast the structure of RNA to DNA and relate this structure to the different function of each molecule.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.2A.2. Describe and model how the process of transcription produces RNA from a DNA template in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2A.3. Develop a model to show the relationship between the components involved in the mechanics of translation at the ribosome.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2A.4. Analyze the multiple roles of RNA in translation. Compare the structure and function of tRNA, rRNA, mRNA, and snRNA.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2A.5. Enrichment: Evaluate Beadle and Tatum’s “One Gene-One Enzyme Hypothesis” (1941) in the development of the central dogma (DNA →RNA →Protein). Explain how new discoveries, such as alternate splicing of introns, have led to the revision of the central dogma.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2B. Students will determine the causes and effects of mutations in DNA.
GEN.2B.1. Identify factors that cause mutations (e.g., environmental, errors in replication, and viral infections).
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2B.2. Explain how these mutations may result in changes in protein structure and function.
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2B.3. Describe cellular mechanisms that can help to minimize mutations (e.g., cell cycle checkpoints, DNA polymerase proofreading, and DNA repair enzymes).
Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
The term nucleic acid is the name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides. DNA molecules are double-stranded and RNA molecules are single-stranded. To initiate the process of information transfer, one strand of the double-stranded DNA chain serves as a template for the synthesis of a single strand of RNA that is complementary to the DNA strand. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.2B.5. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to research the current status of genetic technology and personalized medicine, then propose and test targeted medical or forensic applications.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Biotechnological Applications

GEN.3. Students will investigate biotechnology applications and bioengineering practices.
GEN.3.1. Explain and demonstrate the use of various tools and techniques of DNA manipulation and their applications in forensics (e.g., paternity and victim/suspect identification), agriculture (e.g., pesticide or herbicide resistance, improved yields, and improved nutritional value), and personalized medicine (e.g., targeted therapies, cancer treatment, production of insulin and human growth hormone, and engineering insect vectors of human parasites).
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.3.2. Experimentally demonstrate genetic transformation, protein purification, and/or gel electrophoresis.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.3.3. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to refine methodology and optimize the process of genetic transformation, protein purification, and/or gel electrophoresis.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3
GEN.3.4. Enrichment: Develop logical arguments based on scientific evidence for and against ethical concerns regarding biotechnology/bioengineering.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Classic Mendelian Genetics

GEN.4. Students will analyze and interpret data collected from probability calculations to explain the inheritance of traits within a population.
GEN.4.1. Demonstrate Mendel’s law of dominance and segregation using mathematics to predict phenotypic and genotypic ratios.
Genetics and heredity I
How many chromosomes would normally be contained in a gamete? Match each Genetics and heredity term to its definition like Genetic code, Crossing-over, Fertilization, Codon, Dominant allele, Ribosomes, Sex cells, Punnett square, Prophase II. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :7

Population Genetics

GEN.5. Students will apply population genetic concepts to explain variability of organisms within a population.
GEN.5.1. Model the inheritance of chromosomes through meiotic cell division and demonstrate how meiosis and sexual reproduction lead to genetic variation in populations.
Cell Reproduction
The process where one cell forms two identical daughter cells. Mitosis is how somatic—or non-reproductive cells—divide. Meiosis is cell division that creates sex cells, like female egg cells or male sperm cells. Meiosis has two cycles of cell division, called Meiosis I and Meiosis II. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GEN.5.2. Explain how natural selection acts upon genetic variability within a population and may lead to changes in allelic frequencies over time and evolutionary changes in populations.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GEN.5.5. Enrichment: Analyze computer simulations of the effects of natural selection on allelic frequencies in a population.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GEN.5.7. Enrichment: Use genomic databases for sequence analysis and apply the information to species comparisons, evolutionary relationships, and/or determine the molecular basis of inherited disorders.
DNA technology/genetic engineering
This topic is about biology and Forensic science. Students will learn to identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. They will also learn to describe the importance of generic information to forensics. Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.HAP. Human Anatomy and Physiology

Physiological Functions/Anatomical Structure

HAP.1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how anatomical structures and physiological functions are organized and described using anatomical position.
HAP.1.3. Investigate the interdependence of the various body systems to each other and to the body as a whole.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Cells and Tissues

HAP.2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of cells and tissues that form complex structures of the body.
HAP.2.1. Analyze the characteristics of the four main tissue types: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous. Examine tissues using microscopes and other various technologies.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.2.2. Construct a model to demonstrate how the structural organization of cells in a tissue relates to the specialized function of that tissue.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Skeletal System

HAP.4. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the skeletal system including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.4.1. Use models to compare the structure and function of the skeletal system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.4.2. Develop and use models to identify and classify major bones as part of the appendicular or axial skeleton.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.4.5. Construct explanations detailing how mechanisms (e.g., Ca^2+ regulation) are used by the skeletal system to maintain homeostasis.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.4.7. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to develop, model, and test effective treatments for bone disorders (i.e., prosthetics).
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Muscular System

HAP.5. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the muscular system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.5.1. Develop and use models to illustrate muscle structure, muscle locations and groups, actions, origins, and insertions.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.5.4. Use models to locate the major muscles and investigate the movements controlled by each muscle.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.5.5. Compare and contrast the anatomy and physiology of the three types of muscle tissue.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.5.6. Use technology to plan and conduct an investigation that demonstrates the physiology of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue, or muscle tone. Collect and analyze data to interpret results, then explain and communicate conclusions.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Nervous System

HAP.6. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the nervous system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.6.1. Describe and evaluate how the nervous system functions and interconnects with all other body systems.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Endocrine System

HAP.7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major organs of the endocrine system and the associated hormonal production and regulation.
HAP.7.1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to illustrate that the endocrine glands secrete hormones that help the body maintain homeostasis through feedback mechanisms.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.7.2. Discuss the function of each endocrine gland and the various hormones secreted.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.7.3. Model specific mechanisms through which the endocrine system maintains homeostasis (e.g., insulin/glucagon and glucose regulation; T3 / T4 and metabolic rates; calcitonin/parathyroid and calcium regulation; antidiuretic hormone and water balance; growth hormone; and cortisol and stress).
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Male and Female Reproductive Systems

HAP.8. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the male and female reproductive system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.8.1. Compare and contrast the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.8.4. Construct explanations detailing the role of hormones in the regulation of sperm and egg development. Analyze the role of negative feedback in regulation of the female menstrual cycle and pregnancy.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Cardiovascular System

HAP.10. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the cardiovascular system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.10.1. Design and use models to investigate the functions of the organs of the cardiovascular system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.10.2. Describe the flow of blood through the pulmonary system and systemic circulation.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Lymphatic System

HAP.11. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the lymphatic system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.11.3. Compare and contrast the body’s non-specific and specific lines of defense, including an analysis of the roles of various leukocytes: basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.11.4. Correlate the functions of the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, and lymphocytes to the development of immunity.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.11.5. Differentiate the role of B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes in the development of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and primary and secondary immune responses.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.11.6. Investigate various forms of acquired and passive immunity (e.g., fetal immunity, breastfed babies, vaccinations, and plasma donations).
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.11.7. Research and analyze the causes and effects of various pathological conditions (e.g., viral infections, auto-immune disorders, immunodeficiency disorders, and lymphomas).
Microorganisms I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :5

Respiratory System

HAP.12. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the respiratory system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.12.1. Design and use models to illustrate the functions of the organs of the respiratory system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.12.2. Describe structural adaptations of the respiratory tract and relate these structural features to the function of preparing incoming air for gas exchange at the alveolus.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.12.3. Identify the five mechanics of gas exchange: pulmonary ventilation, external respiration, transport gases, internal respiration, and cellular respiration.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.12.4. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to develop a model of the mechanisms that support breathing, and illustrate the inverse relationship between volume and pressure in the thoracic cavity.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

Digestive System

HAP.13. Students will investigate the structures and functions of the digestive system, including the cause and effect of diseases and disorders.
HAP.13.1. Analyze the structure-function relationship in organs of the digestive system.
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7
HAP.13.2. Use models to describe structural adaptations present in each organ of the tract and correlate the structures to specific processing of food at each stage (e.g., types of teeth; muscular, elastic wall and mucous lining of the stomach; villi and microvilli of the small intestine; and sphincters along the digestive tract).
Human biology I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :7
Human biology II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :7

MS.MAQI.MAQ Marine and Aquatic Science I

Water Properties and Quality

MAQI.MAQ.1. Students will develop an understanding of the unique physical and chemical properties of water and how those properties shape life on earth.
MAQI.MAQ.1.3. Diagram, utilizing digital or physical models, the water cycle and how it relates to the total amount of fresh water available to living things at any given time.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.1.6. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to reduce the effects of pollution in aquatic ecosystems (e.g., microplastics, garbage patches, oil spills, and eutrophication). Students will design a proposed solution based on current research and/or observations, and develop a model in order to test their design. Data from experimentation will be analyzed, organized graphically, and communicated to classmates to determine the effectiveness of the proposed solution.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Fluid Dynamics

MAQI.MAQ.2. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of fluid dynamics as it relates to both salt and freshwater systems.
MAQI.MAQ.2.1. Characterize wave features and wave properties, including wavelength, period, wave speed, breakers, and constructive waves and their effects on shoreline communities (e.g., headlands, embayments, shoreline erosion, and deposition).
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.3. Summarize principles related to currents (e.g., global wind patterns, Coriolis effect, Ekman spiral, surface, thermohaline, upwelling, downwelling, El Niño, La Niña, hurricanes, Barrier Island movement).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.4. Research, analyze, and communicate scientific arguments to support climate models that predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation and temperature and their associated impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Geological Features

MAQI.MAQ.3. Students will understand the principles of plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, and physical features of oceanic zones.
MAQI.MAQ.3.1. Use geospatial data to analyze, explain, and communicate differences among the major geological features of specific aquatic ecosystems (e.g., plate tectonics, continental rise, continental slope, abyssal plain, trenches, sea mounts, island formation, and watersheds).
MAQI.MAQ.3.2. Develop an understanding of plate tectonics to predict certain geological features (e.g., sea floor spreading, paleomagnetic measurements, and orogenesis).
MAQI.MAQ.3.4. Classify zones of freshwater sources based on the velocity of current, depth, and temperature.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Flora and Fauna

MAQI.MAQ.4. Students will examine characteristics of specific aquatic ecosystems and the effects of human and natural phenomena on those ecosystems.
MAQI.MAQ.4.1. Compare and contrast the unique biotic and abiotic characteristics of the following selected aquatic ecosystems: intertidal zone, wetlands/estuaries, coral reef, barrier islands, continental slope/shelf, abyss, rivers/streams/watersheds, and lakes/ponds.
Ecology I
Match each ecology term to its definition like Energy pyramid, Decomposer, Carnivore, Ecosystem, Owl pellet, Omnivore and many more. Which human activity would be more likely to have a positive/negative impact on the environment? Which factor determines the type of terrestrial plants that grow in an area? Which energy transfer is least likely to be found in nature? Read more...iWorksheets :4Vocabulary :2
Ecology II
Match each Ecology term to its definition like Trophic level, Food web, Consumer, Energy, Herbivore and more. Which component is not recycled in an ecosystem? Why Vultures, which are classified as scavengers, are an important part of an ecosystem? Which characteristic does creeping vine that is parasitic on other plants shares with all other heterotrophs? Read more...iWorksheets :3Vocabulary :2
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.2. Recognize representative examples of plants and animals that would be specifically adapted to the aquatic ecosystems, and identify adaptations necessary to survive.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.4. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the aquatic ecosystems’ biodiversity (e.g., land use changes, erosion and sedimentation, over-fishing, invasive/exotic species, and pollution).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.5. Explore the importance of species diversity to the biological resources needed by human populations, including food (e.g., aquaculture and mariculture), medicine, and natural aesthetics.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of natural phenomena (e.g., hurricanes, floods, drought, and sea-level rise) on the aquatic ecosystems.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.8. Enrichment: Choose an environmental issue that currently exists in one of the aquatic ecosystems and use an engineering design process to propose and develop a possible solution using scientific knowledge and best management practices (BMPs). Create an environmental action plan to include moral, legal, societal, political, and economic decisions that impact animal diversity in both the short and long term. Results from developed plans will be communicated with classmates.

MS.MAQII.MAQ. Marine and Aquatic Science II

Invertebrate Consumers

MAQII.MAQ.6. Students will investigate characteristics of aquatic invertebrates.
MAQII.MAQ.6.1. Characterize aquatic representatives of the following taxa: Protozoa (e.g., foraminiferians, radiolarians, amoeba, and paramecium), Porifera, Cnidaria, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida, Rotifera, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Bryozoa, Brachiopoda, and Echinodermata.
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.2. Identify characteristics that are shared and derived using graphical representations of animal evolution (i.e., cladograms and phylogenetic trees) and develop cladograms and phylogenetic trees.
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.3. Develop a dichotomous classification key to be used in the identification of sample aquatic invertebrates.
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.4. Compare and contrast major body plans (e.g., asymmetry, radial, bilateral symmetry, acoelomate, pseudocoelomate, and eucoelomate).
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.5. Explain various life cycles found among animals (e.g., polyp and medusa in cnidarians, multiple hosts and stages in the platyhelminthic life cycle, and arthropod metamorphosis).
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.6. Dissect representative taxa (e.g., clam and squid), collect data, compare their internal and external anatomy, analyze, explain, and communicate results.
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.6.7. Using key morphological and physiological adaptations found within animal taxa, assess how animals interact with their environment to determine their ecological roles.
Microorganisms II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :5
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Vertebrate Consumers

MAQII.MAQ.7. Students will investigate characteristics of aquatic invertebrates.
MAQII.MAQ.7.1. Characterize aquatic representatives of the following taxa: Hemichordata, Urochordata, Cephalochordata, and Vertebrata (including Agnatha, Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, and Mammalia).
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.7.3. Utilize a dichotomous key to identify select aquatic vertebrates.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.7.5. Dissect representative taxa (e.g., shark, fish); collect data; compare their internal and external anatomy; and analyze, explain, and communicate results.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQII.MAQ.7.6. Using key morphological and physiological adaptations found within aquatic vertebrate taxa, assess how animals interact with their environment to determine their ecological roles.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.PHS. Physical Science

Nature of Matter

PHS.1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of matter.
PHS.1.1. Use contextual evidence to describe particle theory of matter. Examine the particle properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
PHS.1.2. Use scientific research to generate models to compare physical and chemical properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures.
PHS.1.4. Design and conduct investigations to explore techniques in measurements of mass, volume, length, and temperature.

Periodic Table

PHS.3. Students will analyze the organization of the periodic table of elements to predict atomic interactions.
PHS.3.1. Use contextual evidence to determine the organization of the periodic table, including metals, metalloids, and nonmetals; symbols; atomic number; atomic mass; chemical families/groups; and periods/series.
PHS.3.3. Using naming conventions for binary compounds, write the compound name from the formula, and write balanced formulas from the name (e.g., carbon dioxide -CO2, sodium chloride - NaCl, iron III oxide- Fe2O3, and calcium bromide -CaBr2).
PHS.3.4. Use naming conventions to name common acids and common compounds used in classroom labs (e.g., sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), NaHCO3; hydrochloric acid, HCl; sulfuric acid, H2SO4; acetic acid (vinegar), HC2H3O2; and nitric acid, HNO3).
Chemical Compounds - Set I
Worksheets :3
Chemical Compounds - Set II
Worksheets :3
Acids, Bases and Salts
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :1

The Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy

PHS.4. Students will analyze changes in matter and the relationship of these changes to the law of conservation of matter and energy.
PHS.4.1. Design and conduct experiments to investigate physical and chemical changes of various household products (e.g., rusting, sour milk, crushing, grinding, tearing, boiling, and freezing) and reactions of common chemicals that produce color changes or gases.
PHS.4.3. Apply the concept of conservation of matter to balancing simple chemical equations.
Chemical Equations
Worksheets :3

Newton’s Laws of Motion

PHS.5. Students will analyze the scientific principles of motion, force, and work.
PHS.5.1. Research the scientific contributions of Newton, and use models to communicate Newton’s principles.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Momentum and Collisions
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
PHS.5.2. Design and conduct an investigation to study the motion of an object using properties such as displacement, time of motion, velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PHS.5.3. Collect, organize, and interpret graphical data using correct metric units to determine the average speed of an object.
PHS.5.7. Use mathematical and computational representations to create graphs and formulas that describe the relationships between force, work, and energy (i.e., W=Fd, KE=½ mv^2, PE=mgh, W=KE).

Waves

PHS.6. Students will explore the characteristics of waves.
PHS.6.2. Analyze examples and evidence of transverse and longitudinal waves found in nature (e.g., earthquakes, ocean waves, and sound waves).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.3. Generate wave models to explore energy transference.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.4. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and build a musical instrument to demonstrate the influence of resonance on music.
Sound
Worksheets :3
PHS.6.6. Research real-world applications to create models or visible representations of the electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light, infrared radiation, and ultraviolet radiation.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.7. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and construct an apparatus that forms images to project on a screen or magnify images using lenses and/or mirrors.
Optics
Worksheets :3

Energy

PHS.7. Students will examine different forms of energy and energy transformations.
PHS.7.1. Using digital resources, explore forms of energy (e.g., potential and kinetic energy, mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, radiant, and nuclear energy).
PHS.7.2. Use scientific investigations to explore the transformation of energy from one type to another (e.g., potential to kinetic energy, and mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, radiant, and nuclear energy interactions).
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
PHS.7.3. Using mathematical and computational analysis, calculate potential and kinetic energy based on given data. Use equations such as PE=mgh and KE=½ mv^2.

Thermal Energy

PHS.8. Students will demonstrate an understanding of temperature scales, heat, and thermal energy transfer.
PHS.8.2. Apply particle theory to phase change and analyze freezing point, melting point, boiling point, vaporization, and condensation of different substances.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Heat
Worksheets :3

Electricity

PHS.9. Students will explore basic principles of magnetism and electricity (e.g., static electricity, current electricity, and circuits).
PHS.9.1. Use digital resources and online simulations to investigate the basic principles of electricity, including static electricity, current electricity, and circuits. Use digital resources (e.g., online simulations) to build a model showing the relationship between magnetic fields and electric currents.
Electricity and Electrical Energy - Set I
Worksheets :4
Electricity and Electrical Energy - Set II
Worksheets :3
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHS.9.2. Distinguish between magnets, motors, and generators, and evaluate modern industrial uses of each.
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHS.9.3. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to construct a working electric motor to perform a task. Communicate the design process and comparisons of task performance efficiencies.
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHS.9.4. Use an engineering design process to construct and test conductors, semiconductors, and insulators using various materials to optimize efficiency.
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3

MS.PHY. Physics

One-Dimensional Motion

PHY.1. Students will investigate and understand how to analyze and interpret data.
PHY.1.1. Investigate and analyze evidence gained through observation or experimental design regarding the one-dimensional (1-D) motion of objects. Design and conduct experiments to generate and interpret graphical evidence of distance, velocity, and acceleration through motion.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PHY.1.2. Interpret and predict 1-D motion based on displacement vs. time, velocity vs. time, or acceleration vs. time graphs (e.g., free-falling objects).
PHY.1.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to solve problems using kinematic equations.
PHY.1.4. Use graphical analysis to derive kinematic equations.
PHY.1.5. Differentiate and give examples of motion concepts such as distance-displacement, speed-velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PHY.1.6. Design and mathematically/graphically analyze quantitative data to explore displacement, velocity, and acceleration of various objects. Use probe systems, video analysis, graphical analysis software, digital spreadsheets, and/or online simulations.
PHY.1.7. Design different scenarios, and predict graph shapes for distance/time, velocity/time, and acceleration/time graphs.
PHY.1.8. Given a 1D motion graph students should replicate the motion predicted by the graph.

Newton’s Laws

PHY.2. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to Newtonian dynamics.
PHY.2.1. Identify forces acting on a system by applying Newton’s laws mathematically and graphically (e.g., vector and scalar quantities).
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Momentum and Collisions
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.4. Use vectors and mathematical analysis to explore the 2D motion of objects (i.e., projectile and circular motion).
PHY.2.5. Use mathematical and computational analysis to derive simple equations of motion for various systems using Newton’s second law (e.g. net force equations).
PHY.2.6. Use mathematical and computational analysis to explore forces (e.g., friction, force applied, normal, and tension).
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Mechanics
Worksheets :3
PHY.2.7. Analyze real-world applications to draw conclusions about Newton’s three laws of motion using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Laws of Motion - Set I
Worksheets :4
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Forces - Set II
Worksheets :3
Momentum and Collisions
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.10. Apply the effects of the universal gravitation law to generate a digital/physical graph, and interpret the forces between two masses, acceleration due to gravity, and planetary motion (e.g., situations where g is constant, as in falling bodies).
PHY.2.11. Explain centripetal acceleration while undergoing uniform circular motion to explore Kepler’s third law using online simulations, models, and/or probe systems.

Work and Energy

PHY.3. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to work and energy.
PHY.3.1. Use mathematical and computational analysis to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the concept of work, energy, and power to explain and apply the conservation of energy.
Work and Energy
Worksheets :4
PHY.3.3. Through real-world applications, draw conclusions about mechanical potential energy and kinetic energy using online simulations and/or laboratory experiences.
PHY.3.4. Design and conduct investigations to compare conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy in perfectly inelastic and elastic collisions using probe systems, online simulations, and/or laboratory experiences.
PHY.3.6. Enrichment: Design, conduct, and communicate investigations that explore how temperature and thermal energy relate to molecular motion and states of matter.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3
Gases
Worksheets :3
Properties of Matter
Worksheets :4
Heat
Worksheets :3
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
PHY.3.7. Enrichment: Use mathematical and computational analysis to analyze problems involving specific heat and heat capacity.
Heat
Worksheets :3
PHY.3.8. Enrichment: Research to compare the first and second laws of thermodynamics as related to heat engines, refrigerators, and thermal efficiency.
Thermodynamics
Worksheets :4
PHY.3.9. Explore the kinetic theory in terms of kinetic energy of ideal gases using digital resources.
States of Matter
Worksheets :3

Waves

PHY.4. Students will investigate and explore wave properties.
PHY.4.1. Analyze the characteristics and properties of simple harmonic motions, sound, and light.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Light
Worksheets :3
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
PHY.4.5. Design, investigate, and collect data on standing waves and waves in specific media (e.g., stretched string, water surface, and air) using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Sound
Worksheets :3
PHY.4.6. Explore and explain the Doppler effect as it relates to a moving source and to a moving observer using online simulations, probe systems, and/or real-world experiences.
Sound
Worksheets :3
PHY.4.9. Research the different bands of electromagnetic radiation, including characteristics, properties, and similarities/differences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.12. Enrichment: Research uses of the electromagnetic spectrum or photoelectric effect.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

Electricity and Magnetism

PHY.5. Students will investigate the key components of electricity and magnetism.
PHY.5.1. Analyze and explain electricity and the relationship between electricity and magnetism.
Electricity and Electrical Energy - Set I
Worksheets :4
Electricity and Electrical Energy - Set II
Worksheets :3
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHY.5.2. Explore the characteristics of static charge and how a static charge is generated using simulations.
PHY.5.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to analyze problems dealing with electric field, electric potential, current, voltage, and resistance as related to Ohm’s law.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PHY.5.4. Develop and use models (e.g., circuit drawing and mathematical representation) to explain how electric circuits work by tracing the path of electrons, including concepts of energy transformation, transfer, conservation of energy, electric charge, and resistance using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.5. Design and conduct an investigation of magnetic poles, magnetic flux and magnetic field using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Magnetism
Worksheets :3
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHY.5.6. Use schematic diagrams to analyze the current flow in series and parallel electric circuits, given the component resistances and the imposed electric potential.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.8. Enrichment: Design and construct a simple motor to develop an explanation of how the motor transforms electrical energy into mechanical energy and work.
Electromagnetism
The production of a magnetic field around an electrical current is called electromagnetism. Read more...iWorksheets :3
PHY.5.9. Enrichment: Design and draw a schematic of a circuit that will turn on/off a light from two locations in a room like those found in most homes.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

Nuclear Energy

PHY.6. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of nuclear energy.
PHY.6.2. Explore the mass number and atomic number of the nucleus of an isotope of a given chemical element.
Elements - Set I
Worksheets :3
Elements - Set II
Worksheets :3
Nuclear Chemistry
Worksheets :3
Atomic and Nuclear Physics
FreeWorksheets :4

MS.ZI.ZOO. Zoology I

Evolution

ZI.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZI.ZOO.1.1. Develop and use dichotomous keys to distinguish animals from protists, plants, and fungi.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ZI.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ZI.ZOO.1.3. Recognize that the classification of living organisms is based on their evolutionary history and/or similarities in fossils and living organisms.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ZI.ZOO.1.5. Design models to illustrate the interaction between changing environments and genetic variation in natural selection leading to adaptations in populations and differential success of populations.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

Phyla Porifera and Cnidaria

ZI.ZOO.2. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Porifera and phylum Cnidaria and how each adapts to their environments.
ZI.ZOO.2.1. Differentiate among asymmetry, radial symmetry, and bilateral symmetry in an animal’s body plan.
Introduction to animals
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.2. Identify the anatomy and physiology of a sponge, including how specialized cells within sponges work cooperatively without forming tissues to capture and digest food.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.3. Describe the importance of phylum Porifera in aquatic habitats.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.4. Create a model, either physical or digital, illustrating the anatomy of a sponge, tracing the flow of water.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.5. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to determine the quantity of water that may be absorbed per unit in a natural sponge versus a synthetic sponge.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.7. Describe how nematocysts (stinging cells) of Cnidarians are used for capturing food and for defense.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.9. Describe the ecological importance of and human impacts on coral reefs.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.2.10. Create a digital or physical model illustrating the anatomy of a cnidarian, citing similarities and differences between polyps and medusas.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Mollusca

ZI.ZOO.3. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Mollusca, and how they adapt to their environments.
ZI.ZOO.3.1. Considering the diversity of mollusks, explain how they all share a common body plan (i.e., mantle, visceral mass, and foot).
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.2. Describe why mollusks are classified as eucoelomates.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.3. Explain how the mantle is used in forming the shell.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.4. Describe how the radula is used in feeding.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.5. Develop a dichotomous key to contrast characteristics of gastropods, bivalves, and cephalopods.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.6. Examine how the unique characteristics of cephalopods lead to survival.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.7. Create a model comparing the anatomy of gastropods, bivalves, and cephalopods.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.3.8. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to model the jet propulsion utilized by cephalopods in mechanical design of fluid systems (e.g., improving hydraulic systems).
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phyla Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, and Annelida

ZI.ZOO.4. Students will describe the evolution of structure and function of phylum Platyhelminthes, phylum Nematoda, and phylum Annelida.
ZI.ZOO.4.1. Define and describe the closed circulatory system of an annelid.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.2. Differentiate between parasitic and free living.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.3. Compare and contrast the characteristics and lifestyles of flatworms, roundworms, and segmented worms.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.4. Create a model comparing acoelomate, pseudocoelomate, and eucoelomate body plans of Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, and Annelida.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.5. Describe the evolutionary importance of the segmented body plans of annelids.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.6. Dissect representative taxa, and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.7. Enrichment: Design, conduct, and communicate results of an experiment demonstrating the importance of flatworms, roundworms, and annelids for human use (e.g., the earthworm in agriculture and the leech in medicine).
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.4.8. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and construct a system to utilize flatworms, roundworms, or annelids to meet a human need.
Invertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Arthropoda

ZI.ZOO.5. Students will understand the basic structure and function of phylum Arthropoda, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZI.ZOO.5.1. Describe the evolutionary advantages of segmented bodies, hard exoskeletons, and jointed appendages to arthropods and how they contribute to arthropods being the largest phyla in species diversity and the most geographically diverse.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.5.2. Explain how the exoskeleton is used in locomotion, protection, and development.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.5.3. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to develop a biomimicry of an arthropod’s exoskeleton to meet a human need.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.5.4. Identify organisms and characteristics of chelicerates, crustaceans, and insects.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.5.9. Dissect representative taxa, and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Echinodermata

ZI.ZOO.6. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Echinodermata, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZI.ZOO.6.1. Recognize that the echinoderms have spines on their skin that are extensions of plates that form from the endoskeleton.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.6.3. Describe sea urchins’ and sea cucumbers’ defense structures and behaviors.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.6.5. Describe how the water vascular system is used for locomotion, feeding, and gas exchange.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.6.7. Dissect representative taxa and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZI.ZOO.6.8. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to model the water vascular system in hydraulic systems to meet a societal need.
Invertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.ZII.ZOO. Zoology II

Evolution

ZII.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZII.ZOO.1.1. Develop and use dichotomous keys to distinguish animals from protists, plants, and fungi.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ZII.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ZII.ZOO.1.3. Recognize that the classification of living organisms is based on their evolutionary history and/or similarities in fossils and living organisms.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ZII.ZOO.1.5. Design models to illustrate the interaction between changing environments and genetic variation in natural selection leading to adaptations in populations and differential success of populations.
Evolution and classification
Categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences. Evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. Analyze the effects of evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation and recombination. Read more...iWorksheets :3

Phylum Chordata, Classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes

ZII.ZOO.7. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.7.1. Students will understand why evolutionary changes lead to the diversity of fish and how they have adapted to the different aquatic environments.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.7.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the biodiversity of fish species (e.g., overfishing and invasive species).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.7.7. Dissect representative taxa and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Chordata, Classes Amphibia and Reptilia

ZII.ZOO.8. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, classes Amphibia and Reptilia, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.8.1. Understand the evolution of tetrapods and the development of the structure and function of body systems and life cycles.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.8.2. Describe the constraints that require amphibians to spend part of their lives in water and part on land, including the morphological and physiological changes as they pass from one stage of their life cycle to the next.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.8.3. Describe adaptations that have led to reptiles living on land successfully.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.8.4. Define what it means to be ectothermic, and identify ways in which reptiles regulate their body temperature.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.8.9. Identify the amniotic egg as the major derived characteristic of reptiles.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.8.10. Dissect representative taxa and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Vertebrates I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Chordata, Class Aves

ZII.ZOO.9. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, class Aves, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.9.1. Trace the evolutionary history of modern birds beginning with the theropods. Relate how today’s birds have adapted to changing environments.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.3. Define the term endothermic, and describe how birds regulate body temperature in extreme environments.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.5. Explain how birds of prey use their keen sense of sight to locate and attack prey.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.6. Describe how corvids use their intellect for problem solving and locating food storage.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.9. Demonstrate how different adaptations of the bird beak and feet allow them to feed and survive in different environments.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.11. Describe the parenting behavior of different birds in order to incubate their eggs and care for hatchlings.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.12. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and construct an incubator for hatching abandoned eggs.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.9.14. Dissect representative taxa and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Phylum Chordata, Class Mammalia

ZII.ZOO.10. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, class Mammalia, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.10.1. Understand the characteristics and behaviors that distinguish mammals from other phyla, and use characteristics and behaviors to distinguish the major orders, including primates. Explain how human impact has changed the environments of other organisms.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.10.2. Describe the characteristics of the first true mammal.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.10.3. Distinguish among monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians, and describe the importance and differences in the placenta in marsupials and eutherians.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.10.5. Dissect representative taxa and compare their internal and external anatomy and complexity.
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ZII.ZOO.10.6. Explain how human impacts have changed the environment of aquatic and terrestrial organisms (e.g., habitat destruction, urbanization, and climate change).
Vertebrates II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.ESS. Earth and Space Science

Earth in the Universe

ESS.1A. Students will develop an understanding of the universe, its development, immense size, and composition.
ESS.1A.1. Describe the Big Bang theory and summarize observations (e.g., cosmic microwave background radiation, Hubble’s law, and redshift caused by the Doppler effect) as evidence to support the formation and expansion of the universe.
ESS.1A.2. Interpret information from the Hertzsprung -Russell diagram to differentiate types of stars, including our sun, according to size, magnitude, and classification.
ESS.1A.3. Organize and interpret data sets for patterns and trends to compare and contrast stellar evolution in order to explain and communicate how a star changes during its life.
ESS.1B. Students will develop an understanding of Earth, the solar system, and the laws that predict the motion of celestial bodies.
ESS.1B.1. Read and evaluate scientific information for mechanisms/results (e.g., the solar nebular theory) to explain how the solar system was formed. Cite evidence and develop a logical argument.
ESS.1B.2. Compare and contrast celestial bodies (e.g., planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and the Oort cloud) and their motion in our solar system (e.g., revolution and rotation). Build an Analemma calendar.
ESS.1B.3. Design a model (e.g., a gravity simulation using PVC and a neoprene screen) to demonstrate Kepler’s laws and the relationships of the orbits of objects in our solar system. Relate them to Newton’s law of universal gravitation and laws of motion.

Earth Structure and History

ESS.2A. Students will develop an understanding of the structure and composition of Earth and its materials.
ESS.2A.2. Analyze and interpret data to explain and communicate the differentiation of Earth’s physical divisions (e.g., lithosphere and asthenosphere) using data from seismic waves and Earth’s magnetic field.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2A.3. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of mineral specimens to identify minerals and mineral deposits/groups (e.g., oxides, carbonates, halides, sulfides, sulfates, silicates, and phosphates). Include the relationship between chemical bonds, chemical formulas, mineral use, and mineral properties.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ESS.2A.4. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of rock specimens to identify and categorize igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Include the processes that generate the transformation of rocks.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2B. Students will develop an understanding of the history and evolution of the earth.
ESS.2B.1. Research, analyze, and evaluate the contributions of William Smith, James Hutton, Nicolaus Steno, Charles Lyell, and others to physical geology.
ESS.2B.2. Apply different techniques (e.g., superposition, original horizontality, cross-cutting relationships, lateral continuity, principle of inclusions, fossil succession, and unconformities) to analyze and interpret the relative age of actual sequences, models, or photographs.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.3. Use mathematical concepts to calculate the absolute age of earth materials using actual or simulated isotope ratios.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.4. Research, analyze, and explain the origin of geologic features and processes that result from plate tectonics, including sea floor spreading, earthquake activity, volcanic activity, mountain building, and location of natural resources.
ESS.2B.5. Use mathematical representations to interpret seismic graphs to triangulate the location of an earthquake’s epicenter and magnitude and to correlate the frequency and magnitude of an earthquake.
ESS.2B.6. Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to determine how factors (e.g., wind velocity, water velocity, ice, and temperature) may affect the rate of weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Earth’s Systems and Cycles

ESS.3. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s systems and cycles.
ESS.3.1. Use mathematical representations (e.g., latitude, longitude, and maps) to calculate the angle of noon solar incidence and relate the value to day length, distribution of sunlight, and seasonal change.
ESS.3.3. Explain how temperature and density of ocean water influence circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.4. Research and communicate information to explain the importance of the transfer of thermal energy among the hydrosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere. Include the unique physical and chemical properties of water, the water cycle, and energy transfer within the rock cycle.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.5. Analyze and interpret weather data using maps and global weather systems to explain and communicate the relationships among air masses, pressure systems, and frontal boundaries.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.6. Construct an explanation from data sets to obtain and evaluate scientific information to construct scientific arguments on changes in climate caused by various natural factors (e.g., plate tectonics and continent location and Milankovitch cycles) versus anthropogenic factors (e.g., fossil fuel use and agricultural factors).
ESS.3.7. Cite evidence and develop logical arguments to identify the cause and effect relationships of the evolutionary milestones (e.g., photosynthesis and the atmosphere, the evolution of multicellular animals, the development of shells, and the colonization of terrestrial environments by plants and animals) that most profoundly shaped Earth’s systems.
ESS.3.8. Analyze and interpret the record of shared ancestry, evolution, and extinction as related to natural selection using fossils.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Earth’s Resources and Human Activity

ESS.4. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s resources and the impact of human activities.
ESS.4.1. Research, evaluate, and communicate about how human life on Earth shapes Earth’s systems and responds to the interaction of Earth’s systems (e.g., geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Examine how geochemical and ecological processes interact through time to cycle matter and energy and how human activity alters the rates of these processes.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.2. Research, assess, and communicate how Earth’s systems influence the distribution of life, including how various natural hazards and geologic events (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides, tornadoes, and hurricanes) have shaped the course of human history.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.3. Analyze earthquake and volcanic data to determine patterns that can lead to predicting such hazards and mitigating impact to humans.

MS.ENV. Environmental Science

Natural Resources Use and Conservation

ENV.2. Students will relate the impact of human activities on the environment, conservation activities, and efforts to maintain and restore ecosystems.
ENV.2.5. Research various resources related to water quality and pollution (e.g., nonfictional text, EPA’s Surf Your Watershed, MDEQ publications) and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Human Activities and Climate Change

ENV.3. Students will discuss the direct and indirect impacts of certain types of human activities on the Earth’s climate.
ENV.3.2. Interpret data and climate models to predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation, temperature, impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).

Human Sustainability

ENV.4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of human sustainability and the environment.
ENV.4.1. Identify human impact and develop a solution for protection of the atmosphere, considering pollutants (e.g., acid rain, air pollution, smog, ozone layer, or increased levels of greenhouse gases) and the impacts of pollutants on human health (e.g., asthma, COPD, emphysema, and cancer).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.2. Evaluate data and other information to explain how key natural resources (e.g., water sources, fertile soils, concentrations of minerals, and fossil fuels), natural hazards, and climate changes influence human activity (e.g., mass migrations, human health).
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.4. Enrichment: Explore online resources related to air pollution to determine air quality in a geographic area and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.FB. Foundations of Biology

Biological Evolution

FB.5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Earth’s fossil record and its indication of the diversity of life over time.
FB.5.2. Analyze and interpret data to support claims that different types of fossils provide evidence of the diversity of life that has existed on Earth and of the relationships between past and existing life on Earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Ecological Principals

FB.6. Students will understand the interdependence of living organisms and their environment.
FB.6.4. Develop and use models to discuss the climate, flora, and fauna of the terrestrial and aquatic biomes of the world.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
FB.6.7. Enrichment: Design solutions to reduce the impact of human activity on the ecosystem.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.FSL. Foundations of Science Literacy

Nature of Science

FSL.3A. Students will apply science and engineering practices and skills to scientific investigations.
FSL.3A.2. Analyze data from simple experiments and construct organized models (e.g., data tables, graphs) detailing results from the experiments.
FSL.3A.3. Demonstrate the proper use of safety procedures and scientific laboratory equipment. Select and use appropriate tools and instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data.
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
FSL.3B. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze and interpret data found in various graphics including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3B.3. Translate information into a table, graph, or diagram. Determine patterns, trends, and relationships as the values of variables change.
FSL.3C. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze scientific investigations found in various experimental designs including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3C.1. Analyze the methods and choice of tools used in simple and complex experimental designs.
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3

MS.MAQI.MAQ Marine and Aquatic Science I

Water Properties and Quality

MAQI.MAQ.1. Students will develop an understanding of the unique physical and chemical properties of water and how those properties shape life on earth.
MAQI.MAQ.1.3. Diagram, utilizing digital or physical models, the water cycle and how it relates to the total amount of fresh water available to living things at any given time.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.1.6. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to reduce the effects of pollution in aquatic ecosystems (e.g., microplastics, garbage patches, oil spills, and eutrophication). Students will design a proposed solution based on current research and/or observations, and develop a model in order to test their design. Data from experimentation will be analyzed, organized graphically, and communicated to classmates to determine the effectiveness of the proposed solution.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Fluid Dynamics

MAQI.MAQ.2. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of fluid dynamics as it relates to both salt and freshwater systems.
MAQI.MAQ.2.1. Characterize wave features and wave properties, including wavelength, period, wave speed, breakers, and constructive waves and their effects on shoreline communities (e.g., headlands, embayments, shoreline erosion, and deposition).
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.3. Summarize principles related to currents (e.g., global wind patterns, Coriolis effect, Ekman spiral, surface, thermohaline, upwelling, downwelling, El Niño, La Niña, hurricanes, Barrier Island movement).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.4. Research, analyze, and communicate scientific arguments to support climate models that predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation and temperature and their associated impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Geological Features

MAQI.MAQ.3. Students will understand the principles of plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, and physical features of oceanic zones.
MAQI.MAQ.3.1. Use geospatial data to analyze, explain, and communicate differences among the major geological features of specific aquatic ecosystems (e.g., plate tectonics, continental rise, continental slope, abyssal plain, trenches, sea mounts, island formation, and watersheds).
MAQI.MAQ.3.2. Develop an understanding of plate tectonics to predict certain geological features (e.g., sea floor spreading, paleomagnetic measurements, and orogenesis).
MAQI.MAQ.3.4. Classify zones of freshwater sources based on the velocity of current, depth, and temperature.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Flora and Fauna

MAQI.MAQ.4. Students will examine characteristics of specific aquatic ecosystems and the effects of human and natural phenomena on those ecosystems.
MAQI.MAQ.4.1. Compare and contrast the unique biotic and abiotic characteristics of the following selected aquatic ecosystems: intertidal zone, wetlands/estuaries, coral reef, barrier islands, continental slope/shelf, abyss, rivers/streams/watersheds, and lakes/ponds.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.4. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the aquatic ecosystems’ biodiversity (e.g., land use changes, erosion and sedimentation, over-fishing, invasive/exotic species, and pollution).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.5. Explore the importance of species diversity to the biological resources needed by human populations, including food (e.g., aquaculture and mariculture), medicine, and natural aesthetics.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of natural phenomena (e.g., hurricanes, floods, drought, and sea-level rise) on the aquatic ecosystems.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.8. Enrichment: Choose an environmental issue that currently exists in one of the aquatic ecosystems and use an engineering design process to propose and develop a possible solution using scientific knowledge and best management practices (BMPs). Create an environmental action plan to include moral, legal, societal, political, and economic decisions that impact animal diversity in both the short and long term. Results from developed plans will be communicated with classmates.

MS.PHS. Physical Science

Newton’s Laws of Motion

PHS.5. Students will analyze the scientific principles of motion, force, and work.
PHS.5.1. Research the scientific contributions of Newton, and use models to communicate Newton’s principles.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHS.5.2. Design and conduct an investigation to study the motion of an object using properties such as displacement, time of motion, velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHS.5.3. Collect, organize, and interpret graphical data using correct metric units to determine the average speed of an object.
PHS.5.7. Use mathematical and computational representations to create graphs and formulas that describe the relationships between force, work, and energy (i.e., W=Fd, KE=½ mv^2, PE=mgh, W=KE).

Waves

PHS.6. Students will explore the characteristics of waves.
PHS.6.2. Analyze examples and evidence of transverse and longitudinal waves found in nature (e.g., earthquakes, ocean waves, and sound waves).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.3. Generate wave models to explore energy transference.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.6. Research real-world applications to create models or visible representations of the electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light, infrared radiation, and ultraviolet radiation.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.7. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and construct an apparatus that forms images to project on a screen or magnify images using lenses and/or mirrors.
Optics
Worksheets :3

Energy

PHS.7. Students will examine different forms of energy and energy transformations.
PHS.7.1. Using digital resources, explore forms of energy (e.g., potential and kinetic energy, mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, radiant, and nuclear energy).
PHS.7.3. Using mathematical and computational analysis, calculate potential and kinetic energy based on given data. Use equations such as PE=mgh and KE=½ mv^2.

Electricity

PHS.9. Students will explore basic principles of magnetism and electricity (e.g., static electricity, current electricity, and circuits).
PHS.9.1. Use digital resources and online simulations to investigate the basic principles of electricity, including static electricity, current electricity, and circuits. Use digital resources (e.g., online simulations) to build a model showing the relationship between magnetic fields and electric currents.
PHS.9.4. Use an engineering design process to construct and test conductors, semiconductors, and insulators using various materials to optimize efficiency.
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3

MS.PHY. Physics

One-Dimensional Motion

PHY.1. Students will investigate and understand how to analyze and interpret data.
PHY.1.1. Investigate and analyze evidence gained through observation or experimental design regarding the one-dimensional (1-D) motion of objects. Design and conduct experiments to generate and interpret graphical evidence of distance, velocity, and acceleration through motion.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.1.2. Interpret and predict 1-D motion based on displacement vs. time, velocity vs. time, or acceleration vs. time graphs (e.g., free-falling objects).
PHY.1.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to solve problems using kinematic equations.
PHY.1.4. Use graphical analysis to derive kinematic equations.
PHY.1.5. Differentiate and give examples of motion concepts such as distance-displacement, speed-velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.1.6. Design and mathematically/graphically analyze quantitative data to explore displacement, velocity, and acceleration of various objects. Use probe systems, video analysis, graphical analysis software, digital spreadsheets, and/or online simulations.
PHY.1.7. Design different scenarios, and predict graph shapes for distance/time, velocity/time, and acceleration/time graphs.
PHY.1.8. Given a 1D motion graph students should replicate the motion predicted by the graph.

Newton’s Laws

PHY.2. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to Newtonian dynamics.
PHY.2.1. Identify forces acting on a system by applying Newton’s laws mathematically and graphically (e.g., vector and scalar quantities).
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.4. Use vectors and mathematical analysis to explore the 2D motion of objects (i.e., projectile and circular motion).
PHY.2.5. Use mathematical and computational analysis to derive simple equations of motion for various systems using Newton’s second law (e.g. net force equations).
PHY.2.6. Use mathematical and computational analysis to explore forces (e.g., friction, force applied, normal, and tension).
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.7. Analyze real-world applications to draw conclusions about Newton’s three laws of motion using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.10. Apply the effects of the universal gravitation law to generate a digital/physical graph, and interpret the forces between two masses, acceleration due to gravity, and planetary motion (e.g., situations where g is constant, as in falling bodies).
PHY.2.11. Explain centripetal acceleration while undergoing uniform circular motion to explore Kepler’s third law using online simulations, models, and/or probe systems.

Work and Energy

PHY.3. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to work and energy.
PHY.3.3. Through real-world applications, draw conclusions about mechanical potential energy and kinetic energy using online simulations and/or laboratory experiences.

Waves

PHY.4. Students will investigate and explore wave properties.
PHY.4.1. Analyze the characteristics and properties of simple harmonic motions, sound, and light.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.5. Design, investigate, and collect data on standing waves and waves in specific media (e.g., stretched string, water surface, and air) using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.9. Research the different bands of electromagnetic radiation, including characteristics, properties, and similarities/differences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.12. Enrichment: Research uses of the electromagnetic spectrum or photoelectric effect.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

Electricity and Magnetism

PHY.5. Students will investigate the key components of electricity and magnetism.
PHY.5.1. Analyze and explain electricity and the relationship between electricity and magnetism.
PHY.5.2. Explore the characteristics of static charge and how a static charge is generated using simulations.
PHY.5.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to analyze problems dealing with electric field, electric potential, current, voltage, and resistance as related to Ohm’s law.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PHY.5.4. Develop and use models (e.g., circuit drawing and mathematical representation) to explain how electric circuits work by tracing the path of electrons, including concepts of energy transformation, transfer, conservation of energy, electric charge, and resistance using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.6. Use schematic diagrams to analyze the current flow in series and parallel electric circuits, given the component resistances and the imposed electric potential.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.9. Enrichment: Design and draw a schematic of a circuit that will turn on/off a light from two locations in a room like those found in most homes.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

MS.ZI.ZOO. Zoology I

Evolution

ZI.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZI.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Phyla Porifera and Cnidaria

ZI.ZOO.2. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Porifera and phylum Cnidaria and how each adapts to their environments.
ZI.ZOO.2.9. Describe the ecological importance of and human impacts on coral reefs.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.ZII.ZOO. Zoology II

Evolution

ZII.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZII.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Phylum Chordata, Classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes

ZII.ZOO.7. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.7.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the biodiversity of fish species (e.g., overfishing and invasive species).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.ESS. Earth and Space Science

Earth in the Universe

ESS.1A. Students will develop an understanding of the universe, its development, immense size, and composition.
ESS.1A.1. Describe the Big Bang theory and summarize observations (e.g., cosmic microwave background radiation, Hubble’s law, and redshift caused by the Doppler effect) as evidence to support the formation and expansion of the universe.
ESS.1A.2. Interpret information from the Hertzsprung -Russell diagram to differentiate types of stars, including our sun, according to size, magnitude, and classification.
ESS.1A.3. Organize and interpret data sets for patterns and trends to compare and contrast stellar evolution in order to explain and communicate how a star changes during its life.
ESS.1B. Students will develop an understanding of Earth, the solar system, and the laws that predict the motion of celestial bodies.
ESS.1B.1. Read and evaluate scientific information for mechanisms/results (e.g., the solar nebular theory) to explain how the solar system was formed. Cite evidence and develop a logical argument.
ESS.1B.2. Compare and contrast celestial bodies (e.g., planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and the Oort cloud) and their motion in our solar system (e.g., revolution and rotation). Build an Analemma calendar.
ESS.1B.3. Design a model (e.g., a gravity simulation using PVC and a neoprene screen) to demonstrate Kepler’s laws and the relationships of the orbits of objects in our solar system. Relate them to Newton’s law of universal gravitation and laws of motion.

Earth Structure and History

ESS.2A. Students will develop an understanding of the structure and composition of Earth and its materials.
ESS.2A.2. Analyze and interpret data to explain and communicate the differentiation of Earth’s physical divisions (e.g., lithosphere and asthenosphere) using data from seismic waves and Earth’s magnetic field.
Earth's Crust
FreeWorksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2A.3. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of mineral specimens to identify minerals and mineral deposits/groups (e.g., oxides, carbonates, halides, sulfides, sulfates, silicates, and phosphates). Include the relationship between chemical bonds, chemical formulas, mineral use, and mineral properties.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Minerals II
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :2
ESS.2A.4. Investigate the physical and/or chemical characteristics of rock specimens to identify and categorize igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Include the processes that generate the transformation of rocks.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.2B. Students will develop an understanding of the history and evolution of the earth.
ESS.2B.1. Research, analyze, and evaluate the contributions of William Smith, James Hutton, Nicolaus Steno, Charles Lyell, and others to physical geology.
ESS.2B.2. Apply different techniques (e.g., superposition, original horizontality, cross-cutting relationships, lateral continuity, principle of inclusions, fossil succession, and unconformities) to analyze and interpret the relative age of actual sequences, models, or photographs.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.3. Use mathematical concepts to calculate the absolute age of earth materials using actual or simulated isotope ratios.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3
ESS.2B.4. Research, analyze, and explain the origin of geologic features and processes that result from plate tectonics, including sea floor spreading, earthquake activity, volcanic activity, mountain building, and location of natural resources.
ESS.2B.5. Use mathematical representations to interpret seismic graphs to triangulate the location of an earthquake’s epicenter and magnitude and to correlate the frequency and magnitude of an earthquake.
ESS.2B.6. Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to determine how factors (e.g., wind velocity, water velocity, ice, and temperature) may affect the rate of weathering.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

Earth’s Systems and Cycles

ESS.3. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s systems and cycles.
ESS.3.1. Use mathematical representations (e.g., latitude, longitude, and maps) to calculate the angle of noon solar incidence and relate the value to day length, distribution of sunlight, and seasonal change.
ESS.3.3. Explain how temperature and density of ocean water influence circulation.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.4. Research and communicate information to explain the importance of the transfer of thermal energy among the hydrosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere. Include the unique physical and chemical properties of water, the water cycle, and energy transfer within the rock cycle.
The Rock Cycle
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.5. Analyze and interpret weather data using maps and global weather systems to explain and communicate the relationships among air masses, pressure systems, and frontal boundaries.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.3.6. Construct an explanation from data sets to obtain and evaluate scientific information to construct scientific arguments on changes in climate caused by various natural factors (e.g., plate tectonics and continent location and Milankovitch cycles) versus anthropogenic factors (e.g., fossil fuel use and agricultural factors).
ESS.3.7. Cite evidence and develop logical arguments to identify the cause and effect relationships of the evolutionary milestones (e.g., photosynthesis and the atmosphere, the evolution of multicellular animals, the development of shells, and the colonization of terrestrial environments by plants and animals) that most profoundly shaped Earth’s systems.
ESS.3.8. Analyze and interpret the record of shared ancestry, evolution, and extinction as related to natural selection using fossils.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Earth’s Resources and Human Activity

ESS.4. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s resources and the impact of human activities.
ESS.4.1. Research, evaluate, and communicate about how human life on Earth shapes Earth’s systems and responds to the interaction of Earth’s systems (e.g., geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Examine how geochemical and ecological processes interact through time to cycle matter and energy and how human activity alters the rates of these processes.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.2. Research, assess, and communicate how Earth’s systems influence the distribution of life, including how various natural hazards and geologic events (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides, tornadoes, and hurricanes) have shaped the course of human history.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ESS.4.3. Analyze earthquake and volcanic data to determine patterns that can lead to predicting such hazards and mitigating impact to humans.

MS.ENV. Environmental Science

Natural Resources Use and Conservation

ENV.2. Students will relate the impact of human activities on the environment, conservation activities, and efforts to maintain and restore ecosystems.
ENV.2.5. Research various resources related to water quality and pollution (e.g., nonfictional text, EPA’s Surf Your Watershed, MDEQ publications) and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Human Activities and Climate Change

ENV.3. Students will discuss the direct and indirect impacts of certain types of human activities on the Earth’s climate.
ENV.3.2. Interpret data and climate models to predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation, temperature, impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).

Human Sustainability

ENV.4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of human sustainability and the environment.
ENV.4.1. Identify human impact and develop a solution for protection of the atmosphere, considering pollutants (e.g., acid rain, air pollution, smog, ozone layer, or increased levels of greenhouse gases) and the impacts of pollutants on human health (e.g., asthma, COPD, emphysema, and cancer).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.2. Evaluate data and other information to explain how key natural resources (e.g., water sources, fertile soils, concentrations of minerals, and fossil fuels), natural hazards, and climate changes influence human activity (e.g., mass migrations, human health).
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
ENV.4.4. Enrichment: Explore online resources related to air pollution to determine air quality in a geographic area and communicate the possible effects on the environment and human health.
The Atmosphere
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3

MS.FB. Foundations of Biology

Biological Evolution

FB.5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Earth’s fossil record and its indication of the diversity of life over time.
FB.5.2. Analyze and interpret data to support claims that different types of fossils provide evidence of the diversity of life that has existed on Earth and of the relationships between past and existing life on Earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Ecological Principals

FB.6. Students will understand the interdependence of living organisms and their environment.
FB.6.4. Develop and use models to discuss the climate, flora, and fauna of the terrestrial and aquatic biomes of the world.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
FB.6.7. Enrichment: Design solutions to reduce the impact of human activity on the ecosystem.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.FSL. Foundations of Science Literacy

Nature of Science

FSL.3A. Students will apply science and engineering practices and skills to scientific investigations.
FSL.3A.2. Analyze data from simple experiments and construct organized models (e.g., data tables, graphs) detailing results from the experiments.
FSL.3A.3. Demonstrate the proper use of safety procedures and scientific laboratory equipment. Select and use appropriate tools and instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data.
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3
FSL.3B. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze and interpret data found in various graphics including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3B.3. Translate information into a table, graph, or diagram. Determine patterns, trends, and relationships as the values of variables change.
FSL.3C. Students will apply scientific literacy and thinking skills to analyze scientific investigations found in various experimental designs including, but not limited to, those found in sample ACT science passages.
FSL.3C.1. Analyze the methods and choice of tools used in simple and complex experimental designs.
The Science of Physics
Worksheets :4
Lab Investigations
Worksheets :3
Lab investigations
Worksheets :3

MS.MAQI.MAQ Marine and Aquatic Science I

Water Properties and Quality

MAQI.MAQ.1. Students will develop an understanding of the unique physical and chemical properties of water and how those properties shape life on earth.
MAQI.MAQ.1.3. Diagram, utilizing digital or physical models, the water cycle and how it relates to the total amount of fresh water available to living things at any given time.
Weather I
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.1.6. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to reduce the effects of pollution in aquatic ecosystems (e.g., microplastics, garbage patches, oil spills, and eutrophication). Students will design a proposed solution based on current research and/or observations, and develop a model in order to test their design. Data from experimentation will be analyzed, organized graphically, and communicated to classmates to determine the effectiveness of the proposed solution.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Fluid Dynamics

MAQI.MAQ.2. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of fluid dynamics as it relates to both salt and freshwater systems.
MAQI.MAQ.2.1. Characterize wave features and wave properties, including wavelength, period, wave speed, breakers, and constructive waves and their effects on shoreline communities (e.g., headlands, embayments, shoreline erosion, and deposition).
Weathering and Erosion
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.3. Summarize principles related to currents (e.g., global wind patterns, Coriolis effect, Ekman spiral, surface, thermohaline, upwelling, downwelling, El Niño, La Niña, hurricanes, Barrier Island movement).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.2.4. Research, analyze, and communicate scientific arguments to support climate models that predict how global and regional climate change can affect Earth’s systems (e.g., precipitation and temperature and their associated impacts on sea level, global ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Geological Features

MAQI.MAQ.3. Students will understand the principles of plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, and physical features of oceanic zones.
MAQI.MAQ.3.1. Use geospatial data to analyze, explain, and communicate differences among the major geological features of specific aquatic ecosystems (e.g., plate tectonics, continental rise, continental slope, abyssal plain, trenches, sea mounts, island formation, and watersheds).
MAQI.MAQ.3.2. Develop an understanding of plate tectonics to predict certain geological features (e.g., sea floor spreading, paleomagnetic measurements, and orogenesis).
MAQI.MAQ.3.4. Classify zones of freshwater sources based on the velocity of current, depth, and temperature.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

Flora and Fauna

MAQI.MAQ.4. Students will examine characteristics of specific aquatic ecosystems and the effects of human and natural phenomena on those ecosystems.
MAQI.MAQ.4.1. Compare and contrast the unique biotic and abiotic characteristics of the following selected aquatic ecosystems: intertidal zone, wetlands/estuaries, coral reef, barrier islands, continental slope/shelf, abyss, rivers/streams/watersheds, and lakes/ponds.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.4. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the aquatic ecosystems’ biodiversity (e.g., land use changes, erosion and sedimentation, over-fishing, invasive/exotic species, and pollution).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.5. Explore the importance of species diversity to the biological resources needed by human populations, including food (e.g., aquaculture and mariculture), medicine, and natural aesthetics.
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of natural phenomena (e.g., hurricanes, floods, drought, and sea-level rise) on the aquatic ecosystems.
Weather II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
MAQI.MAQ.4.8. Enrichment: Choose an environmental issue that currently exists in one of the aquatic ecosystems and use an engineering design process to propose and develop a possible solution using scientific knowledge and best management practices (BMPs). Create an environmental action plan to include moral, legal, societal, political, and economic decisions that impact animal diversity in both the short and long term. Results from developed plans will be communicated with classmates.

MS.PHS. Physical Science

Newton’s Laws of Motion

PHS.5. Students will analyze the scientific principles of motion, force, and work.
PHS.5.1. Research the scientific contributions of Newton, and use models to communicate Newton’s principles.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHS.5.2. Design and conduct an investigation to study the motion of an object using properties such as displacement, time of motion, velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHS.5.3. Collect, organize, and interpret graphical data using correct metric units to determine the average speed of an object.
PHS.5.7. Use mathematical and computational representations to create graphs and formulas that describe the relationships between force, work, and energy (i.e., W=Fd, KE=½ mv^2, PE=mgh, W=KE).

Waves

PHS.6. Students will explore the characteristics of waves.
PHS.6.2. Analyze examples and evidence of transverse and longitudinal waves found in nature (e.g., earthquakes, ocean waves, and sound waves).
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.3. Generate wave models to explore energy transference.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.6. Research real-world applications to create models or visible representations of the electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light, infrared radiation, and ultraviolet radiation.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHS.6.7. Enrichment: Use an engineering design process to design and construct an apparatus that forms images to project on a screen or magnify images using lenses and/or mirrors.
Optics
Worksheets :3

Energy

PHS.7. Students will examine different forms of energy and energy transformations.
PHS.7.1. Using digital resources, explore forms of energy (e.g., potential and kinetic energy, mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, radiant, and nuclear energy).
PHS.7.3. Using mathematical and computational analysis, calculate potential and kinetic energy based on given data. Use equations such as PE=mgh and KE=½ mv^2.

Electricity

PHS.9. Students will explore basic principles of magnetism and electricity (e.g., static electricity, current electricity, and circuits).
PHS.9.1. Use digital resources and online simulations to investigate the basic principles of electricity, including static electricity, current electricity, and circuits. Use digital resources (e.g., online simulations) to build a model showing the relationship between magnetic fields and electric currents.
PHS.9.4. Use an engineering design process to construct and test conductors, semiconductors, and insulators using various materials to optimize efficiency.
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3

MS.PHY. Physics

One-Dimensional Motion

PHY.1. Students will investigate and understand how to analyze and interpret data.
PHY.1.1. Investigate and analyze evidence gained through observation or experimental design regarding the one-dimensional (1-D) motion of objects. Design and conduct experiments to generate and interpret graphical evidence of distance, velocity, and acceleration through motion.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.1.2. Interpret and predict 1-D motion based on displacement vs. time, velocity vs. time, or acceleration vs. time graphs (e.g., free-falling objects).
PHY.1.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to solve problems using kinematic equations.
PHY.1.4. Use graphical analysis to derive kinematic equations.
PHY.1.5. Differentiate and give examples of motion concepts such as distance-displacement, speed-velocity, and acceleration.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.1.6. Design and mathematically/graphically analyze quantitative data to explore displacement, velocity, and acceleration of various objects. Use probe systems, video analysis, graphical analysis software, digital spreadsheets, and/or online simulations.
PHY.1.7. Design different scenarios, and predict graph shapes for distance/time, velocity/time, and acceleration/time graphs.
PHY.1.8. Given a 1D motion graph students should replicate the motion predicted by the graph.

Newton’s Laws

PHY.2. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to Newtonian dynamics.
PHY.2.1. Identify forces acting on a system by applying Newton’s laws mathematically and graphically (e.g., vector and scalar quantities).
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.4. Use vectors and mathematical analysis to explore the 2D motion of objects (i.e., projectile and circular motion).
PHY.2.5. Use mathematical and computational analysis to derive simple equations of motion for various systems using Newton’s second law (e.g. net force equations).
PHY.2.6. Use mathematical and computational analysis to explore forces (e.g., friction, force applied, normal, and tension).
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.7. Analyze real-world applications to draw conclusions about Newton’s three laws of motion using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Laws of Motion - Set II
Worksheets :3
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
PHY.2.10. Apply the effects of the universal gravitation law to generate a digital/physical graph, and interpret the forces between two masses, acceleration due to gravity, and planetary motion (e.g., situations where g is constant, as in falling bodies).
PHY.2.11. Explain centripetal acceleration while undergoing uniform circular motion to explore Kepler’s third law using online simulations, models, and/or probe systems.

Work and Energy

PHY.3. Students will develop an understanding of concepts related to work and energy.
PHY.3.3. Through real-world applications, draw conclusions about mechanical potential energy and kinetic energy using online simulations and/or laboratory experiences.

Waves

PHY.4. Students will investigate and explore wave properties.
PHY.4.1. Analyze the characteristics and properties of simple harmonic motions, sound, and light.
Forces - Set I
Worksheets :4
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.5. Design, investigate, and collect data on standing waves and waves in specific media (e.g., stretched string, water surface, and air) using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.9. Research the different bands of electromagnetic radiation, including characteristics, properties, and similarities/differences.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4
PHY.4.12. Enrichment: Research uses of the electromagnetic spectrum or photoelectric effect.
Vibrations and Waves
Vibration is the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4

Electricity and Magnetism

PHY.5. Students will investigate the key components of electricity and magnetism.
PHY.5.1. Analyze and explain electricity and the relationship between electricity and magnetism.
PHY.5.2. Explore the characteristics of static charge and how a static charge is generated using simulations.
PHY.5.3. Use mathematical and computational analysis to analyze problems dealing with electric field, electric potential, current, voltage, and resistance as related to Ohm’s law.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
PHY.5.4. Develop and use models (e.g., circuit drawing and mathematical representation) to explain how electric circuits work by tracing the path of electrons, including concepts of energy transformation, transfer, conservation of energy, electric charge, and resistance using online simulations, probe systems, and/or laboratory experiences.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.6. Use schematic diagrams to analyze the current flow in series and parallel electric circuits, given the component resistances and the imposed electric potential.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4
Modern Electronics
Worksheets :3
PHY.5.9. Enrichment: Design and draw a schematic of a circuit that will turn on/off a light from two locations in a room like those found in most homes.
Electric Circuits
Worksheets :4

MS.ZI.ZOO. Zoology I

Evolution

ZI.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZI.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Phyla Porifera and Cnidaria

ZI.ZOO.2. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Porifera and phylum Cnidaria and how each adapts to their environments.
ZI.ZOO.2.9. Describe the ecological importance of and human impacts on coral reefs.
Rocks I
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Rocks II
Worksheets :3Vocabulary :3
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3

MS.ZII.ZOO. Zoology II

Evolution

ZII.ZOO.1. Students will develop a model of evolutionary change over time.
ZII.ZOO.1.2. Describe how the fossil record documents the history of life on earth.
Fossils I
Worksheets :4
Fossils II
Worksheets :3

Phylum Chordata, Classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes

ZII.ZOO.7. Students will understand the structure and function of phylum Chordata, classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, and how they demonstrate the characteristics of living things.
ZII.ZOO.7.6. Research, analyze, and communicate the effects of urbanization and continued expansion by humans on the biodiversity of fish species (e.g., overfishing and invasive species).
Oceans
Worksheets :4Vocabulary :3
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