Washington Standards for Second Grade Science

Animals
FreeThere are many different kinds of animals. The five main groups of animals are: Fish, birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Did you know... 2nd Grade
Gas is all around us. There is a layer of gas that surrounds Earth, which is called the atmosphere. Scientists who study the weather are called meteorologists. Some plants like ferns do not have flowers. They make new plants using spores instead of seeds. The cheetah is the fastest animal in the world. Cheetahs can run up to about 113 kilometers per hour. The arctic is the coldest habitat. Brrrr! Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Earth yesterday and today
Life on Earth Has Changed. Many kinds of animals that used to live on Earth are no longer living. They are extinct. Reasons for Extinction: Big changes in the climate. Many times animals could not handle these big changes in the weather. Good news: Many animals have adapted to many changes that happen on Earth so that they CAN survive and NOT become extinct! Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Fossils and dinosaurs
Many animals have lived on Earth and many still live on the Earth. Some lived on Earth millions of year ago. Many of these animals unfortunately do not live on Earth anymore. Fossils are things that provide evidence (or proof) of things that lived long ago. A fossil is the outline or piece of something that died millions of years ago. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
How do plants and animals live together?
Plants need air, water, sunlight, and room to grow in order to live. Animals need air, water, food, and shelter in order to live. What is a Shelter? It’s a safe place for an animal! Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Magnets
What Is a Magnet? A magnet attracts certain kinds of metal. Attract means to pull towards. If something is magnetic, that means it is attracted by a magnet. Magnets come in different shapes and sizes. Magnets are used most every day. Example: You may have magnets on your refrigerator to hang up pictures and notes. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Mammals and birds
What are Birds? Birds are warm-blooded animals that have: wings, feathers, a beak, no teeth, bones. Birds lay eggs. Their young hatch from those eggs. What Are Mammals? Mammals are animals that have hair. Mammals are the only animals with hair. Mammals are also warm-blooded. This means their body temperature stays the same, even if it is very cold or hot outside. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Math in Science
Charts and Graphs. Studying Plants. Studying Animals. Studying Water Habitats, Studying How Living Things Grow and Change. Studying Energy Needs. Studying Earth's Weather. Studying the Sun and the Earth. Studying the Moon, Stars, and Planets. Studying Earth, Yesterday and Today. Using and Saving Natural Resources. Hands-on Lab Skills. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Moon, star and planets
The moon moves around the Earth. A star is a hot ball of gas, stars give off light. The Sun is a star. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Reptiles, amphibians and fish
Reptiles have scales. Reptiles are born on land. Reptiles are cold-blooded which means their bodies change temperatures with the outside temperature around them. Reptiles lay eggs, and their babies hatch from those eggs. All amphibians begin their life in water with gills. As they grow, they develop lungs – which is what they use to breathe with on land. They grow legs to use on land too. Fish use gills to breathe. A fish stays in the water for its entire life! Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Rocks, Soil and water
What are Rocks? Rocks are solid objects found in nature. Rocks are made up of minerals. What is Soil? Soil is the loose material the covers much of the Earth. Soil is also nonliving. Soil can be made of clay, sand, and humus. All living things need WATER to survive and to grow. The movement and recycling of the Earth’s water is called the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 2
Science in our world
What is Technology? Technology is using science in order to solve different problems. Technology uses things we know about science to make tools for people to make doing work easier. Technology can be as simple as a hammer. Technology keeps us safe (in our houses, our cars). Technology supplies us with the things we need to live. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
The sun and earth
The Sun is a large hot ball of gas. It is also a star. The Sun gives Earth light and heat. Living things need the Sun to live! Sun rays shine on the moon at night which makes the moon bright! The Earth is the third planet from the Sun. There are four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1
Using and saving natural resources
Natural resources are found on the Earth and are important to living things. People, plants, and animals need air to live. Air is a natural resource that never runs out! Water is another natural resource that people and animals use – they drink water in order to survive. Plants also need water to grow. Some natural resources are renewable. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1Vocabulary Sets: 1

WA.1. Systems (SYS)

2-3.SYS. Role of Each Part in a System

2-3.SYSA. Students know that a system is a group of interacting parts that form a whole.
2-3.SYSA.1. Students are expected to give examples of simple living and physical systems (e.g., a whole animal or plant, a car, a doll, a table and chair set). For each example, explain how different parts make up the whole.
Where plants and animals live
An environment is everything that surrounds a living thing or person. Everything that lives on Earth lives in a certain environment. Living things get everything they need to survive from their environment. An environment also includes nonliving things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 3rd grade
There are so many amazing scientific facts out there, waiting to be discovered by you! Check out some of the incredible ‘Did You Know? facts that have to do with many of the science topics you learn about in 3rd Grade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2-3.SYSB. Students know that a whole object, plant, or animal may not continue to function the same way if some of its parts are missing.
2-3.SYSB.2. Students are expected to explain how the parts of a system depend on one another for the system to function.
Where plants and animals live
An environment is everything that surrounds a living thing or person. Everything that lives on Earth lives in a certain environment. Living things get everything they need to survive from their environment. An environment also includes nonliving things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 3rd grade
There are so many amazing scientific facts out there, waiting to be discovered by you! Check out some of the incredible ‘Did You Know? facts that have to do with many of the science topics you learn about in 3rd Grade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2-3.SYSC. Students know that a whole object, plant, or animal can do things that none of its parts can do by themselves.
2-3.SYSC.1. Students are expected to contrast the function of a whole object, plant, or animal with the function of one of its parts (e.g., an airplane can fly, but wings and propeller alone cannot; plants can grow, but stems and flowers alone cannot).
Main Parts of Plants
A plant has many important parts, such as its roots, stem, leaves, and flower. Each part of a plant has many functions that make it possible for a plant to live. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How do plants grow?
Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
All about plants
What do plants need to grow? A plant needs: water, air, sunlight and room. How does a plant grow? A seed comes from an adult plant and falls to the ground. Once in the ground, a seed begins to grow in the soil. Roots grow from a seed down into the ground. A young plant grows up through the soil. Parts of a Plant: Roots, Stem, Leaves, Flower. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
All about animals
What Do Animals Need to Live? Animals need to: drink water, eat food, breathe air. Animals also need shelter. How do Animals Get Food? How do Different Animals Breath? Animals Grow and Change. How do Animals Stay Safe? Animal Body Parts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Animal groups
A MAMMAL is an animal. A REPTILE is an animal. An AMPHIBIAN is an animal. Worms are animals too! Insects – bugs! Insects are part of the animal family too! Some animals have four legs. Some animals have two legs. Animals have different coverings on their bodies. Some animals have fur… Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Plants
What are the Parts of a Plant? Let’s go from the bottom to the top: ROOTS, STEM, LEAVES, FLOWERS. Who Needs Plants? EVERYONE! Plants give off a gas called oxygen which is what we (and animals) need to breathe in to live. A plant's life cycle is how long a plant lives or how long it takes to grow, flower, and make seeds. All plants need water, air, and warm temperatures to grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
2-3.SYSE. Students know that similar parts may play different roles in different objects, plants, or animals.
2-3.SYSE.1. Students are expected to identify ways that similar parts can play different roles in different systems (e.g., birds may use their beaks to crack seeds while other birds use their beaks to catch fish).
Main Parts of Plants
A plant has many important parts, such as its roots, stem, leaves, and flower. Each part of a plant has many functions that make it possible for a plant to live. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How do plants grow?
Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
All about plants
What do plants need to grow? A plant needs: water, air, sunlight and room. How does a plant grow? A seed comes from an adult plant and falls to the ground. Once in the ground, a seed begins to grow in the soil. Roots grow from a seed down into the ground. A young plant grows up through the soil. Parts of a Plant: Roots, Stem, Leaves, Flower. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
All about animals
What Do Animals Need to Live? Animals need to: drink water, eat food, breathe air. Animals also need shelter. How do Animals Get Food? How do Different Animals Breath? Animals Grow and Change. How do Animals Stay Safe? Animal Body Parts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Animal groups
A MAMMAL is an animal. A REPTILE is an animal. An AMPHIBIAN is an animal. Worms are animals too! Insects – bugs! Insects are part of the animal family too! Some animals have four legs. Some animals have two legs. Animals have different coverings on their bodies. Some animals have fur… Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Plants
What are the Parts of a Plant? Let’s go from the bottom to the top: ROOTS, STEM, LEAVES, FLOWERS. Who Needs Plants? EVERYONE! Plants give off a gas called oxygen which is what we (and animals) need to breathe in to live. A plant's life cycle is how long a plant lives or how long it takes to grow, flower, and make seeds. All plants need water, air, and warm temperatures to grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

WA.2. Inquiry (INQ)

2-3.INQ. Conducting Investigations: In prior grades students learned that scientific investigations involve trying to answer questions by making observations or trying things out. In grades 2-3 students learn to conduct different kinds of investigations. Although students may not yet be able to plan investigations alone, they can carry out investigations in collaboration with other students and support from the teacher. Actions may include observing and describing objects, events, and organisms, classifying them and making and recording measurements. Students should also display their data using various tables and graphs, make inferences based on evidence, and discuss their results with other students.

2-3 INQB. Investigate: Students know that a scientific investigation may include making and following a plan to accurately observe and describe objects, events, and organisms; make and record measurements, and predict outcomes.
2-3 INQB.1. Students are expected to work with other students to make and follow a plan to carry out a scientific investigation. Actions may include accurately observing and describing objects, events, and organisms; measuring and recording data; and predicting outcomes.
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry - 3rd grade
Science Process Skills: Observing, Classifying, Estimating, Predicting/Hypothesis, Making Inferences, Models, Investigating, Collecting Data, Interpreting Data. Scientific Method: Ask a question, Write an Hypothesis, Create a control variable, Conduct an Experiment, Record Your Data, Decide Your Final Answer, State Your Final Answer. Science Tools. Safety in Science. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
Scientists use MANY different tools while they are observing and conducting experiments. Here are some tools scientists use: RULER, MEASURING CUP, CLOCK, HAND, LENS, THERMOMETER, BALANCE. Scientists often put objects into piles or groups based on their color, shape, texture, size and weight. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3 INQD. Investigate: Students know that simple instruments, such as magnifiers, thermometers, and rulers provide more information than scientists can obtain using only their unaided senses.
2-3 INQD.1. Students are expected to use simple instruments (e.g., metric scales or balances, thermometers, and rulers) to observe and make measurements, and record and display data in a table, bar graph, line plot, or pictograph.
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry - 3rd grade
Science Process Skills: Observing, Classifying, Estimating, Predicting/Hypothesis, Making Inferences, Models, Investigating, Collecting Data, Interpreting Data. Scientific Method: Ask a question, Write an Hypothesis, Create a control variable, Conduct an Experiment, Record Your Data, Decide Your Final Answer, State Your Final Answer. Science Tools. Safety in Science. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
Scientists use MANY different tools while they are observing and conducting experiments. Here are some tools scientists use: RULER, MEASURING CUP, CLOCK, HAND, LENS, THERMOMETER, BALANCE. Scientists often put objects into piles or groups based on their color, shape, texture, size and weight. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
What is science?
Science is the study of the world around us. Scientists study the world around us. When studying things like plants, animals, and rocks, scientists use their senses: Eyes - to see. Nose - to smell. Ears - to hear. Hands - to touch. Mouth - to taste. Scientists study many things – like the things YOU study in 2nd grade: plants, rocks, weather, fossils, solar system, animals. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

WA.3. Application (APP)

2-3.APP. Solving Problems: In earlier grades, students learned to use simple tools and materials to solve problems in creative ways. In grades 2-3 students develop the ability to design a solution to a simple problem, using an elementary version of the technological design process. They also increase their abilities to use tools and materials to design and build something that solves a problem. Students can apply these abilities in their daily lives.

2-3.APPB. Students know that scientific ideas and discoveries can be applied to solving problems.
2-3.APPB.1. Give an example in which the application of scientific knowledge helps solve a problem (e.g., use electric lights to see at night).
Science in our world
Science is used every day to make this world a great place to live! People use science to invent and create technology. Tools help us do different jobs and make the job easier to do. Technology we use to communicate with others: telephone, cell phone, computer/Internet. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

WA.4. Earth and Space Science

ES2. Earth Systems, Structures, and Processes

2-3.ES2. Water and Weather: In prior years, students learned about Earth materials through their own observations. In grades 2-3 students learn that water exists in various locations and plays an essential role in Earth systems, including shaping land forms and weather. Weather changes from day to day, and weather conditions can be described by measurable quantities, such as temperature and rainfall. Environments can be affected by natural causes. Some of these changes are gradual and some are rapid. Water is essential for life, but it can also be destructive when too much is deposited too rapidly.
2-3.ES2A. Students know that water plays an essential role in Earth systems, including shaping landforms.
2-3.ES2A.1. Students are expected to identify where natural water bodies occur in the students' local environment.
Changes on earth
A glacier is a slow moving large body of ice. A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s crust from which hot, melted rock forcefully comes out when pressure is built up inside the Earth. An earthquake is a sudden shift in the Earth’s crust that causes the ground to shake and vibrate violently. Weathering is the process of rocks being changed over time by conditions such as rain, snow, ice, pressure.Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
2-3.ES2B. Students know that water can be a liquid or solid and can go back and forth from one form to another. If water is turned into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water will be the same as it was before freezing. Water occurs in the air as rain, snow, hail, fog, and clouds.
2-3.ES2B.1. Students are expected to describe the various forms and places that water can be found on Earth as liquids and solids (e.g., as liquid in morning dew; in lakes, streams, and oceans; as solid ice at the North and South Poles, and on the tops of mountains; and in the air as clouds, fog, rain, hail, and snow).
Science Worksheets: Water.
All living things need water to survive and to grow. For example, plants need water to make their own food, while fish need to live in water. The human body is made up of about 2/3 water. Water comes in three forms: liquid, solid, and gas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Changes on earth
A glacier is a slow moving large body of ice. A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s crust from which hot, melted rock forcefully comes out when pressure is built up inside the Earth. An earthquake is a sudden shift in the Earth’s crust that causes the ground to shake and vibrate violently. Weathering is the process of rocks being changed over time by conditions such as rain, snow, ice, pressure.Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Weather
When someone asks, “What is the weather today?” you know what they are asking. They are asking what it is like outside. They want to know what nature is doing in your area – raining, snowing, blowing… How We Measure Weather: We measure temperature using a thermometer. A wind vane measures the direction of the wind. A rain gauge measures how much rain falls.Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth's weather and seasons
What is Weather? Weather is what it feels like outside right now: hot, cold, windy, wet... There are Four Seasons: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. Seasons always come in the same order every year. Each season brings different weather. Winter is the coldest season and summer is the warmest. Some Kinds of Bad Weather: A thunderstorm, A blizzard, A hurricane. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3
2-3.ES2C. Students know that weather changes from day to day and over the seasons. Weather can be described by measurable quantities, such as temperature and precipitation.
2-3.ES2C.1. Students are expected to measure and record changes in weather (e.g., inches of rain using a rain gauge, depth of snow using a ruler, and temperature using a thermometer).
Weather
What is the weather like outside? Weather is the condition of the air outside. Weather involves many things, such as clouds, temperature, water in the air, and the wind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Weather
When someone asks, “What is the weather today?” you know what they are asking. They are asking what it is like outside. They want to know what nature is doing in your area – raining, snowing, blowing… How We Measure Weather: We measure temperature using a thermometer. A wind vane measures the direction of the wind. A rain gauge measures how much rain falls.Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Earth's weather and seasons
What is Weather? Weather is what it feels like outside right now: hot, cold, windy, wet... There are Four Seasons: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. Seasons always come in the same order every year. Each season brings different weather. Winter is the coldest season and summer is the warmest. Some Kinds of Bad Weather: A thunderstorm, A blizzard, A hurricane. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How Does the Earth's Surface Change?
Earth Structure and Processes Read more...iWorksheets :2Vocabulary :3

WA.4. Life Science

LS1. Structures and Functions of Living Organisms

2-3.LS1. Life Cycles: In prior grades students learned that living things have basic needs and they meet those needs in various ways. In grades 2-3 students learn that all plants and animals have life cycles. They also compare the life cycles of a few common animals to see how they are similar and how they are different, and learn about the life cycles of plants. Focus should be on observable characteristics of how plants and animals change over time. An important aspect of life cycles is that plants and animals resemble their parents. This is a first step in understanding how the structures of plants and animals develop and function.
2-3.LS1A. Students know that plants have life cycles that include sprouting, growing to full size, forming fruits and flowers, shedding seeds (which begins a new cycle), and eventually dying. The details of the life cycle are different for different plants.
2-3.LS1A.1. Students are expected to describe the life cycle of a common type of plant (e.g., the growth of a fast-growing plant from seed to sprout, to adult, to fruits, flowers, and seeds).
How do plants grow?
Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Plants
What are the Parts of a Plant? Let’s go from the bottom to the top: ROOTS, STEM, LEAVES, FLOWERS. Who Needs Plants? EVERYONE! Plants give off a gas called oxygen which is what we (and animals) need to breathe in to live. A plant's life cycle is how long a plant lives or how long it takes to grow, flower, and make seeds. All plants need water, air, and warm temperatures to grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2
2-3.LS1B. Students know that animals have life cycles that include being born; developing into juveniles, adolescents, then adults; reproducing (which begins a new cycle); and eventually dying. The details of the life cycle are different for different animals.
2-3.LS1B.1. Students are expected to describe the life cycle of a common type of animal (e.g., the development of a butterfly or moth from egg to larva to pupa to adult, or the development of a frog from egg to tadpole to adult frog).
How animals grow and change and live
Animals have certain traits which help them survive in their environment. These survival traits are called adaptations. Many adaptations are inherited, which means they are passed on from the parents of animal. Many animals have adaptations for eating such as the way a bird’s beak is shaped. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
How living things grow and change?
What are living things? Living things are alive! Plants, animals, and people are living things. Living things can grow. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Life Cycles of Plants and Animals
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :2

LS2. Ecosystems

2-3.LS2. Changes in Ecosystems: In prior grades students learned that all plants and animals live in and depend on habitats. In grades 2-3 students learn that ecosystems include plant and animal populations as well as nonliving resources. Plants and animals depend both on each other and on the nonliving resources in their ecosystem to survive. Ecosystems can change through both natural causes and human activities. These changes might be good or bad for the plants and animals that live in the ecosystem, or have no effect. Humans can protect the health of ecosystems in a number of ways.
2-3.LS2A. Students know that ecosystems support all life on the planet, including human life, by providing food, fresh water, and breathable air.
2-3.LS2A.1. Students are expected to identify at least four ways that ecosystems support life (e.g., by providing fresh water, generating oxygen, removing toxic pollutants, and providing sources of useful materials).
Where plants and animals live
An environment is everything that surrounds a living thing or person. Everything that lives on Earth lives in a certain environment. Living things get everything they need to survive from their environment. An environment also includes nonliving things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 1st Grade
Air is a nonliving thing. The air we breathe in is called oxygen. Herbivores are animals that only eat plants. Can you believe a HUGE dinosaur called a brachiosaurus was an herbivore? A whale is NOT a fish. It is a mammal that lives in the ocean. You have almost 10,000 taste buds in your mouth! These taste buds help you TASTE food. You can taste things that are sweet, sour, salty, and bitter! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Land Habitats
What is a habitat? A habitat is the place where plants and animals live. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Water Habitats
We already know that a habitat is the place where plants and animals live. Now, let’s look at WATER habitats... Water covers nearly 75% of the Earth: which means there is a lot more water than land on Earth! Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

WA.4. Physical Science

PS1. Force and Motion

2-3.PS1. Force Makes Things Move: In prior grades students learned to use appropriate words to describe the position and motion of objects and the effects of forces on objects. In grades 2-3 students learn that forces work not only to push and pull objects, but also affect objects when they are dropped or thrown. Whenever the motion of an object changes, there is a force involved. Greater forces on a given object result in greater changes of motion. In addition to being able to describe how forces change the motion of objects, students are expected to measure the position of objects using measuring instruments such as rulers. Students can also measure time to the nearest minute. Emphasis should be on comparisons of forces and motions rather than on calculation so that students develop conceptual understanding of how forces make things move.
2-3.PS1A. Students know that motion can be described as a change in position over a period of time.
2-3.PS1A.1. Students are expected to give an example to illustrate motion as a change in position over a period of time (e.g., if a student stands near the door and then moves to his/her seat, the student is "in motion" during that time).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force and motion
What Makes Things Move? Forces make things move! A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Gravity is a force! Gravity is a force that pulls things down. Speed is how fast or how slow an object moves. Objects can move straight, up, down, to the left, or to the right. Objects can curve and swerve when they move too! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 1st Grade
Air is a nonliving thing. The air we breathe in is called oxygen. Herbivores are animals that only eat plants. Can you believe a HUGE dinosaur called a brachiosaurus was an herbivore? A whale is NOT a fish. It is a mammal that lives in the ocean. You have almost 10,000 taste buds in your mouth! These taste buds help you TASTE food. You can taste things that are sweet, sour, salty, and bitter! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
2-3.PS1B. Students know that there is always a force involved when something starts moving or changes its speed or direction of motion.
2-3.PS1B.1. Students are expected to identify the force that starts something moving or changes its speed or direction of motion (e.g., when a ball is thrown or when a rock is dropped).
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Force and motion
What Makes Things Move? Forces make things move! A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Gravity is a force! Gravity is a force that pulls things down. Speed is how fast or how slow an object moves. Objects can move straight, up, down, to the left, or to the right. Objects can curve and swerve when they move too! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 1st Grade
Air is a nonliving thing. The air we breathe in is called oxygen. Herbivores are animals that only eat plants. Can you believe a HUGE dinosaur called a brachiosaurus was an herbivore? A whale is NOT a fish. It is a mammal that lives in the ocean. You have almost 10,000 taste buds in your mouth! These taste buds help you TASTE food. You can taste things that are sweet, sour, salty, and bitter! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

PS2. Matter: Properties and Change

2-3.PS2. Properties of Materials: In prior grades students learned about liquids and solids. In grades 2-3 students learn to identify different physical properties of materials (matter) and to realize that an object may be made from several different types of materials. They also learn that properties of materials change when environmental conditions change. Water, for example, changes to a solid when the temperature drops below 0 degrees Celsius. Although few students at this age will fully understand that water may change to an invisible gas (e.g., water vapor) when left in an open container overnight, they can start to become familiar with changes of state by observing ice cubes freeze and then melt, and seeing water turn to steam when heated. Looking closely at matter to describe its characteristics will eventually lead to understanding the basic nature of matter and its physical and chemical properties.
2-3.PS2A. Students know that objects have properties, including size, weight, hardness, color, shape, texture, and magnetism. Unknown substances can sometimes be identified by their properties.
2-3.PS2A.1. Students are expected to list several properties of an object.
Describe and measure matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
Scientists use MANY different tools while they are observing and conducting experiments. Here are some tools scientists use: RULER, MEASURING CUP, CLOCK, HAND, LENS, THERMOMETER, BALANCE. Scientists often put objects into piles or groups based on their color, shape, texture, size and weight. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2B. Students know that an object may be made from different materials. These materials give the object certain properties.
2-3.PS2B.1. Students are expected to list properties of common materials.
Describe and measure matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on Lab Skills/Science Inquiry
Scientists use MANY different tools while they are observing and conducting experiments. Here are some tools scientists use: RULER, MEASURING CUP, CLOCK, HAND, LENS, THERMOMETER, BALANCE. Scientists often put objects into piles or groups based on their color, shape, texture, size and weight. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2B.3. Students are expected to compare two objects made of the same material but a different shape (e.g., a plastic fork and a plastic spoon) and identify which of their properties are similar and different.
Describe and measure matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Hands-on lab skills/Science Inquiry
Predictions Based on Patterns. Scientists often make predictions based on all the things they already know are true. Predict means to tell what you think is going to happen. Scientists then test their predictions to see if they are right! Scientists often compare and sort objects based on color, shape, texture, size and weight. Scientists use a METER STICK to measure the length of an object. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2C. Students know that water changes state (solid, liquid, gas) when the temperature of the water changes.
2-3.PS2C.1. Students are expected to predict what will happen to a sample of liquid water if it is put into a freezer (it will turn to ice) and if it is put into a pan and heated on the stove (it will turn to steam or water vapor).
Comparing matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Mass is the amount of matter in an object. It is how much stuff an object is made of. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2D. Students know that the amount of water and other liquids left in an open container will decrease over time, but the amount of liquid in a closed container will not change.
2-3.PS2D.1. Students are expected to predict what will happen to a small quantity of water left in an open container overnight.
Comparing matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Mass is the amount of matter in an object. It is how much stuff an object is made of. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2D.2. Students are expected to predict what will happen to the same quantity of water left in a closed container overnight.
Comparing matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Mass is the amount of matter in an object. It is how much stuff an object is made of. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
2-3.PS2D.3. Students are expected to explain where the liquid water goes when the amount decreases over time.
Comparing matter
What is matter? Matter is all around you. Matter is anything that takes up space. Mass is the amount of matter in an object. It is how much stuff an object is made of. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1

PS3. Energy: Transfer, Transformation, and Conservation

2-3.PS3. Forms of Energy: Students learn to identify several different forms of energy. Children in this age range have an intuitive understanding of energy concepts. For example, energy is needed to get things done; humans get energy from food. It is possible to build on these ideas by having the students explore different energy phenomena.
2-3.PS3A. Students know that heat, light, motion, electricity, and sound are all forms of energy.
2-3.PS3A.1. Students are expected to use the word energy to explain everyday activities (e.g., food gives people energy to play games).
Energy
Energy is the ability to do work. There are two types of energy. One type of energy is energy that is waiting to happen but has not happened yet. This is called potential energy. Another type of energy is called kinetic energy. This type of energy is energy that is happening now. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
All about heat and energy
FreeEnergy is the ability to do work. The sun is the main source of earth's heat and light energy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Energy needs
What is Energy? Energy is the ability to do work. Energy is what allows living things and objects to do things. Different Kinds of Energy are: Heat Energy, Energy of Motion, Light Energy, Sound Energy, Electricity or Electrical Energy. Some Sources of Energy are: The Sun, A candle, A stove, Food. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4
2-3.PS3A.2. Students are expected to give examples of different forms of energy as observed in everyday life: light, sound, and motion.
Energy
Energy is the ability to do work. There are two types of energy. One type of energy is energy that is waiting to happen but has not happened yet. This is called potential energy. Another type of energy is called kinetic energy. This type of energy is energy that is happening now. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
All about heat and energy
FreeEnergy is the ability to do work. The sun is the main source of earth's heat and light energy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Energy needs
What is Energy? Energy is the ability to do work. Energy is what allows living things and objects to do things. Different Kinds of Energy are: Heat Energy, Energy of Motion, Light Energy, Sound Energy, Electricity or Electrical Energy. Some Sources of Energy are: The Sun, A candle, A stove, Food. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4
2-3.PS3A.3. Students are expected to explain how light, sound, and motions are all energy.
Forces and motion-how things move
Motion is the process of an object changing place or position. Position refers to an object's location. The position of an object all depends on how a person is looking at the object and what it us being compared to, which is known as an object's relative position. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Energy
Energy is the ability to do work. There are two types of energy. One type of energy is energy that is waiting to happen but has not happened yet. This is called potential energy. Another type of energy is called kinetic energy. This type of energy is energy that is happening now. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Sound
Sound is energy that travels in a wave that is caused by vibrations. Vibrations are movements made rapidly back and forth. Vibrations travel through the air and into your ear. You hear sounds when vibrating air causes your eardrum to vibrate. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
All about heat and energy
FreeEnergy is the ability to do work. The sun is the main source of earth's heat and light energy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Force and motion
What Makes Things Move? Forces make things move! A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Gravity is a force! Gravity is a force that pulls things down. Speed is how fast or how slow an object moves. Objects can move straight, up, down, to the left, or to the right. Objects can curve and swerve when they move too! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Light and sound
Where Does Light Come From? Light is brightness that comes from an object like a flashlight, a candle, a light bulb, or the Sun. How is Sound Made? Sound is made because of something vibrating. Vibrate means to move back and forth really fast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Did you Know... 1st Grade
Air is a nonliving thing. The air we breathe in is called oxygen. Herbivores are animals that only eat plants. Can you believe a HUGE dinosaur called a brachiosaurus was an herbivore? A whale is NOT a fish. It is a mammal that lives in the ocean. You have almost 10,000 taste buds in your mouth! These taste buds help you TASTE food. You can taste things that are sweet, sour, salty, and bitter! Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Energy needs
What is Energy? Energy is the ability to do work. Energy is what allows living things and objects to do things. Different Kinds of Energy are: Heat Energy, Energy of Motion, Light Energy, Sound Energy, Electricity or Electrical Energy. Some Sources of Energy are: The Sun, A candle, A stove, Food. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Objects in motion
What is force? A force is a push or pull that can make something move. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
All about sound and light
How is Sound Made? Sound is made because of something vibrating. You hear sounds when vibrating air causes your eardrum to vibrate. How Are Sounds Different? How Does Sound Travel? How Do People and Animals Make Sounds? What is Light? Light is also a form of energy. Light is energy that travels at very high speeds. Where Does Light Come From? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
All About Energy
Worksheets :2Vocabulary :4