Wisconsin Academic Standards for First Grade English Language Arts

Capitalizing I
What does Capitalizing ‘I’ Mean? I is a special pronoun that takes the place of your own name. Your own name always begins with a capital, so when you are talking about yourself you use capital I. But you do not need a capital m when you call yourself me. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Complete Sentences
A complete sentence is a group of words in speaking order. The words tell a complete idea. They tell the whole idea. A complete sentence tells who or what the idea is about. It also tells what happens. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Compound Words
What is a Compound Word? A Compound Word is a word that is composed of two or more separate words. Examples: sea + shell = seashell, basket + ball = basketball. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Contractions
What is a Contraction? A contraction is really two words squeezed together to make a new word. Some of the letters from one or both of the words go away and a special mark called an apostrophe goes in their place. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
High Frequency Words II
What are High Frequency Words? These are words you need to know at sight. That means you read them without trying to sound them out. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
High Frequency Words I
FreeHigh frequency words are the sight words you need to know as soon as you see them. Good readers do not need to sound them out. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Rhyming Words
Rhyming words have the same vowel sound and the same ending sounds. Examples: hat - bat - cat. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Three Step Directions
What is Logical Order? Logical order is how things happen in real life. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1

WI.CC.1.RL. Reading Standards for Literature

Key Ideas and Details

1.RL.2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
Story Retell
Retell means "tell it again." When you hear or read a story, you try to remember the important parts. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RL.3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
Settings
What are Settings? Settings are places.
Schools, homes, a zoo, a street, a town or city are all settings.
Try this! Find a setting: a] girl b] horse c] house d] mouse Read more...
iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Real or Fantasy
What is real and what is fantasy? When you read or write, you hear or tell about real things. But sometimes you read or write about things that can not really happen. This is what we call fantasy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Craft and Structure

1.RL.5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Real or Fantasy
What is real and what is fantasy? When you read or write, you hear or tell about real things. But sometimes you read or write about things that can not really happen. This is what we call fantasy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

1.RL.7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
Settings
What are Settings? Settings are places.
Schools, homes, a zoo, a street, a town or city are all settings.
Try this! Find a setting: a] girl b] horse c] house d] mouse Read more...
iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Real or Fantasy
What is real and what is fantasy? When you read or write, you hear or tell about real things. But sometimes you read or write about things that can not really happen. This is what we call fantasy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

WI.CC.1.RI. Reading Standards for Informational Text

Key Ideas and Details

1.RI.2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Craft and Structure

1.RI.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
Parts of a Book
Books have special parts to help you find information easily. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Alphabetizing
FreeWhat is Alphabetizing? You alphabetize when you put words in order by using the alphabet. Words that begin with ‘a’ come first. Words that begin with ‘z’ must be last when you are alphabetizing. Read more...iWorksheets :30Study Guides :1
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.RI.6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is a Main Idea in a Visual Message? Pictures and actions send messages without words. Here are some you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

1.RI.7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is a Main Idea in a Visual Message? Pictures and actions send messages without words. Here are some you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

1.RI.10. With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Real or Fantasy
What is real and what is fantasy? When you read or write, you hear or tell about real things. But sometimes you read or write about things that can not really happen. This is what we call fantasy. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

WI.CC.1.RF. Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Phonological Awareness

1.RF.2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
1.RF.2.a. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.
Long/Short Vowels
What is meant by long or short vowels? Long vowels are the vowels that say their own names. Short vowel sounds do not say their names. Here’s a rule to help you know when to make a short vowel sound: A vowel is usually short if it comes at the beginning of a word or between two consonants and is the only vowel in the word or syllable. A vowel is usually long if two vowels are in the word or syllable. The first vowel is long and the second is silent. Remember when two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Long and Short Vowel Discrimination
A vowel is long when it says its own name. In a dictionary or glossary it will have a straight line over it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Short Vowel Discrimination
Discriminating between short vowel sounds with one syllable words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Short Vowel Sound
What is a Short Vowel? The vowels are the letters, a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y. Vowels make special sounds in words. They make a sound we call short. Look at these words. They all have the short vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RF.2.b. Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.
Beginning Digraphs
Many words begin with a digraph. That means two letters come together and make a brand new sound. You cannot sound out the word by using each letter’s sound because they have changed into a new sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Consonant Blends and Digraphs
What is a Consonant Blend? When two consonants come together in a word but still make their own sounds, we call that a blend. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Words with Initial Blends
A blend means two letters are read together to make a smooth sound. Each one still makes its own sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ending Digraphs
Spelling is easy when you recognize special digraphs. Here are some words you should know that end with digraphs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RF.2.c. Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.
Beginning Sounds
FreeBeginning sounds are the letter sounds you hear at the beginning of a word. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ending Sounds
What are Ending Sounds? Many words sound almost the same. The sound you hear at the end of a word is important. Listen carefully to hear the end of each word. Say the sound at the end of each word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

Phonics and Word Recognition

1.RF.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
1.RF.3.a. Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.
Beginning Digraphs
Many words begin with a digraph. That means two letters come together and make a brand new sound. You cannot sound out the word by using each letter’s sound because they have changed into a new sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Consonant Blends and Digraphs
What is a Consonant Blend? When two consonants come together in a word but still make their own sounds, we call that a blend. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Words with Initial Blends
A blend means two letters are read together to make a smooth sound. Each one still makes its own sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ending Digraphs
Spelling is easy when you recognize special digraphs. Here are some words you should know that end with digraphs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RF.3.c. Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.
Long Vowel - Silent e
Long vowels say their own names in many words. They have a special helper called Silent e that makes them say their own name. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Words with -ce and -se
What are the sounds of -ce and -se? Listen carefully to the sound of s and soft c in each word: ace, case. They sound almost exactly the same. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RF.3.d. Use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word.
Syllables
What are Syllables? Syllables are parts of words. Each part of a word has one vowel sound in it. Be careful! You may see more than one vowel letter, but still hear only one vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.RF.3.e. Decode two-syllable words following basic patterns by breaking the words into syllables.
Syllables
What are Syllables? Syllables are parts of words. Each part of a word has one vowel sound in it. Be careful! You may see more than one vowel letter, but still hear only one vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.RF.3.f. Read words with inflectional endings.
Continuous Action (-ing)
How do you add the ING suffix to verbs? We add -ing to many verbs. But to spell them correctly, you need to remember the rules. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.RF.3.g. Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
Frequently Misspelled Words
Words that are often misspelled and some hints to help you spell them. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Fluency

1.RF.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
1.RF.4.c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

WI.CC.1.L. Language Standards

Conventions of Standard English

1.L.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
1.L.1.b. Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Proper Nouns
A proper noun is a special name for a particular person, place, or thing. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. If there is more than one word for a particular person, place, or thing, then the first, last, and all important words are capitalized. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Alphabetizing
FreeWhat is Alphabetizing? You alphabetize when you put words in order by using the alphabet. Words that begin with ‘a’ come first. Words that begin with ‘z’ must be last when you are alphabetizing. Read more...iWorksheets :30Study Guides :1
Nouns
What are Nouns? Nouns are words used to identify ideas, actions, qualities, persons, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.L.1.c. Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Alphabetizing
FreeWhat is Alphabetizing? You alphabetize when you put words in order by using the alphabet. Words that begin with ‘a’ come first. Words that begin with ‘z’ must be last when you are alphabetizing. Read more...iWorksheets :30Study Guides :1
Plural Ending -es
Plural endings adding -es for words ending in sh, ch, x, and z. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Nouns
What are Nouns? Nouns are words used to identify ideas, actions, qualities, persons, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.L.1.d. Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
Pronouns
What is a Pronoun? A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.L.1.e. Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
Past Tense (-ed)
Past tense means something happened in the past. It could be many years ago, yesterday, or just a few minutes ago. Verbs change in special ways to show past tense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.1.f. Use frequently occurring adjectives.
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Alphabetizing
FreeWhat is Alphabetizing? You alphabetize when you put words in order by using the alphabet. Words that begin with ‘a’ come first. Words that begin with ‘z’ must be last when you are alphabetizing. Read more...iWorksheets :30Study Guides :1
1.L.1.i. Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Alphabetizing
FreeWhat is Alphabetizing? You alphabetize when you put words in order by using the alphabet. Words that begin with ‘a’ come first. Words that begin with ‘z’ must be last when you are alphabetizing. Read more...iWorksheets :30Study Guides :1
1.L.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
1.L.2.b. Use end punctuation for sentences.
Periods and Question Marks
A period is a special end mark for a sentence that tells. It looks like a round circle. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
1.L.2.d. Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
Spelling
FreeSpelling three or four letter words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Frequently Misspelled Words
Words that are often misspelled and some hints to help you spell them. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.2.e. Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.
Spelling
FreeSpelling three or four letter words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

1.L.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
1.L.4.a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Logical Order
What are Three-Step Directions? Three-step directions are actions you take to do a job. You follow them in three steps to do the job well. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.4.b. Use frequently occurring affixes as a clue to the meaning of a word.
Suffixes
A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Prefixes
A prefix is any letter or group of letters Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.L.4.c. Identify frequently occurring root words (e.g., look) and their inflectional forms (e.g., looks, looked, looking).
Continuous Action (-ing)
How do you add the ING suffix to verbs? We add -ing to many verbs. But to spell them correctly, you need to remember the rules. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Root Words
What are Root Words? Root words are sometimes called base words. A root word is the smallest form of a word before it has anything added to it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.5. With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
1.L.5.a. Sort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.
Categorizing Words
To categorize means to put words into groups that belong together. A category is a group. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.5.b. Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is a large cat with stripes).
Categorizing Words
To categorize means to put words into groups that belong together. A category is a group. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.L.5.c. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy).
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Challenge Words
What are some of the most difficult words a second grader must learn to spell? Here are some words you should know how to spell and some hints to help you remember. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Standards

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