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New York Standards for High School Science

NY.C. PHYSICAL SETTING / CHEMISTRY

C.1. Analysis, Inquiry, and Design: Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.

C.1.M1. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Abstraction and symbolic representation are used to communicate mathematically.
1.M1.1. Use algebraic and geometric representations to describe and compare data.
1.M1.1.i. Organize, graph, and analyze data gathered from laboratory activities or other sources: identify independent and dependent variables.1.M1.1.ii. Organize, graph, and analyze data gathered from laboratory activities or other sources: create appropriate axes with labels and scale.1.M1.1.iii. Organize, graph, and analyze data gathered from laboratory activities or other sources: identify graph points clearly.1.M1.1.iv. Measure and record experimental data and use data in calculations: choose appropriate measurement scales and use units in recording.1.M1.1.v. Measure and record experimental data and use data in calculations: show mathematical work, stating formula and steps for solution.1.M1.1.vii. Measure and record experimental data and use data in calculations: use appropriate equations and significant digits.1.M1.1.xii. Recognize and convert various scales of measurement: Length - kilometers (km); meters (m); centimeters (cm); millimeters (mm).1.M1.1.xiii. Recognize and convert various scales of measurement: Mass - grams (g); kilograms (kg).1.M1.1.xiv. Recognize and convert various scales of measurement: Pressure - kilopascal (kPa); atmosphere (atm).1.M1.1.xv. Use knowledge of geometric arrangements to predict particle properties or behavior.
C.1.M2. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Deductive and inductive reasoning are used to reach mathematical conclusions.
1.M2.1. Use deductive reasoning to construct and evaluate conjectures and arguments, recognizing that patterns and relationships in mathematics assist them in arriving at these conjectures and arguments.
1.M2.1.i. Interpret a graph constructed from experimentally obtained data: identify relationships - direct; inverse.1.M2.1.ii. Interpret a graph constructed from experimentally obtained data: apply data showing trends to predict information.
C.1.M3. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Critical thinking skills are used in the solution of mathematical problems.
1.M3.1. Apply algebraic and geometric concepts and skills to the solution of problems.
1.M3.1.i. State assumptions which apply to the use of a particular mathematical equation and evaluate these assumptions to see if they have been met.
C.1.S1. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The central purpose of scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in a continuing, creative process.
1.S1.1. Elaborate on basic scientific and personal explanations of natural phenomena, and develop extended visual models and mathematical formulations to represent thinking.
1.S1.1.i. Use theories and/or models to represent and explain observations.1.S1.1.ii. Use theories and/or principles to make predictions about natural phenomena.
1.S1.3. Work towards reconciling competing explanations, clarifying points of agreement and disagreement.
1.S1.3.i. Evaluate the merits of various scientific theories and indicate why one theory was accepted over another.
C.1.S2. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: Beyond the use of reasoning and consensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanations involving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiring considerable ingenuity.
1.S2.1. Devise ways of making observations to test proposed explanations.
1.S2.1.i. Design and/or carry out experiments, using scientific methodology to test proposed calculations.
1.S2.4. Carry out a research plan for testing explanations, including selecting and developing techniques, acquiring and building apparatus, and recording observations as necessary.
1.S2.4.i. Determine safety procedures to accompany a research plan
C.1.S3. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The observations made while testing proposed explanations, when analyzed using conventional and invented methods, provide new insights into phenomena.
1.S3.1. Use various means of representing and organizing observations (e.g., diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, equations, and matrices) and insightfully interpret the organized data.
1.S3.1.i. Organize observations in a data table, analyze the data for trends or patterns, and interpret the trends or patterns, using scientific concepts.
1.S3.3. Assess correspondence between the predicted result contained in the hypothesis and the actual result, and reach a conclusion as to whether or not the explanation on which the prediction is supported.
1.S3.3.ii. Compare the experimental result to the expected result; calculate the percent error as appropriate.

C.4. The Physical Setting: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

C.4.3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable characteristics of matter and its reactivity.
4.3.1. Explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
4.3.1.i. Use models to describe the structure of an atom.4.3.1.ii. Relate experimental evidence (given in the introduction of Key Idea 3) to models of the atom.4.3.1.iii. Determine the number of protons or electrons in an atom or ion when given one of these values.4.3.1.iv. Calculate the mass of an atom, the number of neutrons or the number of protons, given the other two values.4.3.1.v. Distinguish between ground state and excited state electron configurations, e.g., 2-8-2 vs. 2-7-3.4.3.1.vii. Distinguish between valence and non-valence electrons, given an electron configuration, e.g., 2-8-2.4.3.1.x. Interpret and write isotopic notation.4.3.1.xi. Given an atomic mass, determine the most abundant isotope.4.3.1.xii. Calculate the atomic mass of an element, given the masses and ratios of naturally occurring isotopes.4.3.1.xiii. Classify elements as metals, nonmetals, metalloids, or noble gases by their properties.4.3.1.xiv. Compare and contrast properties of elements within a group or a period for Groups 1, 2, 13-18 on the Periodic Table.4.3.1.xix. Distinguish among ionic, molecular, and metallic substances, given their properties.4.3.1.xv. Determine the group of an element, given the chemical formula of a compound, e.g., XCl or XCl2.4.3.1.xvi. Explain the placement of an unknown element on the Periodic Table based on its properties.4.3.1.xvii. Classify an organic compound based on its structural or condensed structural formula.4.3.1.xviii. Describe the states of the elements at STP.4.3.1.xxii. Use a simple particle model to differentiate among properties of solids, liquids, and gases.4.3.1.xxiii. Compare the entropy of phases of matter.4.3.1.xxix. Calculate solution concentration in molarity (M), percent mass, and parts per million (ppm).4.3.1.xxvi. Apply the adage ''like dissolves like'' to real-world situations.4.3.1.xxvii. Interpret solution concentration data.4.3.1.xxx. Describe the preparation of a solution, given the molarity.4.3.1.xxxi. Given properties, identify substances as Arrhenius acids or Arrhenius bases.4.3.1.xxxiv. Write simple neutralization reactions when given the reactants.
4.3.2. Use atomic and molecular models to explain common chemical reactions.
4.3.2.i. Distinguish between chemical and physical changes.4.3.2.ii. Identify types of chemical reactions.4.3.2.iii. Determine a missing reactant or product in a balanced equation.4.3.2.ix. Compare and contrast voltaic and electrolytic cells.4.3.2.v. Balance equations, given the formulas of reactants and products.4.3.2.viii. Identify and label the parts of an electrolytic cell (cathode, anode) and direction of electron flow, given the reaction equation.
4.3.3. Apply the principle of conservation of mass to chemical reactions.
4.3.3.i. Balance equations, given the formulas for reactants and products.4.3.3.iii. Create and use models of particles to demonstrate balanced equations.
4.3.4. Use kinetic molecular theory (KMT) to explain rates of reactions and the relationships among temperature, pressure, and volume of a substance.
4.3.4.i. Explain the gas laws in terms of KMT.4.3.4.ii. Solve problems, using the combined gas laws.4.3.4.iv. Describe the concentration of particles and rates of opposing reactions in an equilibrium system.4.3.4.vi. Use collision theory to explain how various factors, such as temperature, surface area, and concentration, influence the rate of reaction.4.3.4.vii. Identify examples of physical equilibria as solution equilibrium and phase equilibrium, including the concept that a saturated solution is at equilibrium.
C.4.4. Energy exists in many forms, and when these forms change, energy is conserved.
4.4.1. Observe and describe transmission of various forms of energy.
4.4.1.i. Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic reactions, using energy terms in a reaction equation, delta H, potential energy diagrams, or experimental data.4.4.1.ii. Read and interpret potential energy diagrams: PE reactants, PE products, activation energy (with or without a catalyst), heat of reaction.
4.4.2. Explain heat in terms of kinetic molecular theory.
4.4.2.i. Distinguish between heat energy and temperature in terms of molecular motion and amount of matter.4.4.2.ii. Explain phase change in terms of the changes in energy and intermolecular distances.4.4.2.iii. Qualitatively interpret heating and cooling curves in terms of changes in kinetic and potential energy, heat of vaporization, heat of fusion, and phase changes.
C.4.5. Energy and matter interact through forces that result in changes in motion.
4.5.2. Students will explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
4.5.2.i. Demonstrate bonding concepts, using Lewis dot structures representing valence electrons: transferred (ionic bonding); shared (covalent bonding); in a stable octet.4.5.2.ii. Compare the physical properties of substances based on chemical bonds and intermolecular forces, e.g., conductivity, malleability, solubility, hardness, melting point, and boiling point.4.5.2.iii. Explain vapor pressure, evaporation rate, and phase changes in terms of intermolecular forces.4.5.2.iv. Determine the noble gas configuration an atom will achieve by bonding.4.5.2.v. Distinguish between nonpolar covalent bonds (two of the same nonmetals) and polar covalent bonds.

C.6. Interconnectedness: Common Themes: Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning.

C.6.1. Through systems thinking, people can recognize the commonalities that exist among all systems and how parts of a system interrelate and combine to perform specific functions.
6.1.1. Use the concept of systems and surroundings to describe heat flow in a chemical or physical change, e.g., dissolving process.
C.6.2. Models are simplified representations of objects, structures, or systems used in analysis, explanation, interpretation, or design.
6.2.1. Revise a model to create a more complete or improved representation of the system.
6.2.1.i. Show how models are revised in response to experimental evidence, e.g., atomic theory, Periodic Table.
6.2.2. Collect information about the behavior of a system and use modeling tools to represent the operation of the system.
6.2.2.i. Show how information about a system is used to create a model, e.g., kinetic molecular theory (KMT).
6.2.3. Find and use mathematical models that behave in the same manner as the processes under investigation.
6.2.3.i. Show how mathematical models (equations) describe a process, e.g., combined gas law.
C.6.3. The grouping of magnitudes of size, time, frequency, and pressures or other units of measurement into a series of relative order provides a useful way to deal with the immense range and the changes in scale that affect the behavior and design of systems.
6.3.1. Describe the effects of changes in scale on the functioning of physical, biological, or designed information systems.
6.3.1.i. Show how microscale processes can resemble or differ from real-world processes, e.g., microscale chemistry.
C.6.4. Equilibrium is a state of stability due either to a lack of change (static equilibrium) or a balance between opposing forces (dynamic equilibrium).
6.4.1. Describe specific instances of how disturbances might affect a system's equilibrium, from small disturbances that do not upset the equilibrium to larger disturbances (threshold level) that cause the system to become unstable.
6.4.1.i. Explain how a small change might not affect a system, e.g., activation energy.
C.6.5. Identifying patterns of change is necessary for making predictions about future behavior and conditions.
6.5.1. Use graphs to make predictions, e.g., half-life, solubility.
6.5.2. Use graphs to identify patterns and interpret experimental data, e.g., heating and cooling curves.

C.7. Interdisciplinary Problem Solving: Students will apply the knowledge and thinking skills of mathematics, science, and technology to address real-life problems and make informed decisions.

C.7.1. The knowledge and skills of mathematics, science, and technology are used together to make informed decisions and solve problems, especially those relating to issues of science/technology/society, consumer decision making, design, and inquiry into phenomena.
7.1.2. Analyze and quantify consumer product data, understand environmental and economic impacts, develop a method for judging the value and efficacy of competing products, and discuss cost-benefit and risk-benefit trade-offs made in arriving at the optimal choice.
7.1.2.i. Compare and analyze specific consumer products, e.g., antacids, vitamin C.
C.7.2. Solving interdisciplinary problems involves a variety of skills and strategies, including effective work habits; gathering and processing information; generating and analyzing ideas; realizing ideas; making connections among the common themes of mathematics, science, and technology; and presenting results. If students are asked to do a project, then the project would require students to:
7.2.2. Gather and process information
7.2.4. Observe common themes

NY.CC.11-12.RST. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Craft and Structure

11-12.RST.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.
Ecology IWorksheets :4Vocabularies :2Ecology IIWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical Formulas and BondingWorksheets :3Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Measurements and CalculationsWorksheets :3Protection, Reproduction and CooperationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Moving and Controlling the BodyWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Providing Fuel and TransportationWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Food Chains and Food WebsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Six Kingdoms of LifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Plate TectonicsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Cell TransportWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Work, Power & Simple MachinesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2EarthquakesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Pond MicrolifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Chromosomes, Genes and DNAWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MitosisWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2The Study of HeredityWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Our Solar SystemWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Earth`s SurfaceWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Properties and States of MatterWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Earth`s ClimateWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Photosynthesis and RespirationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2RocksWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2VolcanoesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MeiosisWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Forces and MotionWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Energy: Forms and ChangesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3SoundWorksheets :3Vocabularies :4Light and OpticsWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Elements and the periodic tableWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Atoms and Chemical BondingWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

11-12.RST.8. Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.
11-12.RST.9. Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

NY.CC.11-12.WHST. Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

11-12.WHST.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Text Types and Purposes

11-12.WHST.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
11-12.WHST.2.d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
11-12.WHST.2.e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

NY.CC.9-10.RST. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Craft and Structure

9-10.RST.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
The Digestive and nutritionWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :4Ecosystems, food chains and food websWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :5Chemical bondingFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabularies :1Chemical reactionsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabularies :1Ecology IWorksheets :4Vocabularies :2Ecology IIWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical Formulas and BondingWorksheets :3Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Measurements and CalculationsWorksheets :3Protection, Reproduction and CooperationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Moving and Controlling the BodyWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Providing Fuel and TransportationWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Food Chains and Food WebsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Six Kingdoms of LifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Plate TectonicsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Cell TransportWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Work, Power & Simple MachinesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2EarthquakesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Pond MicrolifeWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Chromosomes, Genes and DNAWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MitosisWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2The Study of HeredityWorksheets :2Vocabularies :2Our Solar SystemWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Earth`s SurfaceWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Properties and States of MatterWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Earth`s ClimateWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Photosynthesis and RespirationWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2RocksWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2VolcanoesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3MeiosisWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Forces and MotionWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Energy: Forms and ChangesWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3SoundWorksheets :3Vocabularies :4Light and OpticsWorksheets :4Vocabularies :3Elements and the periodic tableWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2Chemical ReactionsWorksheets :3Vocabularies :3Atoms and Chemical BondingWorksheets :3Vocabularies :2
9-10.RST.5. Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

9-10.RST.7. Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
9-10.RST.9. Compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the findings support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.

NY.CC.9-10.WHST. Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

9-10.WHST.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Text Types and Purposes

9-10.WHST.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
9-10.WHST.2.d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
9-10.WHST.2.f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

NY.E. PHYSICAL SETTING / EARTH SCIENCE

E.1. Analysis, Inquiry, and Design: Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.

E.1.M2: MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Deductive and inductive reasoning are used to reach mathematical conclusions.
1.M2.1. Determine the relationships among: velocity, slope, sediment size, channel shape, and volume of a stream
1.M2.2. Understand the relationships among: the planets' distance from the Sun, gravitational force, period of revolution, and speed of revolution
E.1.S1: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The central purpose of scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in a continuing, creative process.
1.S1.1. Show how our observation of celestial motions supports the idea of stars moving around a stationary Earth (the geocentric model), but further investigation has led scientists to understand that most of these changes are a result of Earth's motion around the Sun (the heliocentric model)
E.1.S2: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: Beyond the use of reasoning and consensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanations involving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiring considerable ingenuity.
1.S2.1. Test sediment properties and the rate of deposition
E.1.T1: ENGINEERING DESIGN: Engineering design is an iterative process involving modeling and optimization (finding the best solution within given constraints); this process is used to develop technological solutions to problems within given constraints.
1.T1.2. Determine patterns of topography and drainage around your school and design solutions to effectively deal with runoff

E.2. Information Systems: Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information, using appropriate technologies.

E.2.1: Information technology is used to retrieve, process, and communicate information as a tool to enhance learning.
2.1.1. Analyze weather maps to predict future weather events
E.2.3: Information technology can have positive and negative impacts on society, depending upon how it is used.
2.3.1. Discuss how early warning systems can protect society and the environment from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, and volcanoes

E.4. The Physical Setting: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

E.4.1: The Earth and celestial phenomena can be described by principles of relative motion and perspective.
4.1.1. Explain complex phenomena, such as tides, variations in day length, solar insolation, apparent motion of the planets, and annual traverse of the constellations.
4.1.2. Describe current theories about the origin of the universe and solar system.
E.4.2: Many of the phenomena that we observe on Earth involve interactions among components of air, water, and land.
4.2.1. Use the concepts of density and heat energy to explain observations of weather patterns, seasonal changes, and the movements of Earth's plates.
4.2.2. Explain how incoming solar radiation, ocean currents, and land masses affect weather and climate.

E.6. Interconnectedness: Common Themes: Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning.

E.6.1: Through systems thinking, people can recognize the commonalities that exist among all systems and how parts of a system interrelate and combine to perform specific functions.
6.1.1. Analyze a depositional-erosional system of a stream
E.6.2: Models are simplified representations of objects, structures, or systems used in analysis, explanation, interpretation, or design.
6.2.1. Draw a simple contour map of a model landform
6.2.2. Design a 3-D landscape model from a contour map
6.2.3. Construct and interpret a profile based on an isoline map
6.2.4. Use flowcharts to identify rocks and minerals
E.6.3: The grouping of magnitudes of size, time, frequency, and pressures or other units of measurement into a series of relative order provides a useful way to deal with the immense range and the changes in scale that affect the behavior and design of systems.
6.3.2. Develop a scale model of units of geologic time
6.3.3. Use topographical maps to determine distances and elevations
E.6.4: Equilibrium is a state of stability due either to a lack of change (static equilibrium) or a balance between opposing forces (dynamic equilibrium).
6.4.1. Analyze the interrelationship between gravity and inertia and its effects on the orbit of planets or satellites
E.6.5: Identifying patterns of change is necessary for making predictions about future behavior and conditions.
6.5.1. Graph and interpret the nature of cyclic change such as sunspots, tides, and atmospheric carbon dioxide
6.5.2. Based on present data of plate movement, determine past and future positions of land masses
6.5.3. Using given weather data, identify the interface between air masses, such as cold fronts, warm fronts, and stationary fronts
E.6.6: In order to arrive at the best solution that meets criteria within constraints, it is often necessary to make trade-offs.
6.6.1. Debate the effect of human activities as they relate to quality of life on Earth systems (global warming, land use, preservation of natural resources, pollution)

E.7. Interdisciplinary Problem Solving: Students will apply the knowledge and thinking skills of mathematics, science, and technology to address real-life problems and make informed decisions.

E.7.1: The knowledge and skills of mathematics, science, and technology are used together to make informed decisions and solve problems, especially those relating to issues of science/ technology/society, consumer decision making, design, and inquiry into phenomena.
7.1.2. Investigate two similar fossils to determine if they represent a developmental change over time
7.1.3. Investigate the political, economic, and environmental impact of global distribution and use of mineral resources and fossil fuels
7.1.4. Consider environmental and social implications of various solutions to an environmental Earth resources problem
E.7.2: Solving interdisciplinary problems involves a variety of skills and strategies, including effective work habits; gathering and processing information; generating and analyzing ideas; realizing ideas; making connections among the common themes of mathematics, science, and technology; and presenting results.
7.2.1. Collect, collate, and process data concerning potential natural disasters (tornadoes, thunderstorms, blizzards, earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts, etc.) in an area and develop an emergency action plan
7.2.2. Using a topographic map, determine the safest and most efficient route for rescue purposes

NY.L. THE LIVING ENVIRONMENT

L.1. Analysis, Inquiry, and Design: Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.

L.1.S1: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The central purpose of scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in a continuing, creative process.
1.S1.1. Elaborate on basic scientific and personal explanations of natural phenomena, and develop extended visual models and mathematical formulations to represent one's thinking.
1.S1.3. Work toward reconciling competing explanations; clarify points of agreement and disagreement.
1.S1.4. Coordinate explanations at different levels of scale, points of focus, and degrees of complexity and specificity, and recognize the need for such alternative representations of the natural world.
L.1.S2: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: Beyond the use of reasoning and consensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanations involving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiring considerable ingenuity.
1.S2.1. Devise ways of making observations to test proposed explanations.
1.S2.4. Carry out a research plan for testing explanations, including selecting and developing techniques, acquiring and building apparatus, and recording observations as necessary.
L.1.S3: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The observations made while testing proposed explanations, when analyzed using conventional and invented methods, provide new insights into phenomena.
1.S3.2. Apply statistical analysis techniques when appropriate to test if chance alone explains the results.
1.S3.3. Assess correspondence between the predicted result contained in the hypothesis and actual result, and reach a conclusion as to whether the explanation on which the prediction was based is supported.

L.4. The Living Environment: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

L.4.1: Living things are both similar to and different from each other and from nonliving things.
4.1.1. Explain how diversity of populations within ecosystems relates to the stability of ecosystems.
4.1.2. Describe and explain the structures and functions of the human body at different organizational levels (e.g., systems, tissues, cells, organelles).
4.1.3. Explain how a one-celled organism is able to function despite lacking the levels of organization present in more complex organisms.
L.4.2: Organisms inherit genetic information in a variety of ways that result in continuity of structure and function between parents and offspring.
4.2.1. Explain how the structure and replication of genetic material result in offspring that resemble their parents.
4.2.2. Explain how the technology of genetic engineering allows humans to alter genetic makeup of organisms.
L.4.3: Individual organisms and species change over time.
4.3.1. Explain the mechanisms and patterns of evolution.
L.4.4: The continuity of life is sustained through reproduction and development.
4.4.1. Explain how organisms, including humans, reproduce their own kind.
L.4.5: Organisms maintain a dynamic equilibrium that sustains life.
4.5.1. Explain the basic biochemical processes in living organisms and their importance in maintaining dynamic equilibrium.
4.5.2. Explain disease as a failure of homeostasis.
4.5.3. Relate processes at the system level to the cellular level in order to explain dynamic equilibrium in multicelled organisms.
L.4.6: Plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment.
4.6.3. Explain how the living and nonliving environments change over time and respond to disturbances.
L.4.7: Human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environment.
4.7.1. Describe the range of interrelationships of humans with the living and nonliving environment.
4.7.2. Explain the impact of technological development and growth in the human population on the living and nonliving environment.
4.7.3. Explain how individual choices and societal actions can contribute to improving the environment.

NY.P. PHYSICAL SETTING / PHYSICS

P.1. Analysis, Inquiry, and Design: Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.

P.1.M1. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Abstraction and symbolic representation are used to communicate mathematically.
1.M1.1. Use algebraic and geometric representations to describe and compare data.
1.M1.1.ii. Represent physical quantities in graphical form.1.M1.1.iii. Construct graphs of real-world data (scatter plots, line or curve of best fit).1.M1.1.iv. Manipulate equations to solve for unknowns.
P.1.M2. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Deductive and inductive reasoning are used to reach mathematical conclusions.
1.M2.1. Use deductive reasoning to construct and evaluate conjectures and arguments, recognizing that patterns and relationships in mathematics assist them in arriving at these conjectures and arguments.
1.M2.1.i. Interpret graphs to determine the mathematical relationship between the variables.
P.1.M3. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS: Critical thinking skills are used in the solution of mathematical problems.
1.M3.1. Apply algebraic and geometric concepts and skills to the solution of problems.
1.M3.1.i. Explain the physical relevance of properties of a graphical representation of real-world data, e.g., slope, intercepts, area under the curve.
P.1.S1. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The central purpose of scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in a continuing, creative process.
1.S1.1. Develop extended visual models and mathematical formulations to represent an understanding of natural phenomena.
1.S1.2. Clarify ideas through reasoning, research, and discussion.
P.1.S2. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: Beyond the use of reasoning and consensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanations involving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiring considerable ingenuity.
1.S2.4. Carry out a research plan for testing explanations, including selecting and developing techniques, acquiring and building apparatus, and recording observations as necessary. (Note: This could apply to many activities from simple investigations to long-term projects.)
P.1.S3. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: The observations made while testing proposed explanations, when analyzed using conventional and invented methods, provide new insights into phenomena.
1.S3.2. Apply statistical analysis techniques when appropriate to test if chance alone explains the result.
1.S3.2.i. Examine collected data to evaluate the reliability of experimental results, including percent error, range, standard deviation, line of best fit, and the use of the correct number of significant digits
1.S3.3. Assess correspondence between the predicted result contained in the hypothesis and the actual result, and reach a conclusion as to whether or not the explanation on which the prediction was based is supported.

P.2. Information Systems: Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information, using appropriate technologies.

P.2.1. Information technology is used to retrieve, process, and communicate information as a tool to enhance learning.
2.1.2. Prepare multimedia presentations demonstrating a clear sense of audience and purpose. (Note: Multimedia may include posters, slides, images, presentation software, etc.)
2.1.2.ii. Use appropriate technology to gather experimental data, develop models, and present results.
P.2.2. Knowledge of the impacts and limitations of information systems is essential to its effective and ethical use.
P.2.3. Information technology can have positive and negative impacts on society, depending upon how it is used.

P.4. The Physical Setting: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

P.4.4. Energy exists in many forms, and when these forms change energy is conserved.
4.4.1. Observe and describe transmission of various forms of energy.
4.4.1.i. Describe and explain the exchange among potential energy, kinetic energy, and internal energy for simple mechanical systems, such as a pendulum, a roller coaster, a spring, a freely falling object.4.4.1.ii. Predict velocities, heights, and spring compressions based on energy conservation.4.4.1.iii. Determine the energy stored in a spring.4.4.1.ix. Use measurements to determine the resistance of a circuit element.4.4.1.v. Observe and explain energy conversions in real-world situations.4.4.1.vi. Recognize and describe conversions among different forms of energy in real or hypothetical devices such as a motor, a generator, a photocell, a battery.4.4.1.vii. Compare the power developed when the same work is done at different rates.4.4.1.viii. Measure current and voltage in a circuit.4.4.1.x. Interpret graphs of voltage versus current.4.4.1.xi. Measure and compare the resistance of conductors of various lengths and cross-sectional areas.4.4.1.xii. Construct simple series and parallel circuits.4.4.1.xiii. Draw and interpret circuit diagrams which include voltmeters and ammeters.4.4.1.xiv. Predict the behavior of lightbulbs in series and parallel circuits.4.4.1.xv. Map the magnetic field of a permanent magnet, indicating the direction of the field between the N (north-seeking) and S (south-seeking) poles.
4.4.3. Explain variations in wavelength and frequency in terms of the source of the vibrations that produce them, e.g., molecules, electrons, and nuclear particles.
4.4.3.i. Compare the characteristics of two transverse waves such as amplitude, frequency, wavelength, speed, period, and phase.4.4.3.ii. Draw wave forms with various characteristics.4.4.3.iii. Identify nodes and antinodes in standing waves.4.4.3.iv. Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal waves.4.4.3.ix. Determine empirically the index of refraction of a transparent medium.4.4.3.v. Determine the speed of sound in air.4.4.3.vi. Predict the superposition of two waves interfering constructively and destructively (indicating nodes, antinodes, and standing waves).4.4.3.vii. Observe, sketch, and interpret the behavior of wave fronts as they reflect, refract, and diffract.4.4.3.viii. Draw ray diagrams to represent the reflection and refraction of waves.
P.4.5. Energy and matter interact through forces that result in changes in motion.
4.5.1. Explain and predict different patterns of motion of objects (e.g., linear and uniform circular motion, velocity and acceleration, momentum and inertia).
4.5.1.i. Construct and interpret graphs of position, velocity, or acceleration versus time.4.5.1.ii. Determine and interpret slopes and areas of motion graphs.4.5.1.ix. Verify Newton's Second Law for linear motion.4.5.1.viii. Use vector diagrams to analyze mechanical systems (equilibrium and nonequilibrium).4.5.1.xi. Verify Newton's Second Law for uniform circular motion.4.5.1.xii. Verify conservation of momentum.4.5.1.xiii. Determine a spring constant.
4.5.3. Compare energy relationships within an atom's nucleus to those outside the nucleus.
4.5.3.i. Interpret energy-level diagrams.

P.6. Interconnectedness: Common Themes: Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning.

P.6.3. The grouping of magnitudes of size, time, frequency, and pressures or other units of measurement into a series of relative order provides a useful way to deal with the immense range and the changes in scale that affect the behavior and design of systems.
6.3.1. Describe the effects of changes in scale on the functioning of physical, biological, or designed systems.
P.6.4. Equilibrium is a state of stability due either to a lack of change (static equilibrium) or a balance between opposing forces (dynamic equilibrium).
6.4.1. Describe specific instances of how disturbances might affect a system's equilibrium, from small disturbances that do not upset the equilibrium to larger disturbances (threshold level) that cause the system to become unstable.
6.4.2. Cite specific examples of how dynamic equilibrium is achieved by equality of change in opposing directions.
P.6.5. Identifying patterns of change is necessary for making predictions about future behavior and conditions.
6.5.1. Use sophisticated mathematical models, such as graphs and equations of various algebraic or trigonometric functions.
6.5.1.i. Predict the behavior of physical systems, using mathematical models such as graphs and equations.
6.5.2. Search for multiple trends when analyzing data for patterns, and identify data that do not fit the trends.
6.5.2.i. Deduce patterns from the organization and presentation of data.6.5.2.ii. Identify and develop models, using patterns in data.
P.6.6. In order to arrive at the best solution that meets criteria within constraints, it is often necessary to make trade-offs.
6.6.1. Determine optimal solutions to problems that can be solved using quantitative methods.

P.7. Interdisciplinary Problem Solving: Students will apply the knowledge and thinking skills of mathematics, science, and technology to address real-life problems and make informed decisions.

P.7.1. The knowledge and skills of mathematics, science, and technology are used together to make informed decisions and solve problems, especially those relating to issues of science/ technology/society, consumer decision making, design, and inquiry into phenomena.
7.1.1. Address real-world problems, using scientific methodology.
P.7.2. Solving interdisciplinary problems involves a variety of skills and strategies, including effective work habits; gathering and processing information; generating and analyzing ideas; realizing ideas; making connections among the common themes of mathematics, science, and technology; and presenting results.
7.2.1. Collect, analyze, interpret, and present data, using appropriate tools.
7.2.2. If students participate in an extended, culminating mathematics, science, and technology project, then students should:
7.2.2.ii. Gather and process information7.2.2.iii. Generate and analyze ideas7.2.2.iv. Observe common themes7.2.2.v. Realize ideas

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