P21's Framework for 21st Century for Sixth Grade Social Studies

Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Resources & EnergyEnergy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

P21-1. Key SUBJECTS AND 21st CENTURY THEMES

1.2. Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy

1.2.2. Understanding the role of the economy in society
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.3. Civic Literacy

1.3.1. Participating effectively in civic life through knowing how to stay informed and understanding governmental processes
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.3.2. Exercising the rights and obligations of citizenship at local, state, national and global levels
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

1.5. Environmental Literacy

1.5.1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the environment and the circumstances and conditions affecting it, particularly as relates to air, climate, land, food, energy, water and ecosystems
Earth's freshwater and atmospherePlanet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Weather, Weather patterns and climateHow do clouds form? Main types of clouds. Precipitation. Air Pressure. What are the Four Most Influential Air Masses that Affect the Weather in North America? What is needed for a thunderstorm to occur? Thunderstorm key ingredients: Moisture, Instability and Uplift. What is a hurricane? What is a tornado? What is climate? Climate Zones: Polar zone, Temperate zone, Tropical zone. The location of the zone determines its climate. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :5
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.5.2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of society’s impact on the natural world (e.g., population growth, population development, resource consumption rate, etc.)
Earth's freshwater and atmospherePlanet Earth (the planet on which we happen to live) spins on an imaginary line called an axis. One spin around on its axis is called a revolution. As the earth rotates, the areas facing the Sun slowly change, and that means the time of day and the temperatures change.The sun is the main energy supply for the water cycle. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Vocabulary :4
Earth's oceansOceans are a natural resource for salt and the fish and other sea animals we eat. Ocean Currents. Ocean Tides, Trenches, Mid-Ocean Ridges, Seamounts, The Flat Abyssal Plains, The Continental Shelf. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
Energy resourcesA renewable resource is a resource that can be naturally restored or at least replenished as it is needed: The power of WIND, the power of WATER, the power of the SUN, Geothermal energy (heat from the earth), the Energy of TRASH. Fossil fuels - Crude Oil, Coal, Natural Gas - are nonrenewable resources. These types of resources take much longer to replace than most societies can wait. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

P21-2. LEARNING AND INNOVATION SKILLS

2.2. CRITICAL THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING

2.2.3. Make Judgments and Decisions
2.2.3.1. Effectively analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims and beliefs
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Fact/Opinion/ExaggerationRecognize fact, opinion, and exaggeration. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Cause/Effect, Fact/OpinionCause and effect refers to the relationship between two events. A cause is why something happens and an effect is what happened as a result of that cause. A fact is information that is known to be true. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Sentence Purpose IdentificationTopic Sentence. A topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph that expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentence. A supporting sentence supports the main idea of the paragraph. Concluding sentence. A concluding sentence wraps up what was talked about in the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Fact/OpinionFreeA fact is information that is known to be true; it is a certainty. A fact does not change from person to person. An opinion is a personal belief or idea. People do not always have the same beliefs or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details give you specific details about the main idea of the text. A supporting detail SUPPORTS and DEVELOPS the text’s main idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Opinion/Exaggeration/Missing InfoExaggeration is a representation of something in an excessive manner. It is the opposite of minimisation. Identify missing and irrelevant information. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expository TextExpository writing explains a topic(s) to the reader. This type of writing may also inform the reader, or compare and contrast different subjects. Example: "How To," or Process Directions: How to Climb a Rock Wall, How to Train for a Marathon. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.2.3.3. Synthesize and make connections between information and arguments
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.2.3.4. Interpret information and draw conclusions based on the best analysis
Implied InformationCite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing InferencesAn inference is a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text. When you read, you draw inferences or make conclusions based on what you read. The conclusion may not be stated in the text, but from what the writing tells the reader, the reader infers what is meant. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing InferencesWhat are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsA conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsWhat is a Conclusion? A conclusion is an educated guess you make when reading, based on the facts and details the author gives in a text. Some information may be implied by the author in the text, but may not be clearly stated. You then have to draw your own conclusions in order to better understand the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Implied InformationDraw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.2.4. Solve Problems
2.2.4.1. Solve different kinds of non-familiar problems in both conventional and innovative ways
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.3. COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION

2.3.1. Communicate Clearly
2.3.1.1. Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.3.1.4. Utilize multiple media and technologies, and know how to judge their effectiveness a priori as well as assess their impact
Listening and ViewingAn effective listener: has eye contact with the speaker, listens for the purpose of the speech, asks the speaker questions at the appropriate time, does not interrupt the speaker. An effective viewer: looks for the purpose in an advertisement, notices the date in a magazine or newspaper, searches for the labels on exhibits. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

P21-3. INFORMATION, MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

3.1. INFORMATION LITERACY

3.1.2. Use and Manage Information
3.1.2.1. Use information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand
Thinking SkillsDefine, classify, infer, condense, categorize, analyze, paraphrase. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.2. MEDIA LITERACY

3.2.1. Analyze Media
3.2.1.2. Examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors
Listening and ViewingAn effective listener: has eye contact with the speaker, listens for the purpose of the speech, asks the speaker questions at the appropriate time, does not interrupt the speaker. An effective viewer: looks for the purpose in an advertisement, notices the date in a magazine or newspaper, searches for the labels on exhibits. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.3. ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) LITERACY

3.3.1. Apply Technology Effectively
3.3.1.1. Use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information
The nature of scienceScience process skills include observing, classifying, estimating, measuring, inferring, predicting, creating graphs, and developing models. Identify Dependent and Controlled Variables: A dependent variable is the variable that is being observed during an experiment. A control variable is the part of an experiment that you do not make any changes to which you can use to compare the other parts of your experiment to. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

P21-4. LIFE AND CAREER SKILLS

4.4. PRODUCTIVITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

4.4.2. Produce Results
4.4.2.1. Demonstrate additional attributes associated with producing high quality products including the abilities to:
4.4.2.1.a. Work positively and ethically
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.b. Manage time and projects effectively
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.c. Multi-task
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.d. Participate actively, as well as be reliable and punctual
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.e. Present oneself professionally and with proper etiquette
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.f. Collaborate and cooperate effectively with teams
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.g. Respect and appreciate team diversity
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.4.2.1.h. Be accountable for results
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingExplain, describe, narrate, persuade, express feelings. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Process WritingThe stages that writers go through in order to complete a written piece are called the writing process, or process writing. Examples: The stage at which writers plan their writing is called the prewriting stage. The stage at which writers get their ideas down on paper is called the drafting stage. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SpeakingSpeaking, a type of communication, can be categorized into formal speaking and informal speaking. Informal speaking involves a situation where a speaker does not prepare ahead of time to speak, like answering the telephone and introducing people to each other. A prepared speech is an example of formal speaking. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Common Core State StandardsConnecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Common Core StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNorth Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsP21's Framework for 21st CenturyPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirgin Islands Common Core StandardsVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards