Missouri Learning Standards for Sixth Grade Social Studies

Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

MO.6-8.AH. American History

6-8.AH.1. Tools of Social Science Inquiry

6-8.AH.1.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.AH.1.CC.A. Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of related events in American History
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.CC.B. Explain connections between historical context and peoples’ perspectives at the time in American history.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama Canal
The Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.CC.D. Using an inquiry lens, develop compelling questions about American history prior to 1870, to determine helpful resources and consider multiple points of views represented in the resources.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.CC.E. Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific problem in American history prior to c. 1870 as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.GS. Government Systems and Principals
6-8.AH.1.GS.A. Analyze laws, policies and processes to determine how governmental systems affect individuals and groups in society in American history prior to c.1870.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.G. Geographic Study
6-8.AH.1.G.B. Explain how the physical and human characteristics of regions in the Americas prior to c. 1870 are connected to changing identity and culture.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.G.C. Locate major cities of Missouri, the United States, and the world; states of the United States and key world nations; the world’s continents, and oceans; and major topographical features of the United States.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.AH.1.EC.A. Using an American history lens, examine the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals, prior to c. 1870.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.AH.1.PC.A. Using an American history lens, describe how peoples’ perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created.
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.1.PC.B. Using an American history lens, examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies and relationships between peoples.
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.2.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.AH.2.CC.B. Compare factors motivating Europeans to explore and settle in the New World to explain colonial diversity and regional differences in North and South America.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.CC.C. Trace the causes and consequences of conflict and cooperation between Native Americans and North and South American colonists using multiple viewpoints.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.CC.D. Describe the causes and consequences of the Seven Years War as a turning point in American history.
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.CC.E. Analyze the concept of Manifest Destiny as a catalyst for change in American history.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.3.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.AH.3.CC.A. Trace the events leading to escalating conflict between Great Britain and the colonies, from multiple viewpoints.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.CC.B. Analyze the Declaration of Independence to determine the historical context and political philosophies that influenced its creation.
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.CC.C. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the American colonies and Great Britain to explain the American victory in the Revolution.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.CC.D. Explain the major debates that occurred during the adoption of the Constitution and their ultimate resolution.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.CC.E. Evaluate the responses of early American leaders to the social, political, economic and religious. challenges facing the new nation.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.4.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.AH.4.CC.A. Analyze the expansion of the United States in the early nineteenth century to trace U.S. growth and form hypotheses about future conflicts.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.CC.B. Evaluate the responses of North and South American leaders to the social, political, economic and religious. challenges of the period.
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.CC.C. Analyze the forced removal and resettlements of Native Americans to determine its impact on their cultures and civilizations.
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.5. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.5.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.AH.5.CC.A. Analyze political compromises over slavery in the territories to explain intensifying sectional conflicts.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.CC.B. Trace the events as well as political, cultural, economic and social conditions leading to conflict between Northern and Southern states.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.CC.C. Describe critical developments and turning points in the Civil War, including major battles.
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.2.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.AH.2.GS.A. Compare the governmental systems of European powers to determine their effect on colonization in the Americas.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.GS.B. Explain how the founding of English colonies influenced their governments and expectations for self- rule.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
6-8.AH.2.GS.C. Analyze local and colonial governments to trace the factors influencing their structure and function.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3

6-8.AH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.3.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.AH.3.GS.A. Evaluate the impact of the French and Indian Wars on Great Britain’s approach to colonial rule.
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.B. Apply the concept of representation to the conflict between the colonies and Great Britain.
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.C. Apply the principles of inalienable rights, popular sovereignty, natural rights, and social contract to evaluate the purpose and legacy of the Declaration of Independence.
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.D. Evaluate the successes and challenges of the Articles of Confederation to explain the need for a Constitutional Convention.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.E. Apply the principles of rule of law, representation, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism to explain the purposes and functions of the Constitution.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.F. Describe the origins and purposes of the Bill of Rights and evaluate the enduring significance of these concepts to the preservation of individual rights and liberties.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.GS.G. Examine elections, issues, laws, and events of this time period to explain how the concepts of judicial review, elastic clause, and an amendment process were established or used to meet challenges.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.4.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.AH.4.GS.A. Trace the expansion of voting rights and patterns and explain how it impacted elections and political movements.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.GS.B. Analyze landmark Supreme Court cases to determine the effect on the definition and expansion of federal power.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.GS.C. Explain how the principles of rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism were impacted by Jacksonian Democracy.
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.5. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.5.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.AH.5.GS.A. Compare responses of government systems in the North and South to major legislation, executive orders, and court decisions before, during and immediately after the Civil War.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.GS.B. Analyze federalism and popular sovereignty to explain peoples’ expectations of the role of government and their place in governance.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.GS.C. Analyze the election of 1860 to explain the development of political parties and how they influence the selection of leaders.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.2.G. Geographical Study
6-8.AH.2.G.A. Analyze diverse Native American cultures in North, Central and South America to explain the ways they adapted to their various. environments.
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.G.B. Analyze the geography of colonial regions to explain their cultural, social and economic differences.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.G.C. Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.3.G. Geographical Study
6-8.AH.3.G.B. Evaluate the relationships among population, representation, and their effect on power in the new government.
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.G.C. Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics and migrations in the United States during this era c. 1763-1812.
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.4.G. Geographical Study
6-8.AH.4.G.A. Trace the changing boundaries of the United States and describe how it represents the changing relationships with its neighbors and Native Americans.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.G.B. Assess Manifest Destiny in relation to push-pull factors, geographic features, and human environmental interactions to determine their influence on the movement of goods, people and ideas.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.G.C. Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life c.1812-1848.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.5. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.5.G. Geographical Study
6-8.AH.5.G.A. Analyze the United States ‘geography of North, South, and West in order to explain regional cultural, social and economic differences.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.G.B. Evaluate the significance of geography on the conduct of the war and strategy of the North and South.
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.G.C. Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.2.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.AH.2.EC.A. Compare sources of labor, emerging economic production, and availability of land in the New World and their impact on economic development in North and South America.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3

6-8.AH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.3.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.AH.3.EC.A. Describe the function and purpose of taxes imposed by Great Britain following the Seven Years War, evaluating colonial responses to them.
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.EC.B. Compare the emerging economic characteristics of the nation and colonial regions to make predictions about future expansion and conflict.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
6-8.AH.3.EC.C. Trace the development of the American economic system to explain how taxes, tariffs, and monetary policies were used to establish sustainability and growth.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.4.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.AH.4.EC.A. Analyze the origins and characteristics of coercive labor systems, including slavery, and their impact on economic and political expansion.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.EC.B. Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship among those regions.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.5. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.5.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.AH.5.EC.A. Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation, and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship among those regions.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.EC.B. Compare the economic strengths and weaknesses of the North and South before, during and immediately after the Civil War.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.2.PC. People, Groups, and Cultures
6-8.AH.2.PC.A. Analyze the religious., cultural, political and intellectual developments of Spanish, Portuguese, British and French regions to explain the development of diverse cultures throughout the Americas.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.PC.B. Analyze the religious, cultural, and intellectual developments of the European colonies to explain the development of regionalism and an American identity
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.2.PC.C. Compare and contrast the interaction of European settlers with Native Americans in both North and South America.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.3.PC. People, Groups, and Cultures
6-8.AH.3.PC.A. Analyze the perspectives of diverse individuals and groups to explain the extent of their support for the Revolutionary War.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.PC.B. Analyze populations of colonies/states to explain how their cultural, religious, social, and economic characteristics influenced the emergence of regional identity.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.PC.C. Compare and contrast the perspectives of individuals and groups regarding the development of the American governmental system to explain emerging divisions and political philosophies.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.3.PC.D. Evaluate laws, events, and perspectives to determine the extent to which individuals and groups could participate in, and realize, the promise of American ideals.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
6-8.AH.3.PC.E. Analyze the artistic and intellectual achievements of early Americans to provide evidence of an emerging American identity.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.4.PC. People, Groups, and Cultures
6-8.AH.4.PC.A. Evaluate the effectiveness of various. reform movements, laws, and events to determine their impact on the promise of American ideals.
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.4.PC.B. Analyze the experiences of enslaved peoples in North and South America to determine their cultural impact and consequences.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.AH.5. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.AH.5.PC. People, Groups, and Cultures
6-8.AH.5.PC.A. Determine the impact of the ideas contained in major speeches, literature, music, and writings from diverse individuals on the perspectives of American people, groups and movements.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.PC.B. Describe the impact of scientific and technological advances on the outcome of the war and its effect on people and diverse groups.
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.PC.C. Analyze the evolution of the women’s movement to trace its continued development and evaluate its impact.
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.AH.5.PC.D. Analyze the evolution of the Abolitionist Movement to trace its continued development and evaluate its impact.
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MO.6-8.WH. World History

6-8.WH.1. Tools of Social Science Inquiry

6-8.WH.1.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.WH.1.CC.A. Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of related events in world history.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.CC.B. Explain connections between historical context and peoples’ perspectives at the time in world history
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.CC.E. Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific problem in world history prior to c. 1450 as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.GS. Government Systems and Principals
6-8.WH.1.GS.A. Analyze laws, policies, and processes to determine how governmental systems affect individuals and groups in society in world history prior to c.1450.
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.G. Geographic Study
6-8.WH.1.G.B. Describe the impact of human settlement activities on the environmental and cultural characteristics of world regions prior to c. 1450.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.G.C. Locate major cities of the world and key world nations; the world’s continents, and oceans; and major topographical features of the world.
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.WH.1.EC.A. Using a world history lens, examine the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals prior to c. 1450.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.1.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6.8.WH.1.PC.A. Using a world history lens, describe how peoples’ perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.2.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.WH.2.CC.B. Analyze the role early civilizations had in shaping concepts of government, law, and social order.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.3.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.WH.3.CC.A. Analyze the rise and fall of classical civilizations to determine their significance to future societies.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.CC.B. Trace the impact of conflicts, competition, and cooperation within and among classical civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.4.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.WH.4.CC.A. Compare how the collapse of government and resulting instability led to the development of feudal kingdoms in Europe and Japan.
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.4.CC.C. Analyze how the Crusades and Black Death affected existing societies in Europe, Asia and Africa.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.4.CC.D. Analyze the cultures of civilizations in sub-Saharan Africa, Mesoamerica, and Andean South America.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.2.GS . Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.WH.2.GS .A. Explain the origins, functions, and structure of monarchies, theocracies, city states, empires and dynasties.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.2.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.WH.2.GS.B. Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of subjects and political leaders in monarchies, theocracies, city-states, and empires.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.3.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.WH.3.GS.A. Explain the origins, functions, and structure of governmental systems within classical civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.GS.B. Analyze direct democracy and representative democracy in order to apply the concepts of majority rule, minority rights and civic duty.
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.GS.C. Explain how the rule of law developed from a written code of laws as well as concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.4.GS. Governmental Systems and Principles
6-8.WH.4.GS.A. Explain the origins, functions, and structure of governmental systems within civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.4.GS.B. Explain how the rule of law is further developed by the Magna Carta, and other documents including limited government and due process.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.2.G. Geographical Study
6-8.WH.2.G.A. Describe how physical characteristics of river valleys supported permanent settlements and the rise of early civilizations.
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.2.G.B. Analyze the cultural characteristics of civilizations to explain how they are similar and different.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.2.G.C. Explain how various. characteristics of civilizations are connected to identities and cultures.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.3.G. Geographical Study
6-8.WH.3.G.A. Explain the significance of physical geography to the development of classical civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.2.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.WH.2.EC.A. Using a world history lens, explain how the concept of economic surplus. led to trade and the emergence of specialized labor
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.2.EC.B. Explain how standardization affects the early stability of a society.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.3.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.WH.3.EC.A. Describe trade patterns and how they influence the movement of resources, goods and services.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.EC.B. Explain how standardization impacts the stability of a civilization.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.EC.C. Explain how political and economic stability affects the well-being of individuals and society.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.2.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.WH.2.PC.A. Explain the significance of monotheistic and polytheistic religions to the social and political order of early civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.3. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.3.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.WH.3.PC.A. Explain the significance of art, mythology, literature and philosophy to the culture and social order of classical civilizations
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.PC.B. Analyze scientific, technological, intellectual, and artistic advancements to determine the legacy of the classical civilizations.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.WH.3.PC.C. Analyze the extent and impact of cultural diffusion that results from empire building.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

6-8.WH.4. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.WH.4.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.WH.4.PC.A. Analyze scientific, technological, intellectual, and artistic advancements to determine the legacy of European, African and Mesoamerican civilizations.
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MO.6-8.GEO. Geography

6-8.GEO.1. Tools of Social Science Inquiry

6-8.GEO.1.CC. History: Continuity and Change
6-8.GEO.1.CC.A. Create and use historical maps and timelines in order to represent continuity and change within and among regions over time.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.CC.B. Evaluate historical solutions to problems within and among world regions in order to draw conclusions about current and future decisions.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.G. Geographic Study
6-8.GEO.1.G.A. Create and use maps, graphs, statistics, and geo-spatial technology in order to explain relationships and reveal spatial patterns or trends
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.G.C. Locate the states of the United States and corresponding regions
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
States and Capitals
What is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.G.F. Locate the major landforms of the world.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.GEO.1.PC.B. Explain how the physical and human characteristics of places and regions are connected to human identities and cultures.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.1.PC.C. Compare and contrast the human characteristics within and among contemporary and historic regions over time.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.GEO.2. Key concepts and Understandings

6-8.GEO.2.G. Geographical Study
6-8.GEO.2.G.C. Explain how human-environmental interactions shape people and places.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Resources & Energy
Energy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.CC. Economic Concepts
6-8.GEO.2.EC.B. Analyze patterns of resource distribution to explain the consequences of personal and public economic decisions.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.EC.C. Use economic concepts such as GDP, scarcity, inflation, to describe and compare places and regions.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.EC.D. Analyze economic systems to explain their impact on peoples’ behavior and choices.
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.PC. People, Groups and Cultures
6-8.GEO.2.PC.A. Compare and contrast the human characteristics within and among regions.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.PC.C. Analyze the relationship between the physical environments and cultural traditions to determine their impact on individuals, groups, and institutions.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.GEO.2.PC.D. Analyze religion and belief systems of a place to determine their varying impact on people, groups, and cultures.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

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