U.S. National Standards for Sixth Grade Social Studies

Panama Canal
The Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

N.NCSS. National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies (NCSS)

NCSS.1. CULTURE

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY.
1.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
1.1.1. 'Culture'' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of living together of a group of people.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.1.2. Concepts such as beliefs, values, institutions, cohesion, diversity, accommodation, adaptation, assimilation, and dissonance.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
1.1.3. How culture influences the ways in which human groups solve the problems of daily living.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.1.4. That the beliefs, values, and behaviors of a culture form an integrated system that helps shape the activities and ways of life that define a culture.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
1.1.6. That culture may change in response to changing needs, concerns, social, political, and geographic conditions.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
1.1.7. How people from different cultures develop different values and ways of interpreting experience.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.1.8. That language, behaviors, and beliefs of different cultures can both contribute to and pose barriers to cross--cultural understanding.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
1.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
1.2.1. Ask and find answers to questions related to culture.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.2.7. Draw inferences from data about the ways in which given cultures respond to persistent human issues, and how culture influences those responses.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3

NCSS.2. TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF THE PAST AND ITS LEGACY.
2.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
2.1.1. The study of the past provides a representation of the history of communities, nations, and the world.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.2. Concepts such as: chronology, causality, change, conflict, complexity, multiple perspectives, primary and secondary sources, and cause and effect.
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.3. That learning about the past requires the interpretation of sources, and that using varied sources provides the potential for a more balanced interpretive record of the past.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.4. That historical interpretations of the same event may differ on the basis of such factors as conflicting evidence from varied sources, national or cultural perspectives, and the point of view of the researcher.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.5. Key historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures (e.g., the rise and fall of ancient civilizations, the development of technology, the rise of modern nation-states, and the establishment and breakdown of colonial systems).
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.1.6. The origins and influences of social, cultural, political, and economic systems.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.7. The contributions of key persons, groups, and events from the past and their influence on the present.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.1.8. The history of democratic ideals and principles, and how they are represented in documents, artifacts and symbols.
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.1.9. The influences of social, geographic, economic, and cultural factors an the history of local areas, states, nations, and the world.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
2.2.1. Formulate questions about topics in history, predict possible answers, and use historical methods of inquiry and literacy skills to locate, organize, analyze, and interpret sources, and present supported findings.
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
2.2.2. Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.2.3. Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources (e.g., documents, letters, artifacts, and testimony) as well as secondary sources; validate and weigh evidence for claims, and evaluate the usefulness and degree of reliability of sources to develop a supportable interpretation.
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.3. PRODUCTS - Learners demonstrate understanding by:
2.3.6. Developing an illustrated timeline of a sequence of events representing an important historic era.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

NCSS.3. PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS.
3.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
3.1.1. The theme of people, places, and environments involves the study of the relationships between human populations in different locations and geographic phenomena such as climate, vegetation, and natural resources.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Resources & Energy
Energy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.2. Concerts such as: location, region, place, and migration, as well as human and physical systems.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.3. Past and present changes in physical systems, such as seasons, climate, and weather, and the water cycle, in both national and global contexts.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.5. The concept of regions identifies links between people in different locations according to specific criteria (e.g., physical, economic, social, cultural, or religious).
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.6. Patterns of demographic and political change, and cultural diffusion in the past and present (e.g., changing national boundaries, migration, and settlement, and the diffusion of and changes in customs and ideas).
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.7. Human modifications of the environment.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Resources & Energy
Energy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.8. Factors that contribute to cooperation and conflict among peoples of the nation and world, including language, religion, and political beliefs.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.1.9. The use of a variety of maps, globes, graphic representations, and geospatial technologies to help investigate the relationships among people, places, and environments.
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
3.2.1. Ask and find answers to geographic questions related to regions, nations, and the world in the past and present.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.2.2. Research, organize, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information from atlases, data bases, grid systems, charts, graphs, maps, geospatial technologies, and other tools to interpret relationships among geographic factors and historic events.
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.2.5. Identify and interpret ''push'' and ''pull'' factors involved in the migrations of people in this nation and other parts of the world.
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.2.6. Evaluate the consequences of human actions in environmental terms.
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.3. PRODUCTS - Learners demonstrate understanding by:
3.3.2. Constructing a map depicting the historical expansion of a nation or empire that demonstrates an understanding of relative location, distance, direction, boundaries, major physical features, size, and shape.
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.3.6. Graphing patterns of human migration in a selected place on the globe.
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSS.5. INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INSTITUTIONS

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF INTERACTIONS AMONG INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INSTITUTIONS.
5.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
5.1.2. Concepts such as: mores, norms, status, role, socialization, ethnocentrism, cultural diffusion, competition, cooperation, conflict, race, ethnicity, and gender.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.5. That groups and institutions change over time.
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.8. That when two or more groups with differing norms and beliefs interact, accommodation or conflict may result.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.9. That groups and institutions influence culture in a variety of ways.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
5.2.2. Analyze the effects of interactions between and among individuals, groups, and institutions.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.2.3. Identify and analyze the impact of tensions between and among individuals, groups, and institutions.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.2.6. Analyze the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change.
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1

NCSS.6. POWER, AUTHORITY, AND GOVERNANCE

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF HOW PEOPLE CREATE, INTERACT WITH, AND CHANGE STRUCTURES OF POWER, AUTHORITY, AND GOVERNANCE.
6.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
6.1.1. Rights are guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution, the supreme law of the land.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.1.2. Fundamental ideas that are the foundation of American constitutional democracy (including those of the U.S. Constitution, popular sovereignty, the rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, minority rights, the separation of church and state, and Federalism).
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.1.3. Fundamental values of constitutional democracy (e.g., the common good, liberty, justice, equality, and individual dignity).
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.1.4. The ideologies and structures of political systems that differ from those of the United States.
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.1.5. The ways in which governments meet the needs and wants of citizens, manage conflict, and establish order and security.
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
6.2.1. Ask and find answers to questions about power, authority and governance in the region, nation, and world.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
6.2.2. Examine persistent issues involving the rights of individuals and groups in relation to the general welfare.
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
6.2.3. Compare and analyze the ways in which groups and nations respond to the richness of unity and diversity, as well as tensions and conflicts associated with unity and diversity.
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6.2.4. Analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation among groups and nations.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
6.2.5. Evaluate the role of technology as it contributes to conflict and cooperation among nations and groups, and as it contributes to or detracts from systems of power, authority, and governance.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

NCSS.7. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF HOW PEOPLE ORGANIZE FOR THE PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES.
7.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
7.1.1. Individuals, government, and society experience scarcity because human wants and needs exceed what can be produced from available resources.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
7.1.7. How markets bring buyers and sellers together to exchange goods and services.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.1.8. How goods and services are allocated in a market economy through the influence of prices on decisions about production and consumption.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSS.8. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY.
8.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
8.1.2. Society often turns to science and technology to solve problems.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.1.4. Science and technology have had both positive and negative impacts upon individuals, societies, and the environment in the past and present.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.1.5. Science and technology have changed peoples' perceptions of the social and natural world, as well as their relationship to the land, economy and trade, their concept of security, and their major daily activities.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.1.6. Values, beliefs, and attitudes that have been influenced by new scientific and technological knowledge (e.g., invention of the printing press, conceptions of the universe, applications of atomic energy, and genetic discoveries).
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
8.2.1. Ask and find answers to questions about the ways in which science and technology affect peoples' lives today in different places, and have done so in the past.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.2.3. Seek and evaluate varied perspectives when weighing how specific applications of science and technology have impacted individuals and society.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.2.4. Review sources to identify the purposes, points of view, biases, and intended audiences of reports and discussions of science and technology.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.2.5. Select, organize, evaluate, and communicate information about the impact of science or technology on a society today or in the past.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
8.3. PRODUCTS - Learners demonstrate understanding by:
8.3.1. Discussing current and past issues involving science and technology, and their consequences for society.
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3

NCSS.9. GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF GLOBAL CONNECTIONS AND INTERDEPENDENCE.
9.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
9.1.1. Global connections have existed in the past and increased rapidly in current times.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
9.1.2. Global factors such as cultural, economic, and political connections are changing the places in which people live (e.g., through trade, migration, increased travel, and communication).
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
9.1.5. Global connections may make cultures more alike or increase their sense of distinctiveness.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
9.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
9.2.1. Ask and find answers to questions about the ways in which people and societies are connected globally today and were connected in the past.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
9.2.2. Use maps, charts, and databases to explore patterns and predict trends regarding global connections at the community, state, or national level.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
9.2.3. Investigate and explain the ways in which aspects of culture, such as language, beliefs, and traditions, may facilitate understanding, or lead to misunderstanding between cultures.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
9.2.4. Analyze examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, com-munities, regions, societies, and nations.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
9.2.7. Describe and explain the relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and global interests in such matters as territorial rights, natural resources, trade, the different uses of technology, and the welfare of people.
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSS.10. CIVIC IDEALS AND PRACTICES

SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAMS SHOULD INCLUDE EXPERIENCES THAT PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF THE IDEALS, PRINCIPLES, AND PRACTICES OF CITIZENSHIP IN A DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC.
10.1. KNOWLEDGE - Learners will understand:
10.1.2. Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
10.1.3. Key practices involving the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the exercise of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rule of law and due process, voting, serving on a jury, researching issues, making informed judgments, expressing views on issues, and collaborating with others to take civic action).
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
10.1.5. Key documents and excerpts from key sources that define and support democratic ideals and practices (e.g., the U.S. Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Gettysburg Address, the Letter from Birmingham Jail; and international documents such as the Declaration of the Rights of Man, and the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Children).
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
10.1.6. The origins and function of major institutions and practices developed to support democratic ideals and practices.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
10.1.7. Key past and present issues involving democratic ideals and practices, as well as the perspectives of various stakeholders in proposing possible solutions to these issues.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
10.2. PROCESSES - Learners will be able to:
10.2.2. Identify and describe the role of citizen in various forms of government, past and present.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
10.2.3. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of various forms of civic action influencing public policy decisions that address the realization of civic ideals.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

N.NSCG. National Standards for Civics and Government (NSCG)

I.A. What are civic life, politics, and government? What is civic life? What is politics? What is government? Why are government and politics necessary? What purposes should government serve?

I.A.1. Defining civic life, politics, and government. Students should be able to explain the meaning of the terms civic life, politics, and government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.A.1.2. Describe politics as the ways people whose ideas may differ reach agreements that are generally regarded as binding on the group, e.g., presenting information and evidence, stating arguments, negotiating, compromising, voting
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
I.A.1.5. Identify institutions with authority to direct or control the behavior of members of a society, e.g., a school board, city council, state legislature, courts, Congress
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.A.2. Necessity and purposes of government. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on why government is necessary and the purposes government should serve. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.A.2.2. Evaluate competing ideas about the purposes government should serve, e.g.,
I.A.2.2.e. Furthering the interests of a particular class or group
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
I.A.2.2.f. Promoting a particular religion
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

I.B. What are civic life, politics, and government? What are the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited government?

I.B.1. Limited and unlimited governments. Students should be able to describe the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited governments. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.B.1.1. Describe the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited governments
I.B.1.1.a. Limited governments have established and respected restraints on their power, e.g., constitutional governments--governments characterized by legal limits on political power
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.B.1.1.b. Unlimited governments are those in which there are no effective means of restraining their power, e.g. authoritarian systems--governments in which political power is concentrated in one person or a small group, and individuals and groups are subordinated to that power; totalitarian systems--modern forms of extreme authoritarianism in which the government attempts to control every aspect of the lives of individuals and prohibits independent associations
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.B.1.2. Identify historical and contemporary examples of limited and unlimited governments and justify their classification, e.g.,
I.B.1.2.a. Limited governments--United States, Great Britain, Botswana, Japan, Israel, Chile
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
I.B.1.2.b. Unlimited governments--Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan, Spain under Franco, Argentina under Peron, Iraq under Hussein, Iran
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

I.C. What are civic life, politics, and government? What are the nature and purposes of constitutions?

I.C.1. Concepts of ''constitution.'' Students should be able to explain alternative uses of the term constitution'' and to distinguish between governments with a constitution and a constitutional government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.C.1.1. Distinguish among the following uses of the term constitution
I.C.1.1.b. Constitution as a document
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.1.1.c. Constitution as a higher law limiting the powers of government, i.e., a constitutional or limited government
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.1.2. Identify historical and contemporary nations with constitutions that in reality do not limit power, e.g., former Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, Iraq under Saddam Hussein
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.1.3. Identify historical and contemporary nations with constitutions that in reality do limit power, e.g., United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Botswana, Chile
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.2. Purposes and uses of constitutions. Students should be able to explain the various purposes constitutions serve. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.C.2.1. Explain how constitutions
I.C.2.1.a. Set forth the purposes of government
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.2.1.b. Describe the way a government is organized and how power is allocated
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.2.1.c. Define the relationship between a people and their government
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.C.2.3. Describe historical and contemporary examples of how constitutions have been used to protect individual rights and promote the common good, e.g., United States Constitution ''Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, (First Amendment) ...,'' ''The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied...on account of sex (Nineteenth Amendment).''
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

I.D. What are civic life, politics, and government? What are alternative ways of organizing constitutional governments?

I.D.1. Shared powers and parliamentary systems. Students should be able to describe the major characteristics of systems of shared powers and of parliamentary systems. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.D.1.1. Describe the major characteristics of systems of shared powers, e.g., in the United States
I.D.1.1.a. The president and members of the Cabinet cannot be members of Congress
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
I.D.1.1.b. Powers are separated among branches, each branch has primary responsibility for certain functions, e.g., legislative, executive, and judicial
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.D.1.1.c. Each branch also shares the powers and functions of the other branches, e.g., Congress may pass laws, but the president may veto them; the president nominates certain public officials, but the Senate needs to approve them; Congress may pass laws, but the Supreme Court may declare them unconstitutional
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
I.D.2. Confederal, federal, and unitary systems. Students should be able to explain the advantages and disadvantages of confederal, federal, and unitary systems of government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
I.D.2.2. Identify examples of confederal, federal, and unitary systems in the history of the United States, e.g.,
I.D.2.2.a. Confederal system--the United States under the Articles of Confederation and the Confederate States of America
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
I.D.2.2.c. Unitary system--state governments of the United States
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
I.D.2.3. Explain the major advantages and disadvantages of confederal, federal, and unitary systems
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

II.A. What are the foundations of the American political system? What is the American idea of constitutional government?

II.A.1. The American idea of constitutional government. Students should be able to explain the essential ideas of American constitutional government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.A.1.1. Explain essential ideas of American constitutional government as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other writings, e.g.,
II.A.1.1.a. The people are sovereign; they are the ultimate source of power
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.A.1.1.b. The Constitution is a higher law that authorizes a government of limited powers
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.1.c. The purposes of government, as stated in the Preamble to the Constitution, are to form a more perfect union; establish justice; insure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; promote the general welfare; secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.2. Explain how the following provisions of the United States Constitution give government the power it needs to fulfill the purposes for which it was established
II.A.1.2.a. Delegated or enumerated powers, e.g., to lay and collect taxes, to make treaties, to decide cases and controversies between two or more states (Articles I, II & III)
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.2.b. The general welfare provision (Article I, Section 8)
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.2.c. The necessary and proper clause (Article I, Section 8, Clause 18)
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.3. Explain the means of limiting the powers of government under the United States Constitution
II.A.1.3.a. Separation and sharing of powers
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
II.A.1.3.b. Checks and balances
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
II.A.1.3.c. Bill of Rights
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.4. Explain how specific provisions of the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, limit the powers of government in order to protect the rights of individuals, e.g., habeas corpus; trial by jury; ex post facto; freedom of religion, speech, press, and assembly; equal protection of the law; due process of law; right to counsel
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.5. Evaluate, take, and defend positions on current issues involving constitutional protection of individual rights, such as
II.A.1.5.a. Limits on speech, e.g., ''hate speech,'' advertising, libel and slander, ''fighting words''
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.A.1.5.b. Separation of church and state, e.g., school vouchers, prayer in public schools
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.5.c. Cruel and unusual punishment, e.g., death penalty
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.A.1.5.d. Search and seizure, e.g., warrantless searches
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.A.1.5.e. Privacy, e.g., fingerprinting of children, national identification cards, wiretapping, DNA banks
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

II.B. What are the foundations of the American political system? What are the distinctive characteristics of American society?

II.B.1. Distinctive characteristics of American society. Students should be able to identify and explain the importance of historical experience and geographic, social, and economic factors that have helped to shape American society. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.B.1.1. Explain important factors that have helped shape American society
II.B.1.1.b. Religious freedom
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.B.1.1.d. A history of slavery
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.B.1.1.g. Social, economic, and geographic mobility
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.B.1.1.h. Effects of a frontier
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.B.1.1.i. Large scale immigration
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.B.1.1.m. Market economy
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.B.3. Diversity in American society. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on the value and challenges of diversity in American life. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.B.3.3. Explain why conflicts have arisen from diversity, using historical and contemporary examples, e.g., North/South conflict; conflict about land, suffrage, and other rights of Native Americans; Catholic/Protestant conflicts in the nineteenth century; conflict about civil rights of minorities and women; present day ethnic conflict in urban settings
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.B.3.4. Evaluate ways conflicts about diversity can be resolved in a peaceful manner that respects individual rights and promotes the common good
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

II.C. What are the foundations of the American political system? What is American political culture?

II.C.1. American identity. Students should be able to explain the importance of shared political values and principles to American society. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.C.1.1. Explain that an American's identity stems from belief in and allegiance to shared political values and principles rather than from ethnicity, race, religion, class, language, gender, or national origin, which determine identity in most other nations
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.C.1.2. Identify basic values and principles Americans share as set forth in such documents as the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Gettysburg Address
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.C.1.3. Explain why it is important to the individual and society that Americans understand and act on their shared political values and principles
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.C.2. The character of American political conflict. Students should be able to describe the character of American political conflict and explain factors that usually prevent violence or that lower its intensity. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.C.2.1. Describe political conflict in the United States both historically and at present, such as conflict about
II.C.2.1.a. Geographic and sectional interests
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.C.2.1.b. Slavery and indentured servitude
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.C.2.1.d. Extending the franchise
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.C.2.1.f. The role of religion in American public life
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.C.2.1.g. Engaging in wars
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.C.2.2. Explain some of the reasons why political conflict in the United States, with notable exceptions such as the Civil War, labor unrest, civil rights struggles, and the opposition to the war in Vietnam generally has been less divisive than in many other nations. These include
II.C.2.2.a. A shared respect for the Constitution and its principles
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.C.2.2.c. Many opportunities to influence government and to participate in it
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.C.2.2.e. Acceptance of the idea of majority rule tempered by a respect for minority rights
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

II.D. What are the foundations of the American political system? What values and principles are basic to American constitutional democracy?

II.D.1. Fundamental values and principles. Students should be able to explain the meaning and importance of the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.1.1. Identify fundamental values and principles as expressed in
II.D.1.1.a. Basic documents, e.g., Declaration of Independence and United States Constitution
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.1.1.b. Significant political speeches and writings, e.g., The Federalist, Washington's Farewell Address, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, King's ''I Have a Dream'' speech
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.1.1.c. Individual and group actions that embody fundamental values and principles, e.g., suffrage and civil rights movements
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.1.2. Explain the meaning and importance of each of the following values considered to be fundamental to American public life
II.D.1.2.d. Justice
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.1.2.e. Equality
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.1.2.g. Openness and free inquiry
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.1.2.h. Truth
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.1.3. Explain the meaning and importance of the following fundamental principles of American constitutional democracy
II.D.1.3.a. Popular sovereignty--the concept that ultimate political authority rests with the people who create and can alter or abolish governments
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.1.3.b. Constitutional government which includes the rule of law; representative institutions; shared powers; checks and balances; individual rights; separation of church and state; federalism; civilian control of the military
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.2. Conflicts among values and principles in American political and social life. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues in which fundamental values and principles are in conflict. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.2.1. Describe conflicts among fundamental values and principles and give historical and contemporary examples of these conflicts, such as
II.D.2.1.a. Conflicts between liberty and equality, e.g., liberty to exclude others from private clubs and the right of individuals to be treated equally
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.2.2. Explain why people may agree on values or principles in the abstract but disagree when they are applied to specific issues
II.D.2.2.a. Agreement on the value of freedom of expression but disagreement about the extent to which expression of unpopular and offensive views should be tolerated, e.g., neo-Nazi demonstrations, racial slurs, profanity, lyrics that advocate violence
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
II.D.3. Disparities between ideals and reality in American political and social life. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues concerning ways and means to reduce disparities between American ideals and realities. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
II.D.3.1. Identify some important American ideals, e.g., liberty and justice for all, an informed citizenry, civic virtue or concern for the common good, respect for the rights of others
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.3.2. Explain the importance of ideals as goals, even if they are not fully achieved
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.3.3. Explain, using historical and contemporary examples, discrepancies between American ideals and the realities of political and social life in the United States, e.g., the ideal of equal justice for all and the reality that the poor may not have equal access to the judicial system.
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
II.D.3.4. Describe historical and contemporary efforts to reduce discrepancies between ideals and the reality of American public life, e.g., abolition, suffrage, civil rights, and environmental protection movements
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
II.D.3.5. Explain ways in which discrepancies between reality and the ideals of American constitutional democracy can be reduced by
II.D.3.5.a. Individual action
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
II.D.3.5.c. Political action
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

III.A. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution?

III.A.1. Distributing, sharing, and limiting powers of the national government. Students should be able to explain how the powers of the national government are distributed, shared, and limited. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.A.1.1. Explain how the three opening words of the Preamble to the Constitution, ''We the People...,'' embody the principle of the people as sovereign--the ultimate source of authority
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.2. Explain how legislative, executive, and judicial powers are distributed and shared among the three branches of the national government
III.A.1.2.a. Legislative power--although primary legislative power lies with Congress, it is shared with the other branches, e.g., the executive branch can submit bills for consideration and can establish regulations, the Supreme Court can interpret laws and can declare them unconstitutional
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.2.b. Executive power--although primary executive power is with the executive branch, it is shared by the other branches, e.g., congressional committees have authority to review actions of the executive branch, the Senate must approve appointments and ratify treaties, the Supreme Court can review actions of the executive branch and declare them unconstitutional
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.2.c. Judicial power--although primary judicial power is with the federal judiciary, it is shared with other branches, e.g., the president appoints federal judges, the Senate can approve or refuse to confirm federal court appointees, the executive branch can hold administrative hearings on compliance with regulations and laws, Congress can ''overturn'' a Supreme Court interpretation of a law by amending it
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.3. Explain how each branch of government can check the powers of the other branches
III.A.1.3.a. Legislative branch has the power to establish committees to oversee activities of the executive branch; impeach the president, other members of the executive branch, and federal judges; pass laws over the president's veto by two-thirds majority vote of both Houses; disapprove appointments made by the president; propose amendments to the United States Constitution
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.3.b. Executive branch has the power to veto laws passed by Congress; nominate members of the federal judiciary
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.1.3.c. Judicial branch has the power to overrule decisions made by lower courts; declare laws made by Congress to be unconstitutional; declare actions of the executive branch to be unconstitutional
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.A.2. Sharing of powers between the national and state governments. Students should be able to explain how and why powers are distributed and shared between national and state governments in the federal system. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.A.2.1. Identify the major parts of the federal system
III.A.2.1.a. National government
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.1.b. State governments
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.1.c. Other governmental units, e.g., District of Columbia; American tribal governments; territories of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa; Virgin Islands
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.2. Describe how some powers are shared between the national and state governments, e.g., power to tax, borrow money, regulate voting
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.3. Describe functions commonly and primarily exercised by state governments, e.g., education, law enforcement, health and hospitals, roads and highways
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.4. Identify powers prohibited to state governments by the United States Constitution, e.g., coining money, conducting foreign relations, interfering with interstate commerce, raising an army and declaring war (Article I, Section 10)
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.A.2.5. Explain how and why the United States Constitution provides that laws of the national government and treaties are the supreme law of the land
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

III.B. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? What does the national government do?

III.B.1. Major responsibilities for domestic and foreign policy. Students should be able to explain the major responsibilities of the national government for domestic and foreign policy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.B.1.1. Identify historical and contemporary examples of important domestic policies, e.g., Pure Food and Drug Act, Environmental Protection Act, civil rights laws, child labor laws, minimum wage laws, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Social Security
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.B.1.2. Explain how and why domestic policies affect their lives
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.B.1.3. Identify historical and contemporary examples of important foreign policies, e.g., Monroe Doctrine, Marshall Plan, immigration acts, foreign aid, arms control, promoting democracy and human rights throughout the world
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.B.2. Financing government through taxation. Students should be able to explain the necessity of taxes and the purposes for which taxes are used. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.B.2.1. Explain why taxation is necessary to pay for government
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.B.2.2. Identify provisions of the United States Constitution that authorize the national government to collect taxes, i.e., Article One, Sections 7 and 8; Sixteenth Amendment
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.B.2.3. Identify major sources of revenue for the national government, e.g., individual income taxes, social insurance receipts (Social Security and Medicare), borrowing, taxes on corporations and businesses, estate and excise taxes, tariffs on foreign goods
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.B.2.4. Identify major uses of tax revenues received by the national government, e.g., direct payment to individuals (Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), national defense, interest on the federal debt, interstate highways
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

III.C. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? How are state and local governments organized and what do they do?

III.C.1. State governments. Students should be able to explain why states have constitutions, their purposes, and the relationship of state constitutions to the federal constitution. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.C.1.3. Identify and explain the basic similarities and differences between their state constitution and the United States Constitution
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.C.1.4. Explain why state constitutions and state governments cannot violate the United States Constitution
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.C.2. Organization and responsibilities of state and local governments. Students should be able to describe the organization and major responsibilities of state and local governments. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.C.2.1. Identify major responsibilities of their state and local governments, e.g., education, welfare, streets and roads, parks, recreation, and law enforcement
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.C.2.2. Describe the organization of their state and local governments, e.g., legislative, executive, and judicial functions at state and local levels
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.C.2.3. Identify major sources of revenue for state and local governments, e.g., property, sales, and income taxes; fees and licenses; taxes on corporations and businesses; borrowing
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.C.2.4. Explain why state and local governments have an important effect on their own lives
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3

III.D. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? Who represents you in local, state, and national governments?

III.D.1. Who represents you in legislative and executive branches of your local, state, and national governments? Students should be able to identify their representatives in the legislative branches as well as the heads of the executive branches of their local, state, and national governments. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.D.1.1. Name the persons representing them at state and national levels in the legislative branches of government, i.e., representatives and senators in their state legislature and in Congress
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.D.1.2. Name the persons representing them at local, state, and national levels in the executive branches of government, e.g., mayor, governor, president
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3

III.E. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? What is the place of law in the American constitutional system?

III.E.3. Judicial protection of the rights of individuals. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on current issues regarding judicial protection of individual rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.E.3.1. Explain the basic concept of due process of law, i.e., government must use fair procedures to gather information and make decisions in order to protect the rights of individuals and the interests of society
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2. Explain the importance to individuals and to society of major due process protections
III.E.3.2.a. Habeas corpus
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.b. Presumption of innocence
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.c. Fair notice
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.d. Impartial tribunal
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.e. Speedy and public trials
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.f. Right to counsel
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.g. Trial by jury
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.h. Right against self-incrimination
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.i. Protection against double jeopardy
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.2.j. Right of appeal
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
III.E.3.3. Explain why due process rights in administrative and legislative procedures are essential for the protection of individual rights and the maintenance of limited government, e.g., the right to adequate notice of a hearing that may affect one's interests, the right to counsel in legislative hearings
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

III.F. How does the government established by the constitution embody the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy? How does the American political system provide for choice and opportunities for participation?

III.F.3. Political parties, campaigns, and elections. Students should be able to explain how political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.F.3.1. Describe the role of political parties
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.F.3.3. Explain ways individuals can participate in political parties, campaigns, and elections
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
III.F.4. Associations and groups. Students should be able to explain how interest groups, unions, and professional organizations provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.F.4.1. Describe the historical roles of prominent associations and groups in local, state, or national politics, e.g., abolitionists, suffragists, labor unions, agricultural organizations, civil rights groups, religious organizations
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.F.5. Forming and carrying out public policy. Students should be able to explain how public policy is formed and carried out at local, state, and national levels and what roles individuals can play in the process. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
III.F.5.1. Define public policy and identify examples at local, state, and national levels
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
III.F.5.2. Describe how public policies are formed and implemented
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3

IV.A. What is the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs? How is the world organized politically?

IV.A.2. Interaction among nation-states. Students should be able to explain how nation-states interact with each other. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
IV.A.2.1. Describe the most important means nation-states use to interact with one another
IV.A.2.1.a. Trade
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
IV.A.2.1.b. Diplomacy
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
IV.A.2.1.c. Treaties and agreements
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
IV.A.2.1.e. Economic incentives and sanctions
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
IV.A.2.1.f. Military force and the threat of force
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
IV.A.2.2. Explain reasons for the breakdown of order among nation-states, e.g., conflicts about national interests, ethnicity, and religion; competition for resources and territory; absence of effective means to enforce international law
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
IV.A.2.3. Explain the consequences of the breakdown of order among nation-states
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
IV.A.3. United States' relations with other nation-states. Students should be able to explain how United States foreign policy is made and the means by which it is carried out. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
IV.A.3.2. Describe various means used to attain the ends of United States foreign policy, e.g., diplomacy; economic, military, and humanitarian aid; treaties; trade agreements; incentives; sanctions; military intervention; covert action
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
IV.A.4. International organizations. Students should be able to explain the role of major international organizations in the world today. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
IV.A.4.1. Describe the purposes and functions of major governmental international organizations, e.g., UN, NATO, OAS, World Court
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

IV.B. What is the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs? How has the United States influenced other nations and how have other nations influenced American politics and society?

IV.B.1. Impact of the American concept of democracy and individual rights on the world. Students should be able to describe the influence of American political ideas on other nations. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
IV.B.1.1. Describe the impact on other nations of the American Revolution and of the values and principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
IV.B.1.2. Describe the influence American ideas about rights have had on other nations and international organizations, e.g., French Revolution; democracy movements in Eastern Europe, People's Republic of China, Latin America, South Africa; United Nations Charter; Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

V.A. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? What is citizenship?

V.A.1. The meaning of citizenship. Students should be able to explain the meaning of American citizenship. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.A.1.1. Explain the important characteristics of citizenship in the United States. Specifically, citizenship
V.A.1.1.a. Is legally recognized membership in a self-governing community
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.1.1.b. Confers full membership in a self-governing community--there are no degrees of citizenship or of legally tolerated states of inferior citizenship in the United States
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.1.1.c. Confers equal rights under the law
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.1.1.d. Is not dependent on inherited, involuntary groupings such as race, gender, or ethnicity
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.1.1.e. Confers certain rights and privileges, e.g., the right to vote, to hold public office, to serve on juries
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.1.2. Explain that Americans are citizens of both their state and the United States
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.2. Becoming a citizen. Students should be able to explain how one becomes a citizen of the United States. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.A.2.1. Explain that anyone born in the United States is a U.S. citizen
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.A.2.2. Explain the distinction between citizens and noncitizens (aliens)
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.B. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? What are the rights of citizens?

V.B.1. Personal rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues involving personal rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.1.1. Identify personal rights, e.g., freedom of conscience, freedom to marry whom one chooses, to have children, to associate with whomever one pleases, to live where one chooses, to travel freely, to emigrate
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.1.2. Identify the major documentary sources of personal rights, e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, state constitutions
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.1.3. Explain the importance to the individual and to society of such personal rights as
V.B.1.3.a. Freedom of conscience and religion
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.1.3.b. Freedom of expression and association
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.1.3.c. Freedom of movement and residence
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.1.3.d. Privacy
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.1.4. Identify and evaluate contemporary issues that involve personal rights, e.g., restricting membership in private organizations, school prayer, dress codes, curfews, sexual harassment, the right to refuse medical care
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.2. Political rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues involving political rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.2.1. Identify political rights, e.g., the right to vote, petition, assembly, freedom of press
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.2.2. Explain the meaning of political rights as distinguished from personal rights, e.g., the right of free speech for political discussion as distinct from the right of free speech to express personal tastes and interests, the right to register to vote as distinct from the right to live where one chooses
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.2.3. Identify major statements of political rights in documents such as the Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, state constitutions, and civil rights legislation
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.2.4. Explain the importance to the individual and society of such political rights as
V.B.2.4.a. Freedom of speech, press, assembly, and petition
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.2.4.b. Right to vote and to seek public office
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.2.5. Identify and evaluate contemporary issues that involve political rights, e.g., hate speech, fair trial, free press
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.3. Economic rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues involving economic rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.3.2. Identify statements of economic rights in the United States Constitution, e.g., requirement of just compensation, contracts, copyright, patents
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.3.3. Explain the importance to the individual and to society of such economic rights as the right to
V.B.3.3.b. Choose one's work, change employment
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.3.3.e. Copyright and patent
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.3.3.f. Enter into lawful contracts
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.3.4. Identify and evaluate contemporary issues regarding economic rights, e.g., employment, welfare, social security, minimum wage, health care, equal pay for equal work, freedom of contract
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4. Scope and limits of rights. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues regarding the proper scope and limits of rights. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.B.4.1. Explain what is meant by the ''scope and limits'' of a right, e.g., the scope of one's right to free speech in the United States is extensive and protects almost all forms of political expression. The right to free speech, however, can be limited if and when that speech seriously harms or endangers others
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.4.2. Explain the argument that all rights have limits
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3. Explain criteria commonly used in determining what limits should be placed on specific rights, e.g.,
V.B.4.3.a. Clear and present danger rule
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3.b. Compelling government interest test
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3.c. National security
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3.d. Libel or slander
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3.e. Public safety
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.3.f. Equal opportunity
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.B.4.4. Identify and evaluate positions on a contemporary conflict between rights, e.g., right to a fair trial and right to a free press, right to privacy and right to freedom of expression
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
V.B.4.5. Identify and evaluate positions on a contemporary conflict between rights and other social values and interests, e.g., the right of the public to know what their government is doing versus the need for national security, the right to property versus the protection of the environment
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.C. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? What are the responsibilities of citizens?

V.C.1. Personal responsibilities. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on the importance of personal responsibilities to the individual and to society. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.C.1.1. Evaluate the importance of commonly held personal responsibilities, such as
V.C.1.1.a. Taking care of one's self
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.1.1.b. Supporting one's family
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.1.1.d. Adhering to moral principles
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.1.2. Identify and evaluate contemporary issues that involve personal responsibilities, e.g., failure to provide adequate support or care for one's children, cheating on examinations, lack of concern for the less fortunate
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2. Civic responsibilities. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on the importance of civic responsibilities to the individual and society. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.C.2.1. Evaluate the importance of commonly held civic responsibilities, such as
V.C.2.1.a. Obeying the law
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2.1.c. Respecting the rights of others
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2.1.f. Deciding whether and how to vote
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2.1.i. Serving as a juror
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2.4. Evaluate the importance for the individual and society of fulfilling civic responsibilities
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.C.2.5. Identify and evaluate contemporary issues that involve civic responsibilities, e.g., low voter participation, avoidance of jury duty, failure to be informed about public issues
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.D. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? What dispositions or traits of character are important to the preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy?

V.D.1. Dispositions that enhance citizen effectiveness and promote the healthy functioning of American constitutional democracy. Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on the importance of certain dispositions or traits of character to themselves and American constitutional democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.D.1.1. Explain the importance to the individual and society of the following dispositions or traits of character
V.D.1.1.a. Individual responsibility--fulfilling the moral and legal obligations of membership in society
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

V.E. What are the roles of the citizen in American democracy? How can citizens take part in civic life?

V.E.3. Forms of political participation. Students should be able to describe the means by which Americans can monitor and influence politics and government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.E.3.1. Explain how Americans can use the following means to monitor and influence politics and government at local, state, and national levels
V.E.3.1.a. Voting
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.E.3.1.e. Joining political parties, interest groups, and other organizations that attempt to influence public policy and elections
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
V.E.3.2. Describe historical and current examples of citizen movements seeking to promote individual rights and the common good, e.g., abolition, suffrage, labor and civil rights movements
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
V.E.4. Political leadership and public service. Students should be able to explain the importance of political leadership and public service in a constitutional democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.E.4.4. Identify opportunities for political leadership in their own school, community, state, and the nation
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
V.E.4.6. Evaluate the role of ''the loyal opposition'' in a constitutional democracy
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
V.E.5. Knowledge and participation. Students should be able to explain the importance of knowledge to competent and responsible participation in American democracy. To achieve this standard, students should be able to
V.E.5.3. Evaluate the claim that constitutional democracy requires the participation of an attentive, knowledgeable, and competent citizenry
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

N.NCSE. National Content Standards in Economics (NCSE)

NCSE.1. Scarcity

Students will understand that productive resources are limited. Therefore, people cannot have all the goods and services they want; as a result, they must choose some things and give up others. Students will be able to use this knowledge to identify what they gain and what they give up when they make choices.
1.1. At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
1.1.1. Scarcity is the condition of not being able to have all of the goods and services that one wants. It exists because human wants for goods and services exceed the quantity of goods and services that can be produced using all available resources. Scarcity is experienced by individuals, governments, and societies.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

NCSE.3. Allocation

Students will understand that different methods can be used to allocate goods and services. People acting individually or collectively must choose which methods to use to allocate different kinds of goods and services. Students will be able to use this knowledge to evaluate different methods of allocating goods and services, by comparing the benefits to the costs of each method.
3.1. At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
3.1.1. Scarcity requires the use of some distribution method to allocate goods, services, and resources, whether the method is selected explicitly or not.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
3.1.2. There are essential differences between a market economy, in which allocations result from individuals making decisions as buyers and sellers, and a command economy, in which resources are allocated according to central authority.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.4. National economies vary in the extent to which they rely on government directives (central planning) and signals (prices) from private markets to allocate scarce goods, services, and productive resources.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.1.5. As consumers, people use resources in different ways to satisfy different wants. Productive resources can be used in different ways to produce different goods and services.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
3.2.5. List the resources used to produce some item and identify other items that could have been made from these resources. Repeat the exercise for household production.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3

NCSE.5. Trade

Students will understand that voluntary exchange occurs only when all participating parties expect to gain. This is true for trade among individuals or organizations within a nation, and among individuals or organizations in different nations. Students will be able to use this knowledge to negotiate exchanges and identify the gains to themselves and others. Compare the benefits and costs of policies that alter trade barriers between nations, such as tariffs and quotas.
5.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
5.1.2. Free trade increases worldwide material standards of living.
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.1.3. The gains from free trade are not distributed equally, and some individuals or groups may lose more than they gain when trade barriers are reduced.
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.1.4. Despite the mutual benefits from trade among people in different countries, many nations employ trade barriers to restrict free trade for national defense reasons, to protect key industries, or because some companies and workers are hurt by free trade.
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.1.5. Imports are foreign goods and services that are purchased from sellers in other nations.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.6. Exports are domestic goods and services that are sold to buyers in other nations.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
5.2.4. Look at historical examples of periods when the United States has imposed trade barriers and explain why the U.S. government would impose trade barriers given the mutual benefits of free trade.
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.2.6. Determine what major products are produced in their community or state for export and the countries to which they are exported.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

NCSE.6. Specialization

Students will understand that when individuals, regions, and nations specialize in what they can produce at the lowest cost and then trade with others, both production and consumption increase. Students will be able to use this knowledge to explain how they can benefit themselves and others by developing special skills and strengths.
6.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
6.1.3. As a result of growing international economic interdependence, economic conditions and policies in one nation increasingly affect economic conditions and policies in other nations.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3

NCSE.7. Markets and Prices

Students will understand that a market exists when buyers and sellers interact. This interaction determines market prices and thereby allocates scarce goods and services. Students will be able to use this knowledge to identify markets in which they have participated as a buyer and as a seller and describe how the interaction of all buyers and sellers influences prices. Also, predict how prices change when there is either a shortage or surplus of the product available.
7.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
7.2.2. Explain what will happen to the relative price of a good if it becomes increasingly scarce.
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
7.2.4. Identify examples of products for which the price fell because sellers did not sell all they had produced at the initial price; identify examples of other products for which the price rose because consumers wanted to buy more than producers were producing at the initial price.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSE.8. Role of Prices

Students will understand that prices send signals and provide incentives to buyers and sellers. When supply or demand changes, market prices adjust, affecting incentives. Students will be able to use this knowledge to predict how changes in factors such as consumers’ tastes or producers’ technology affect prices.
8.1. At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
8.1.1. An increase in the price of a good or service encourages people to look for substitutes, causing the quantity demanded to decrease, and vice versa. This well- established relationship between price and quantity demanded, known as the law of demand, exists as long as other factors influencing demand do not change.
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
8.1.2. An increase in the price of a good or service encourages producers to supply more, and vice versa. This relationship between price and quantity supplied is normally true as long as other factors influencing costs of production and supply do not change.
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSE.10. Institutions

Students will understand that institutions evolve and are created to help individuals and groups accomplish their goals. Banks, labor unions, markets, corporations, legal systems, and not-for-profit organizations are examples of important institutions. A different kind of institution, clearly defined and enforced property rights, is essential to a market economy. Students will be able to use this knowledge to describe the roles of various economic institutions and explain the importance of property rights in a market economy.
10.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
10.2.3. Read about the establishment of a labor union and explain why it emerged, how it influenced the U.S. economy, and what procedures it used to gain benefits for its members and workers in general.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCSE.16. Role of Government and Market Failure

Students will understand that there is an economic role for government in a market economy whenever the benefits of a government policy outweigh its costs. Governments often provide for national defense, address environmental concerns, define and protect property rights, and attempt to make markets more competitive. Most government policies also have direct or indirect effects on people’s incomes. Students will be able to use this knowledge to identify and evaluate the benefits and costs of alternative public policies, and assess who enjoys the benefits and who bears the costs.
16.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmarks for this standard, and also that:
16.1.3. Most federal government tax revenue comes from personal income and payroll taxes. Payments to Social Security recipients, the costs of national defense and homeland security, medical expenditures (such as Medicare), transfers to state and local governments, and interest payments on the national debt constitute the bulk of federal government spending.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
16.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
16.2.4. Compare the various sources of state and local revenues and various categories of state and local expenditures in their state and community with those of the U.S. federal government.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3

NCSE.18. Economic Fluctuations

Students will understand that fluctuations in a nation’s overall levels of income, employment, and prices are determined by the interaction of spending and production decisions made by all households, firms, government agencies, and others in the economy. Recessions occur when overall levels of income and employment decline. Students will be able to use this knowledge to interpret media reports about current economic conditions and explain how these conditions can influence decisions made by consumers, producers, and government policy makers.
18.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know that:
18.1.3. Net exports equal the value of exports (goods and services sold to other countries) minus the value of imports (goods and services bought from other countries). Net exports can be either positive (trade surplus) or negative (trade deficit).
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
18.2 At the completion of Grade 8, students will use this knowledge to:
18.2.3. Calculate what has happened to net U.S. exports because of changes in exports and imports over the last 10 years. Identify whether there has been a trade surplus or trade deficit over these years.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

NCSE.19. Unemployment and Inflation

Students will understand that unemployment imposes costs on individuals and the overall economy. Inflation, both expected and unexpected, also imposes costs on individuals and the overall economy. Unemployment increases during recessions and decreases during recoveries. Students will be able to use this knowledge to make informed decisions by anticipating the consequences of inflation and unemployment.
19.1. At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmark for this standard, and also that:
19.1.1. To be counted as unemployed, a person must be in the labor force. The labor force consists of people age 16 and over who are employed or actively seeking work. Thus the labor force is the sum of total employment and total unemployment.
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
19.1 At the completion of Grade 8, students will know the Grade 4 benchmark for this standard, and also that:
19.1.3. The unemployment rate is the percentage of the labor force that is willing and able to work, does not currently have a job, and is actively looking for work.
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

N.NCHS. National Center for History in Schools (NCHS)

NCHS.HT. Historical Thinking Standards

HT.1. Chronological Thinking
HT.1.A. Distinguish between past, present, and future time.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
HT.1.B. Identify the temporal structure of a historical narrative or story.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.1.E. Interpret data presented in time lines and create time lines.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
HT.1.F. Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration; explain historical continuity and change.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.1.G. Compare alternative models for periodization.
Review Grades 1-4
Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments
Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions
Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence
What is Government and what should it do? Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
HT.2. Historical Comprehension
HT.2.B. Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inventors
An inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
HT.2.C. Identify the central question(s) the historical narrative addresses.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.3. Historical Analysis and Interpretation
HT.3.A. Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas.
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
HT.3.C. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation, including the importance of the individual, the influence of ideas.
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Holocaust
The Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.3.D. Draw comparisons across eras and regions in order to define enduring issues.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.3.G. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.3.H. Hold interpretations of history as tentative.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.4. Historical Research Capabilities
HT.4.A. Formulate historical questions.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.4.B. Obtain historical data from a variety of sources.
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
HT.4.E. Employ quantitative analysis.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
HT.5. Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making
HT.5.A. Identify issues and problems in the past.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HT.5.C. Identify relevant historical antecedents.
Archaeology
Many people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
About 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
FreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Egypt
FreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NCHS.USH. United States History Content Standards

USH.1. Era 1: Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)
USH.1.1. Comparative characteristics of societies in the Americas, Western Europe, and Western Africa that increasingly interacted after 1450.
USH.1.1A. The student understands the patterns of change in indigenous societies in the Americas up to the Columbian voyages.
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.1.1B. The student understands changes in Western European societies in the age of exploration.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.1.1D. The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.1.2. How early European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural and ecological interactions among previously unconnected peoples.
USH.1.2A. The student understands the stages of European oceanic and overland exploration, amid international rivalries, from the 9th to 17th centuries.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade Routes
Trade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.1.2B. The student understands the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of the Americas.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.2. Era 2: Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
USH.2.1. Why the Americas attracted Europeans, why they brought enslaved Africans to their colonies, and how Europeans struggled for control of North America and the Caribbean.
USH.2.1A. The student understands how diverse immigrants affected the formation of European colonies.
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.2.1B. The student understands the European struggle for control of North America.
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.2.2. How political, religious, and social institutions emerged in the English colonies.
USH.2.2A. The student understands the roots of representative government and how political rights were defined.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
USH.2.2B. The student understands religious diversity in the colonies and how ideas about religious freedom evolved.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.2.2C. The student understands social and cultural change in British America.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.2.3. How the values and institutions of European economic life took root in the colonies, and how slavery reshaped European and African life in the Americas.
USH.2.3A. The student understands colonial economic life and labor systems in the Americas.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
USH.2.3B. The student understands economic life and the development of labor systems in the English colonies.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
USH.2.3C. The student understands African life under slavery.
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
USH.3. Era 3: Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820s)
USH.3.1. The causes of the American Revolution, the ideas and interests involved in forging the revolutionary movement, and the reasons for the American victory.
USH.3.1A. The student understands the causes of the American Revolution.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.3.1B. The student understands the principles articulated in the Declaration of Independence.
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.3.1C. The student understands the factors affecting the course of the war and contributing to the American victory.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.3.2. The impact of the American Revolution on politics, economy, and society.
USH.3.2A. The student understands revolutionary government-making at national and state levels.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.3.2B. The student understands the economic issues arising out of the Revolution.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.3.3. The institutions and practices of government created during the Revolution and how they were revised between 1787 and 1815 to create the foundation of the American political system based on the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
USH.3.3A. The student understands the issues involved in the creation and ratification of the United States Constitution and the new government it established.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
USH.3.3B. The student understands the guarantees of the Bill of Rights and its continuing significance.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.4. Era 4: Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
USH.4.1. United States territorial expansion between 1801 and 1861, and how it affected relations with external powers and Native Americans.
USH.4.1A. The student understands the international background and consequences of the Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, and the Monroe Doctrine.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.1B. The student understands federal and state Indian policy and the strategies for survival forged by Native Americans.
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.1C. The student understands the ideology of Manifest Destiny, the nation's expansion to the Northwest, and the Mexican-American War.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.2. How the industrial revolution, increasing immigration, the rapid expansion of slavery, and the westward movement changed the lives of Americans and led toward regional tensions.
USH.4.2A. The student understands how the factory system and the transportation and market revolutions shaped regional patterns of economic development.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.2B. The student understands the first era of American urbanization.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.2C. The student understands how antebellum immigration changed American society.
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.2D. The student understands the rapid growth of "the peculiar institution" after 1800 and the varied experiences of African Americans under slavery.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.2E. The student understands the settlement of the West.
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.3. The extension, restriction, and reorganization of political democracy after 1800.
USH.4.3A. The student understands the changing character of American political life in "the age of the common man."
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.3B. The student understands how the debates over slavery influenced politics and sectionalism.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.4. The sources and character of cultural, religious, and social reform movements in the antebellum period.
USH.4.4A. The student understands the abolitionist movement.
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.4B. The student understands how Americans strived to reform society and create a distinct culture.
Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.4.4C. The student understands changing gender roles and the ideas and activities of women reformers.
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.5. Era 5: Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
USH.5.1. The causes of the Civil War.
USH.5.1A. The student understands how the North and South differed and how politics and ideologies led to the Civil War.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.5.2. The course and character of the Civil War and its effects on the American people.
USH.5.2A. The student understands how the resources of the Union and Confederacy affected the course of the war.
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.5.2B. The student understands the social experience of the war on the battlefield and homefront.
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.5.3. How various reconstruction plans succeeded or failed.
USH.5.3B. The student understands the Reconstruction programs to transform social relations in the South.
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.5.3C. The student understands the successes and failures of Reconstruction in the South, North, and West.
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6. Era 6: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900)
USH.6.1. How the rise of corporations, heavy industry, and mechanized farming transformed the American people.
USH.6.1A. The student understands the connections among industrialization, the advent of the modern corporation, and material well-being.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.6.1B. The student understands the rapid growth of cities and how urban life changed.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.1C. The student understands how agriculture, mining, and ranching were transformed.
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.2. Massive immigration after 1870 and how new social patterns, conflicts, and ideas of national unity developed amid growing cultural diversity.
USH.6.2A. The student understands the sources and experiences of the new immigrants.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.2B. The student understands "scientific racism", race relations, and the struggle for equal rights.
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.2C. The student understands how new cultural movements at different social levels affected American life.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class Systems
Throughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.6.3. The rise of the American labor movement and how political issues reflected social and economic changes.
USH.6.3A. The student understands how the "second industrial revolution" changed the nature and conditions of work.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.6.3B. The student understands the rise of national labor unions and the role of state and federal governments in labor conflicts.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.3C. The student understands how Americans grappled with social, economic, and political issues.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Urbanization
What is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great Migration
What was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.6.4. Federal Indian policy and United States foreign policy after the Civil War.
USH.6.4B. The student understands the roots and development of American expansionism and the causes and outcomes of the Spanish-American War.
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.7. Era 7: The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
USH.7.1. How Progressives and others addressed problems of industrial capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
USH.7.1A. The student understands the origin of the Progressives and the coalitions they formed to deal with issues at the local and state levels.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.7.1B. The student understands Progressivism at the national level.
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.7.1C. The student understands the limitations of Progressivism and the alternatives offered by various groups.
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.7.2. The changing role of the United States in world affairs through World War I.
USH.7.2A. The student understands how the American role in the world changed in the early 20th century.
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.7.2B. The student understands the causes of World War I and why the United States intervened.
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Movement
What is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.7.3. How the United States changed from the end of World War I to the eve of the Great Depression.
USH.7.3C. The student understands how new cultural movements reflected and changed American society.
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.7.3D. The student understands politics and international affairs in the 1920s.
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
In the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
n the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
USH.8. Era 8: The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
USH.8.1. The causes of the Great Depression and how it affected American society.
USH.8.1A. The student understands the causes of the crash of 1929 and the Great Depression.
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.8.1B. The student understands how American life changed during the 1930s.
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVA
After the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
USH.8.2. How the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed American federalism, and initiated the welfare state.
USH.8.2A. The student understands the New Deal and the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression.