Connecticut Core Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Central America
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Egypt
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Environmental Changes
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Mexico
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Phoenicia
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
South America
Worksheets: 3
The Vietnam War
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War I
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

CT.SS.8. UNITED STATES HISTORY

8.1. DIMENSION 1: DEVELOPING QUESTIONS AND PLANNING INQUIRY - Central to a rich social studies experience is the capability for developing questions that can frame and advance inquiry. Those questions come in two forms: compelling and supporting questions (C3, p. 23-25). It is expected that students in eighth-grade U.S. History will individually and with others:

INQ 6-8.1. Explain how a question represents key ideas in the field.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.2. Explain points of agreement experts have about interpretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a compelling question.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.3. Explain points of agreement experts have about interpretations and application of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a supporting question.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.4. Explain how the relationship between supporting questions and compelling questions is mutually reinforcing.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.5. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of views represented in the sources.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.2. DIMENSION 2: APPLYING DISCIPLINARY CONCEPTS AND TOOLS - Adapted In Grade 8, the focus is on the disciplinary concepts and skills students need to understand and apply as they study U.S. History. These disciplinary ideas are the lenses students use in their inquiries, and the consistent and coherent application of these lenses in Grade 8 should lead to deep and enduring understanding. (C3, p. 29) The focus of the eighth-grade course is on the discipline of history. History is supported through an interdisciplinary approach that includes civics, economics, and geography.

HISTORY
Change, Continuity and Context
HIST 8.1. Analyze connections among events and developments in historical contexts.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.2. Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Perspectives
HIST 8.3. Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.4. Explain how and why perspectives of people have changed over time (e.g., American Revolution, slavery, labor, the role of women).
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.5. Analyze how people's perspectives influenced what information is available in the historical sources they created.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Historical Sources and Evidence
HIST 8.6. Detect possible limitations in the historical record based on evidence collected from different kinds of historical sources.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.7. Use questions generated about multiple historical sources to identify further areas of inquiry and additional sources.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.8. Evaluate the relevance and utility of a historical source based on information such as maker, date, place of origin, intended audience, and purpose.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causation and Argumentation
HIST 8.9. Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
HIST 8.10. Organize applicable evidence into a coherent argument about the past.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
CIVICS
Civic and Political Institutions
CIV 8.1. Explain the origins, functions, and structure of government with reference to the U.S. Constitution, state constitutions, and selected other systems of government.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Participation and Deliberation
CIV 8.2. Analyze ideas and principles contained in the founding documents of the United States, and explain how they influence the social and political system.
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Processes, Rules, and Laws
CIV 8.3. Analyze the purposes, implementation, and consequences of public policies in multiple settings.
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
CIV 8.4. Compare historical and contemporary means of changing societies, and promoting the common good.
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
ECONOMICS
Exchange and Markets
ECO 8.3. Analyze the role of innovation and entrepreneurship in a market economy.
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
GEOGRAPHY
Human Population: Spatial Patterns and Movement
GEO 8.3. Explain how changes in transportation and communication technology influence the spatial connections among human settlements and affect the diffusion of ideas and cultural practices.
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Global Interconnections
GEO 8.4. Explain how the relationship between the environmental characteristics of places and production of goods influences the spatial patterns of world trade.
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.3. DIMENSION 3: EVALUATING SOURCES AND USING EVIDENCE - Students need to analyze information and come to conclusions in an inquiry. These skills focus on gathering and evaluating sources, and then developing claims and using evidence to support these claims (C3, p. 53-55). It is expected that students in eighth-grade U.S. History will individually and with others:

INQ 6-8.6. Gather relevant information from multiple sources while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.7. Evaluate the credibility of a source by determining its relevance and intended use.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.8. Identify evidence that draws information from multiple sources to support claims, noting evidentiary limitations.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.9. Develop claims and counterclaims while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.4. DIMENSION 4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS AND TAKING INFORMED ACTION - Students should construct and communicate claims for a variety of purposes and audiences. These audiences may range from the school classroom to the larger public community (C3, p. 59-62). It is expected that students in eighth-grade U.S. History will individually and with others:

INQ 6-8.10. Construct arguments using claims and evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging the strengths and limitations of the arguments.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.11. Construct explanations using reasoning, correct sequences, examples, and details with relevant information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanations.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.12. Present adaptations of arguments and explanations on topics of interest to others to reach audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technologies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.13. Critique arguments for credibility.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
INQ 6-8.14. Critique the structure of explanations.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

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