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New Hampshire Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

NH.3. Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

3.2. Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

3.2.8.1. Define the organization and responsibilities of federal government that are set forth in the New Hampshire Constitution, the United States Constitution and their amendments, e.g., Separation of Powers, Division of Powers, or the Bill of Rights.
3.2.8.2. Compare and contrast the structure and major responsibilities and services of government at the local, state, and federal levels as set forth in the New Hampshire Constitution and the United States Constitution, e.g., taxation, transportation, or education.
3.2.8.3. Describe ways in which particular events and documents contributed to the evolution of American government, e.g., states' rights, universal suffrage, or civil rights.
3.2.8.4. Explain the legislative and political processes by which a bill becomes a law or government policy is established at the local, state, and federal levels, e.g., citizen petitions or conference committees.

3.3. The World and the United States' Place In It: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the United States to other countries, and the role of the United States in world affairs.

3.3.8.1. Illustrate the importance of countries working together to resolve problems, e.g., the United Nations, NATO, or the European Union.
3.3.8.2. Analyze environmental, economic, and technological developments and their impact on society.

NH.4. Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

4.2. Basic Economic Concepts: Students will learn about the pillars of a free market economy and the market mechanism.

4.2.8.1. Identify and explain the determinants of supply and demand, e.g., income, tastes, or technology.
4.2.8.2. Explain the elements of entrepreneurship, e.g., idea development, risk-taking, or management skills.

4.3. Cycles in the Economy: Students will be able to explain the business cycle and trends in economic activity over time.

4.3.8.2. Understand how the stock market works, the buying and selling of stocks, and how it affects the economy.

4.5. International Economics and Trade: Students will recognize the importance of international trade and how economies are affected by it.

4.5.8.1. Distinguish among the different methods of allocating resources, e.g., traditional, free market, or command economies.
4.5.8.4. Examine the effects of changing economies on international trade, e.g., modernization, specialization, or interdependence.

4.6. Personal Finance: Students will be able to explain the importance of money management, spending credit, saving, and investing in a free market economy.

4.6.8.1. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of different payment methods.
4.6.8.3. Demonstrate the use of the different types of accounts available from financial institutions, e.g., checking or savings accounts.
4.6.8.4. Students will identify sources of earned and unearned income, e.g., wages or investments.
4.6.8.5. Define and compare saving and investing.
4.6.8.6. Evaluate sources of investment information, and describe how to buy and sell investments.
4.6.8.7. Discuss the importance of taking responsibility for personal financial decisions.
4.6.8.8. Design a plan for earning, spending, saving, and investing.

NH.5. Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

5.1. The World in Spatial Terms: Students will demonstrate the ability to use maps, mental maps, globes, and other graphic tools and technologies to acquire, process, report, and analyze geographic information.

5.1.8.1. Compare relative advantages and disadvantages of using maps, globes, aerial and other photographs, satellite-produced images, and models to solve geographic problems, e.g., the Mercator projections versus Robinson projections.

5.4. Human Systems: Students will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

5.4.8.1. Describe ways in which physical and human regional systems are interconnected, e.g., canal systems or 'hub-and-spoke' airline operations.
5.4.8.2. Explain how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political divisions of Earth's surface, e.g., trade agreements, military pacts, or boundary disputes.

NH.6. New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

6.1. Political Foundations and Development: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major ideas, issues and events pertaining to the history of governance in our state and nation.

6.1.8.1. Examine how suffrage expanded to various groups of citizens, e.g., women African-Americans.
6.1.8.3. Examine how religion has influenced the political life of the nation, e.g., the Know Nothing Party, the temperance movement, or the First Great Awakening.

6.2. Contacts, Exchanges & International Relations: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the events, actions and policies of our nation in relation to other peoples and governments over time.

6.2.8.1. Explain major attempts to force European powers to recognize and respect the sovereignty of the United States as a new nation, e.g., the Jay Treaty or the War of 1812.
6.2.8.2. Explain major United States efforts to remove European influence from the Western Hemisphere, e.g., the Monroe Doctrine or the Cuban Missile Crisis.
6.2.8.3. Compare and contrast the rationales for entering into war with other nations, e.g., the American Revolution or the Korean Conflict.
6.2.8.4. Analyze the extent to which democratic ideals, economic motives and empire building have influenced United States foreign policy in events and policies, e.g., the Louisiana Purchase or the Marshall Plan.
6.2.8.5. Investigate the impact of foreign policy on domestic affairs as illustrated in historical events, e.g., the XYZ Affair or the Vietnam War.

6.4. Economic Systems & Technology: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the changing forms of production, distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

6.4.8.2. Examine the causes of conflict between management and labor, e.g., the Pullman Strike or the Air Traffic Controllers Strike of 1981.

NH.7. World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

7.1. Political Foundations and Developments: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major events, ideas and issues pertaining to the history of governance.

7.1.8.2. Analyze the influence of religious groups on political systems, e.g., Confucianism in China, Catholicism in Europe, or Wahabism in the Middle East.
7.1.8.3. Explore the use and abuse of power that results in mass murder and genocide, e.g., Carthage by Rome, the conquest of Aztecs, or the Holocaust.

7.3. World Views and Value systems and their Intellectual and Artistic Expressions: Students will demonstrate their understanding of conceptions of reality, ideals, guidelines of behavior and their forms of expression.

7.3.8.2. Analyze how architecture has symbolized the values of various societies, e.g., Greco-Roman, Tudor English, or Scandinavian.

NH.CC.RH.6-8. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Craft and Structure

RH.6-8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The AztecsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The MayaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The IncasWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MesopotamiaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1EgyptWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient Israel Worksheets :3Study Guides :1PhoeniciaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient GreeceWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient RomeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient ChinaFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MexicoWorksheets :4Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3EconomicsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
RH.6-8.5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
Geographic Map TermsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Geographic ToolsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The AztecsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The MayaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The IncasWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MesopotamiaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1EgyptWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient Israel Worksheets :3Study Guides :1PhoeniciaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient GreeceWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient RomeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient ChinaFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MexicoWorksheets :4Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3EconomicsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Environmental ChangesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

RH.6-8.10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Geographic Map TermsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Geographic ToolsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The AztecsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The MayaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The IncasWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MesopotamiaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1EgyptWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient Israel Worksheets :3Study Guides :1PhoeniciaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient GreeceWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient RomeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient ChinaFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MexicoWorksheets :4Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3EconomicsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Environmental ChangesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

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