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Living and Nonliving First Grade Social Studies

New York Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

NY.1. History of the United States and New York: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.

1.1. The study of New York State and United States history requires an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context, and the ways people are unified by many values, practices, and traditions.

1.1.2. Students interpret the ideas, values, and beliefs contained in the Declaration of Independence and the New York State Constitution and United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other important historical documents.

1.2. Important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions from New York State and United States history illustrate the connections and interactions of people and events across time and from a variety of perspectives.

1.2.1. Students describe the reasons for periodizing history in different ways.
1.2.2. Students investigate key turning points in New York State and United States history and explain why these events or developments are significant.
1.2.3. Students understand the relationship between the relative importance of United States domestic and foreign policies over time.
1.2.4. Students analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present.

1.3. Study about the major social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in New York State and United States history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.

1.3.1. Students complete well-documented and historically accurate case studies about individuals and groups who represent different ethnic, national, and religious groups, including Native American Indians, in New York State and the United States at different times and in different locations.
1.3.2. Students gather and organize information about the important achievements and contributions of individuals and groups living in New York State and the United States.
1.3.3. Students describe how ordinary people and famous historic figures in the local community, State, and the United States have advanced the fundamental democratic values, beliefs, and traditions expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the New York State and United States Constitutions, the Bill of Rights, and other important historic documents.
1.3.4. Students classify major developments into categories such as social, political, economic, geographic, technological, scientific, cultural, or religious.

1.4. The skills of historical analysis include the ability to: explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the concept of multiple causation; understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.

1.4.1. Students consider the sources of historic documents, narratives, or artifacts and evaluate their reliability
1.4.2. Students understand how different experiences, beliefs, values, traditions, and motives cause individuals and groups to interpret historic events and issues from different perspectives.
1.4.3. Students compare and contrast different interpretations of key events and issues in New York State and United States history and explain reasons for these different accounts.
1.4.4. Students describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there. (Taken from National Standards for History for Grades K-4).

NY.2. World History: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.

2.1. The study of world history requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. This study also examines the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives.

2.1.1. Students know the social and economic characteristics, such as customs, traditions, child-rearing practices, ways of making a living, education and socialization practices, gender roles, foods, and religious and spiritual beliefs that distinguish different cultures and civilizations.
2.1.2. Students know some important historic events and developments of past civilizations.
2.1.3. Students interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history.

2.2. Establishing timeframes, exploring different periodizations, examining themes across time and within cultures, and focusing on important turning points in world history help organize the study of world cultures and civilizations.

2.2.3. Students study about major turning points in world history by investigating the causes and other factors that brought about change and the results of these changes.

2.3. Study of the major social, political, cultural, and religious developments in world history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.

2.3.1. Students investigate the roles and contributions of individuals and groups in relation to key social, political, cultural, and religious practices throughout world history.
2.3.2. Students interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history.
2.3.3. Students classify historic information according to the type of activity or practice: social/cultural, political, economic, geographic, scientific, technological, and historic.

2.4. The skills of historical analysis include the ability to investigate differing and competing interpretations of the theories of history, hypothesize about why interpretations change over time, explain the importance of historical evidence, and understand the concepts of change and continuity over time.

2.4.1. Students explain the literal meaning of a historical passage or primary source document, identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led up to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed (Taken from National Standards for World History).
2.4.2. Students analyze different interpretations of important events and themes in world history and explain the various frames of reference expressed by different historians.
2.4.4. Students investigate important events and developments in world history by posing analytical questions, selecting relevant data, distinguishing fact from opinion, hypothesizing cause-and-effect relationships, testing these hypotheses, and forming conclusions.

NY.3. Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface.

3.1. Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. (Adapted from The National Geography Standards, 1994: Geography for Life).

3.1.1. Students map information about people, places, and environments.
3.1.2. Students understand the characteristics, functions, and applications of maps, globes, aerial and other photographs, satellite-produced images, and models (Taken from National Geography Standards, 1994).
3.1.3. Students investigate why people and places are located where they are located and what patterns can be perceived in these locations.
3.1.4. Students describe the relationships between people and environments and the connections between people and places.

3.2. Geography requires the development and application of the skills of asking and answering geographic questions; analyzing theories of geography; and acquiring, organizing, and analyzing geographic information. (Adapted from The National Geography Standards, 1994: Geography for Life).

3.2.1. Students formulate geographic questions and define geographic issues and problems.
3.2.2. Students use a number of research skills (e.g., computer databases, periodicals, census reports, maps, standard reference works, interviews, surveys) to locate and gather geographical information about issues and problems (Adapted from National Geography Standards, 1994).
3.2.3. Students present geographic information in a variety of formats, including maps, tables, graphs, charts, diagrams, and computer-generated models.
3.2.4. Students interpret geographic information by synthesizing data and developing conclusions and generalizations about geographic issues and problems.

NY.4. Economics: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.

4.1. The study of economics requires an understanding of major economic concepts and systems, the principles of economic decision making, and the interdependence of economies and economic systems throughout the world.

4.1.1. Students explain how societies and nations attempt to satisfy their basic needs and wants by utilizing scarce capital, natural, and human resources.
4.1.2. Students define basic economic concepts such as scarcity, supply and demand, markets, opportunity costs, resources, productivity, economic growth, and systems.
4.1.3. Students understand how scarcity requires people and nations to make choices which involve costs and future considerations.
4.1.4. Students understand how people in the United States and throughout the world are both producers and consumers of goods and services.
4.1.6. Students describe how traditional, command, market, and mixed economies answer the three fundamental economic questions.
4.1.7. Students explain how nations throughout the world have joined with one another to promote economic development and growth.

4.2. Economics requires the development and application of the skills needed to make informed and well-reasoned economic decisions in daily and national life.

4.2.4. Students develop conclusions about economic issues and problems by creating broad statements which summarize findings and solutions.

NY.5. Civics, Citizenship, and Government: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the United States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.

5.1. The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. (Adapted from The National Standards for Civics and Government, 1994).

5.1.4. Students analyze the sources of a nation's values as embodied in its constitution, statutes, and important court cases.

5.2. The state and federal governments established by the Constitutions of the United States and the State of New York embody basic civic values (such as justice, honesty, self-discipline, due process, equality, majority rule with respect for minority rights, and respect for self, others, and property), principles, and practices and establish a system of shared and limited government. (Adapted from The National Standards for Civics and Government, 1994).

5.2.1. Students understand how civic values reflected in United States and New York State Constitutions have been implemented through laws and practices.
5.2.2. Students understand that the New York State Constitution, along with a number of other documents, served as a model for the development of the United States Constitution.
5.2.3. Students compare and contrast the development and evolution of the constitutions of the United States and New York State.
5.2.4. Students define federalism and describe the powers granted the national and state governments by the United States Constitution.
5.2.5. Students value the principles, ideals, and core values of the American democratic system based upon the premises of human dignity, liberty, justice, and equality.
5.2.6. Students understand how the United States and New York State Constitutions support majority rule but also protect the rights of the minority.

NY.CC.6-8.RH. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Craft and Structure

6-8.RH.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The AztecsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The MayaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The IncasWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MesopotamiaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1EgyptWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient Israel Worksheets :3Study Guides :1PhoeniciaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient GreeceWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient RomeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient ChinaFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MexicoWorksheets :4Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3EconomicsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.RH.5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
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Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

6-8.RH.10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Geographic Map TermsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Geographic ToolsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The AztecsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The MayaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The IncasWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MesopotamiaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1EgyptWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient Israel Worksheets :3Study Guides :1PhoeniciaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient GreeceWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient RomeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Ancient ChinaFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1MexicoWorksheets :4Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3EconomicsWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Environmental ChangesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

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