New York State Learning Standards and Core Curriculum for Eighth Grade Social Studies

The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War I
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War II
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

NY.RH.5-8. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Craft and Structure

RH.5-8.4. Determine the meanings of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
Worksheets :3
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
RH.5-8.5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
Worksheets :3
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

RH.5-8.10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 5-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
Worksheets :3
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

NY.8P. Grade 8: Social Studies Practices

8P.A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

8P.A.1. Define and frame questions about the United States and answer them by gathering, interpreting, and using evidence.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
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Progressive Era
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Expansionism
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The Roaring Twenties
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The Great Depression
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World War II
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The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
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8P.B. Chronological Reasoning

8P.B.4. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationship between multiple causes and effects.
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
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Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
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The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
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Environmental Changes
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8P.B.5. Distinguish between long-term and immediate causes and effects of an event from current events or history.
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
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Environmental Changes
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8P.B.6. Recognize, analyze, and evaluate dynamics of historical continuity and change over periods of time.
Women's Rights
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8P.B.8. Relate patterns of continuity and change to larger historical processes and themes.
Women's Rights
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8P.D. Geographic Reasoning

8P.D.1. Use location terms and geographic representations, such as maps, photographs, satellite images, and models to describe where places are in relation to each other and connections between places; evaluate the benefits of particular places for purposeful activities.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8P.D.2. Distinguish human activities and human-made features from “environments” (natural events or physical features—land, air, and water—that are not directly made by humans) and describe the relationship between human activities and the environment.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
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Environmental Changes
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8P.E. Economics and Economic Systems

8P.E.1. Explain how economic decisions affect the well-being of individuals, businesses, and society; evaluate alternative approaches or solutions to economic issues in terms of benefits and costs for different groups of people.
Economics
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8P.F. Civic Participation

8P.F.3. Identify and explain different types of political systems and ideologies used at various times in United States history and explain the roles of individuals and key groups in those political and social systems.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

NY.8. History of the United States and New York State II

8.1. RECONSTRUCTION: Regional tensions following the Civil War complicated efforts to heal the nation and to redefine the status of African Americans. (Standards: 1, 4, 5; Themes: MOV, SOC, CIV, ECO)

8.1a. Different approaches toward and policies for Reconstruction highlight the challenges faced in reunifying the nation.
8.1a.1. Students will compare and contrast the differences between Reconstruction under Lincoln’s plan, Johnson’s plan, and congressional (Radical) Reconstruction.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1b. Freed African Americans created new lives for themselves in the absence of slavery. Constitutional amendments and federal legislation sought to expand the rights and protect the citizenship of African Americans.
8.1b.1. Students will examine the Reconstruction amendments (13th, 14th, and 15th) in terms of the rights and protections provided to African Americans.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1b.2. Students will examine the Freedmen’s Bureau’s purpose, successes, and the extent of its success.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1b.5. Students will examine the rise of African Americans in government.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1c. Federal initiatives begun during Reconstruction were challenged on many levels, leading to negative impacts on the lives of African Americans.
8.1c.1. Students will explore methods used by Southern state governments to affect the lives of African Americans, including the passage of Black Codes, poll taxes, and Jim Crow laws.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1c.3. Students will examine the ways in which the federal government failed to follow up on its promises to freed African Americans.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.2. A CHANGING SOCIETY: Industrialization and immigration contributed to the urbanization of America. Problems resulting from these changes sparked the Progressive movement and increased calls for reform. (Standards: 1, 2, 4; Themes: MOV, SOC, TECH, EXCH)

8.2c. Increased urbanization and industrialization contributed to increasing conflicts over immigration, influenced changes in labor conditions, and led to political corruption.
8.2c.2. Students will explore the growth and effects of child labor and sweatshops.
The Nation Grows and Expands
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8.2c.3. Students will explore the development of political machines, including Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall.
The Jackson Age
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8.2d. In response to shifts in working conditions, laborers organized and employed a variety of strategies in an attempt to improve their conditions.
8.2d.1. Students will examine the goals and tactics of specific labor unions including the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, and the Industrial Workers of the World.
Industrial Growth
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8.2d.2. Students will examine key labor events including the Haymarket affair, the Pullman Strike and the International Ladies Garment Workers’ Union strike.
Industrial Growth
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8.2e. Progressive reformers sought to address political and social issues at the local, state, and federal levels of government between 1890 and 1920. These efforts brought renewed attention to women’s rights and the suffrage movement and spurred the creation of government reform policies.
8.2e.1. Students will examine the Populist Party as a reform effort by farmers in response to industrialization.
Industrial Growth
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8.2e.3. Students will explore leaders and activities of the temperance and woman’s suffrage movements.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
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8.2e.5. Students will examine state and federal government responses to reform efforts, including the passage of the 17th amendment, child labor and minimum wage laws, antitrust legislation, and food and drug regulations.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.3. EXPANSION AND IMPERIALISM: Beginning in the second half of the 19th century, economic, political, and cultural factors contributed to a push for westward expansion and more aggressive United States foreign policy. (Standards: 1, 2, 3, 5; Themes: GEO, GOV, CIV, ECO)

8.3a. Continued westward expansion contributed to increased conflicts with Native Americans.
8.3a.1. Students will examine the effects of the transcontinental railroad on the movement toward westward expansion.
Industrial Growth
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8.3b. The Spanish-American War contributed to the rise of the United States as an imperial power.
8.3b.1. Students will examine examples of yellow journalism that contributed to United States entry into the Spanish-American War, including the portrayal of the sinking of the USS Maine.
Expansionism
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8.3b.2. Students will explain how the events and outcomes of the Spanish-American War contributed to the shift to imperialism in United States foreign policy.
Expansionism
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8.3d. The Roosevelt Corollary expanded the Monroe Doctrine and increased United States involvement in the affairs of Latin America. This led to resentment of the United States among many in Latin America.
8.3d.1. Students will evaluate the United States actions taken under the Roosevelt Corollary and their effects on relationships between the United States and Latin American nations, including the building of the Panama Canal.
Expansionism
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8.4. WORLD WAR I AND THE ROARING TWENTIES: Various diplomatic, economic, and ideological factors contributed to the United States decision to enter World War I. Involvement in the war significantly altered the lives of Americans. Postwar America was characterized by economic prosperity, technological innovations, and changes in the workplace. (Standards: 1, 2, 4; Themes: SOC, GOV, ECO, TECH)

8.4a. European militarism, the alliance system, imperialism, and nationalism were all factors that contributed to the start of World War I.
World War I
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8.4b. International, economic, and military developments swayed opinion in favor of the United States siding with the Allies and entering World War I. Domestic responses to World War I limited civil liberties within the United States.
8.4b.1. Students will examine an overview of the causes of World War I, focusing on the factors leading to United States entry into the war.
World War I
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8.4b.2. Students will examine examples of war propaganda and its effects on support for United States involvement in the war.
World War I
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8.4b.3. Students will examine the restrictions placed on citizens after United States entry into the war, including the Espionage Act (1917) and the Sedition Act (1918).
World War I
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8.4d. Following extensive political debate, the United States refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles. The United States then sought to return to prewar policies by focusing on domestic rather than international matters.
8.4d.1. Students will examine Wilson’s Fourteen Points and investigate reasons why the United States Senate refused to support the Treaty of Versailles, focusing on opposition to the League of Nations.
World War II
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8.4e. After World War I, the United States entered a period of economic prosperity and cultural change. This period is known as the Roaring Twenties. During this time, new opportunities for women were gained, and African Americans engaged in various efforts to distinguish themselves and celebrate their culture.
8.4e.1. Students will investigate the efforts of women suffragists and explain the historical significance of the 19th amendment.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
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8.4e.2. Students will examine the reasons for and effects of prohibition on American society.
The Roaring Twenties
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8.5. GREAT DEPRESSION: Economic and environmental disasters in the 1930s created hardships for many Americans. Amidst much debate about the appropriate role of government, President Franklin D. Roosevelt helped to create intensive government interventions in the United States economy and society. (Standards: 1, 3, 5; Themes: TCC, SOC, GOV, ECO)

8.5a. Risky investing, protectionism, and overproduction led to the collapse of the stock market, a wave of bank failures, and a long and severe downturn in the economy called the Great Depression.
8.5a.1. Students will examine how the economic practices of the 1920s contributed to the coming of the Great Depression.
The Great Depression
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8.5b. The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl affected American businesses and families.
8.5b.1. Students will examine the effects of the Great Depression on American families in terms of the loss of jobs, wealth, and homes, noting varying effects based on class, race, and gender. Students will explore the conditions in New York City and other communities within New York State during the Great Depression.
The Great Depression
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8.5c. President Roosevelt issued the New Deal in an attempt to revive the economy and help Americans deal with the hardships of the Great Depression. These New Deal reforms had a long-lasting effect on the role of government in American society and its economic life, but did not resolve all of the hardships Americans faced.
8.5c.1. Students will identify key programs adopted under the New Deal, including the creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the adoption of the Social Security Act.
The Great Depression
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8.6. WORLD WAR II: The aggression of the Axis powers threatened United States security and led to its entry into World War II. The nature and consequences of warfare during World War II transformed the United States and the global community. The damage from total warfare and atrocities such as the Holocaust led to a call for international efforts to protect human rights and prevent future wars. (Standards: 1, 2, 3; Themes: TCC, GOV, TECH, EXCH)

8.6b. From 1939 to 1941, the United States government tried to maintain neutrality while providing aid to Britain but was drawn into the war by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The United States fought a war on multiple fronts. At home, the economy was converted to war production, and essential resources were rationed to ensure adequate supplies for military use.
8.6b.1. Students will examine American involvement in World War II, including the American strategy in the Pacific and the invasion of Normandy on D-Day.
World War II
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8.6c. The nature and consequences of warfare during World War II transformed the United States and the global community. The damage from total warfare and human atrocities, including the Holocaust, led to a call for an international organization to prevent future wars and the protection of human rights.
8.6c.1. Students will examine the role of air power by the allies, including the use of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
World War II
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8.6c.2. Students will investigate the Holocaust and explain the historical significance of the Nuremberg trials.
World War II
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8.6c.3. Students will examine the structure and work of the United Nations.
The New Millennium
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8.7. FOREIGN POLICY: The period after World War II has been characterized by an ideological and political struggle, first between the United States and communism during the Cold War, then between the United States and forces of instability in the Middle East. Increased economic interdependence and competition, as well as environmental concerns, are challenges faced by the United States. (Standards: 1, 2, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GEO, ECO, EXCH)

8.7b. The United States based its military and diplomatic policies from 1945 to 1990 on a policy of containment of communism.
8.7b.1. Students will examine the policy of containment and its application in the postwar period, including the Marshall Plan, the Korean War, the Cuban missile crisis, and the Vietnam War.
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
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8.7c. Following the end of the Cold War, the United States sought to define a new role in global affairs, but the legacies of Cold War actions continue to affect United States foreign policy today.
8.7c.1. Students will examine the changing relationships between the United States and foreign countries such as:
8.7c.1.b. Afghanistan beginning in the 1980s
The New Millennium
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8.7d. Terrorist groups not representing any nation entered and reshaped global military and political alliances and conflicts. American foreign and domestic policies responded to terrorism in a variety of ways.
8.7d.1. Students will examine the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, its effects on national security and the United States responses to it, including the USA Patriot Act, the formation of the Department of Homeland Security, the War on Terror, and military attacks on suspected terrorist locations.
The New Millennium
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8.7e. Increased globalization has led to increased economic interdependence and competition.
8.7e.1. Students will examine the increased economic interdependence in terms of globalization and its impact on the United States and New York State economy, including the workforce.
Economics
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8.9. DOMESTIC POLITICS AND REFORM: The civil rights movement and the Great Society were attempts by people and the government to address major social, legal, economic, and environmental problems. Subsequent economic recession called for a new economic program. (Standards: 1, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, SOC, CIV, ECO)

8.9a. The civil rights movement began in the postwar era in response to long-standing inequalities in American society, and eventually brought about equality under the law, but slower progress on economic improvements.
8.9a.1. Students will compare and contrast the strategies used by civil rights activists, such as Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X.
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.9a.2. Students will explain the significance of key civil rights victories, including President Truman’s desegregation of the military, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.9a.3. Students will examine the extent to which the economic situation of African Americans improved as a result of the civil rights movement.
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

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