California Content Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

CA.8. United States History and Geography: Growth and Conflict

8.1. Students understand the major events preceding the founding of the nation and relate their significance to the development of American constitutional democracy.

8.1.1. Describe the relationship between the moral and political ideas of the Great Awakening and the development of revolutionary fervor.
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.1.2. Analyze the philosophy of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence, with an emphasis on government as a means of securing individual rights (e.g., key phrases such as 'all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights').
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.2. Students analyze the political principles underlying the U.S. Constitution and compare the enumerated and implied powers of the federal government.

8.2.1. Discuss the significance of the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the May-flower Compact.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.2. Analyze the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution and the success of each in implementing the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.3. Evaluate the major debates that occurred during the development of the Constitution and their ultimate resolutions in such areas as shared power among institutions, divided state-federal power, slavery, the rights of individuals and states (later addressed by the addition of the Bill of Rights), and the status of American Indian nations under the commerce clause.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.4. Describe the political philosophy underpinning the Constitution as specified in the Federalist Papers (authored by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay) and the role of such leaders as Madison, George Washington, Roger Sherman, Gouverneur Morris, and James Wilson in the writing and ratification of the Constitution.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.5. Understand the significance of Jefferson's Statute for Religious Freedom as a forerunner of the First Amendment and the origins, purpose, and differing views of the founding fathers on the issue of the separation of church and state.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.6. Enumerate the powers of government set forth in the Constitution and the fundamental liberties ensured by the Bill of Rights.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.3. Students understand the foundation of the American political system and the ways in which citizens participate in it.

8.3.2. Explain how the ordinances of 1785 and 1787 privatized national resources and transferred federally owned lands into private holdings, townships, and states.
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.3. Enumerate the advantages of a common market among the states as foreseen in and protected by the Constitution's clauses on interstate commerce, common coinage, and full-faith and credit.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.4. Understand how the conflicts between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton resulted in the emergence of two political parties (e.g., view of foreign policy, Alien and Sedition Acts, economic policy, National Bank, funding and assumption of the revolutionary debt).
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.5. Know the significance of domestic resistance movements and ways in which the central government responded to such movements (e.g., Shays' Rebellion, the Whiskey Rebellion).
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.6. Describe the basic law-making process and how the Constitution provides numerous opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process and to monitor and influence government (e.g., function of elections, political parties, interest groups).
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
One of the biggest reform goals was the process in which government officials were elected. This, along with the need for government involvement in reform, were two of the motivating factors for people such as Eugene Debs, Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. DuBois to become leaders during the Progressive Era. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.3.7. Understand the functions and responsibilities of a free press.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.4. Students analyze the aspirations and ideals of the people of the new nation.

8.4.1. Describe the country's physical landscapes, political divisions, and territorial expansion during the terms of the first four presidents.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.4.2. Explain the policy significance of famous speeches (e.g., Washington's Farewell Address, Jefferson's 1801 Inaugural Address, John Q. Adams's Fourth of July 1821 Address).
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.5. Students analyze U.S. foreign policy in the early Republic.

8.5.1. Understand the political and economic causes and consequences of the War of 1812 and know the major battles, leaders, and events that led to a final peace.
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.5.2. Know the changing boundaries of the United States and describe the relationships the country had with its neighbors (current Mexico and Canada) and Europe, including the influence of the Monroe Doctrine, and how those relationships influenced westward expansion and the Mexican-American War.
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.6. Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.

8.6.1. Discuss the influence of industrialization and technological developments on the region, including human modification of the landscape and how physical geography shaped human actions (e.g., growth of cities, deforestation, farming, mineral extraction).
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.6.2. Outline the physical obstacles to and the economic and political factors involved in building a network of roads, canals, and railroads (e.g., Henry Clay's American System).
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.6.4. Study the lives of black Americans who gained freedom in the North and founded schools and churches to advance their rights and communities.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.6.6. Examine the women's suffrage movement (e.g., biographies, writings, and speeches of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Margaret Fuller, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony).
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.7. Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the South from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.

8.7.1. Describe the development of the agrarian economy in the South, identify the locations of the cotton-producing states, and discuss the significance of cotton and the cotton gin.
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.7.2. Trace the origins and development of slavery; its effects on black Americans and on the region's political, social, religious, economic, and cultural development; and identify the strategies that were tried to both overturn and preserve it (e.g., through the writings and historical documents on Nat Turner, Denmark Vesey).
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.7.4. Compare the lives of and opportunities for free blacks in the North with those of free blacks in the South.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.8. Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.

8.8.1. Discuss the election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828, the importance of Jacksonian democracy, and his actions as president (e.g., the spoils system, veto of the National Bank, policy of Indian removal, opposition to the Supreme Court).
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.8.2. Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives associated with westward expansion, including the concept of Manifest Destiny (e.g., the Lewis and Clark expedition, accounts of the removal of Indians, the Cherokees' 'Trail of Tears,' settlement of the Great Plains) and the territorial acquisitions that spanned numerous decades.
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.8.5. Discuss Mexican settlements and their locations, cultural traditions, attitudes toward slavery, land-grant system, and economies.
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.8.6. Describe the Texas War for Independence and the Mexican-American War, including territorial settlements, the aftermath of the wars, and the effects the wars had on the lives of Americans, including Mexican Americans today.
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.9. Students analyze the early and steady attempts to abolish slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.

8.9.1. Describe the leaders of the movement (e.g., John Quincy Adams and his proposed constitutional amendment, John Brown and the armed resistance, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Benjamin Franklin, Theodore Weld, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass).
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.3. Describe the significance of the Northwest Ordinance in education and in the banning of slavery in new states north of the Ohio River.
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.9.4. Discuss the importance of the slavery issue as raised by the annexation of Texas and California's admission to the union as a free state under the Compromise of 1850.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.5. Analyze the significance of the States's Rights Doctrine, the Missouri Compromise (1820), the Wilmot Proviso (1846), the Compromise of 1850, Henry Clay's role in the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854), the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857), and the Lincoln-Douglas debates (1858).
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.6. Describe the lives of free blacks and the laws that limited their freedom and economic opportunities.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.10. Students analyze the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.

8.10.4. Discuss Abraham Lincoln's presidency and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as his 'House Divided' speech (1858), Gettysburg Address (1863), Emancipation Proclamation (1863), and inaugural addresses (1861 and 1865).
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.10.5. Study the views and lives of leaders (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee) and soldiers on both sides of the war, including those of black soldiers and regiments.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.10.6. Describe critical developments and events in the war, including the major battles, geographical advantages and obstacles, technological advances, and General Lee's surrender at Appomattox.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.10.7. Explain how the war affected combatants, civilians, the physical environment, and future warfare.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.11. Students analyze the character and lasting consequences of Reconstruction.

8.11.1. List the original aims of Reconstruction and describe its effects on the political and social structures of different regions.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.3. Understand the effects of the Freedmen's Bureau and the restrictions placed on the rights and opportunities of freedmen, including racial segregation and 'Jim Crow' laws.
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Despite being citizens in theory, many black citizens were not granted the same constitutional rights as other American citizens. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.5. Understand the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution and analyze their connection to Reconstruction.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.12. Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Indus-trial Revolution.

8.12.3. Explain how states and the federal government encouraged business expansion through tariffs, banking, land grants, and subsidies.
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.12.4. Discuss entrepreneurs, industrialists, and bankers in politics, commerce, and industry (e.g., Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Leland Stanford).
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.12.5. Examine the location and effects of urbanization, renewed immigration, and industrialization (e.g., the effects on social fabric of cities, wealth and economic opportunity, the conservation movement).
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.12.6. Discuss child labor, working conditions, and laissez-faire policies toward big business and examine the labor movement, including its leaders (e.g., Samuel Gompers), its demand for collective bargaining, and its strikes and protests over labor conditions.
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.12.7. Identify the new sources of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to the building of cities and the economy; explain the ways in which new social and economic patterns encouraged assimilation of newcomers into the mainstream amidst growing cultural diversity; and discuss the new wave of nativism.
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.12.9. Name the significant inventors and their inventions and identify how they improved the quality of life (e.g., Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, Orville and Wilbur Wright).
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

CA.6-8.HSSA. Historical and Social Sciences Analysis Skills: The intellectual skills noted below are to be learned through, and applied to, the content standards for grades six through eight. They are to be assessed only in conjunction with the content standards in grades six through eight. In addition to the standards for grades six through eight, students demonstrate the following intellectual reasoning, reflection, and research skills.

6-8.CST. Chronological and Spatial Thinking

6-8.CST.1. Students explain how major events are related to one another in time.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
The issue of global warming has been the cause of much debate in the past fifty years. Greenhouse gases, overpopulation, fossil fuel usage, and deforestation have been at the top of the list of reasons that the world’s environment is changing for the worse. Many plants and animals are becoming extinct due to these environmental changes. Industrialization and overpopulation have caused a decrease in land available for other species. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.CST.3. Students use a variety of maps and documents to identify physical and cultural features of neighborhoods, cities, states, and countries and to explain the historical migration of people, expansion and disintegration of empires, and the growth of economic systems.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.REP. Research, Evidence, and Point

6-8.REP.1. Students frame questions that can be answered by historical study and research.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

6-8.HI. Historical Interpretation

6-8.HI.1. Students explain the central issues and problems from the past, placing people and events in a matrix of time and place.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
One of the biggest reform goals was the process in which government officials were elected. This, along with the need for government involvement in reform, were two of the motivating factors for people such as Eugene Debs, Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. DuBois to become leaders during the Progressive Era. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Despite being citizens in theory, many black citizens were not granted the same constitutional rights as other American citizens. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Central America is the small isthmus that separates the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and connects North America and South America. It is made up of these seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Costa Rica. Central America is considered a Mesoamerican civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
South America includes twelve sovereign states: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana (a part of France). In addition, the ABC islands of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Falkland Islands, (a British Overseas Territory), Trinidad and Tobago, and Panama may also be considered part of South America. Read more...iWorksheets :3
6-8.HI.2. Students understand and distinguish cause, effect, sequence, and correlation in historical events, including the long-and short-term causal relations.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
The issue of global warming has been the cause of much debate in the past fifty years. Greenhouse gases, overpopulation, fossil fuel usage, and deforestation have been at the top of the list of reasons that the world’s environment is changing for the worse. Many plants and animals are becoming extinct due to these environmental changes. Industrialization and overpopulation have caused a decrease in land available for other species. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.HI.3. Students explain the sources of historical continuity and how the combination of ideas and events explains the emergence of new patterns.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.HI.4. Students recognize the role of chance, oversight, and error in history.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.HI.5. Students recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
6-8.HI.6. Students interpret basic indicators of economic performance and conduct cost-benefit analyses of economic and political issues.
Economics
The functions of an economy depend largely on the goods and services that are created by the producers. In any economy, the consumers are the people who buy or exchange money or goods, and without the demand or need for goods the economy would be unsuccessful. The difference in the cost of retail sale and the cost of production is the meaning of profit for a business, and is also the goal of producers and businesses. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

CA.CC.RH.6-8. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Craft and Structure

RH.6-8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
One of the biggest reform goals was the process in which government officials were elected. This, along with the need for government involvement in reform, were two of the motivating factors for people such as Eugene Debs, Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. DuBois to become leaders during the Progressive Era. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Despite being citizens in theory, many black citizens were not granted the same constitutional rights as other American citizens. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
The area that is called Mesopotamia is an ancient region of land located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers that saw the rise of many civilizations. Because of the relationship to the two rivers, these civilizations, like many modern-day cities, thrived culturally. The Sumerians are credited with the creation of the first system of writing, irrigation, an advanced knowledge of mathematics, and the twelve month calendar. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Ancient Egypt refers to the people and area surrounding the Nile River in Africa. This period of history called Ancient Egypt extends beyond the 3000 BC-1200 BC era. During this time period, Ancient Egypt saw the rise of the Early Dynastic Period to the fall of the New Kingdom. Many things happened during those times, such as the creation of the pyramids, the creation of paper, and the growth of a writing system called hieroglyphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
The history of Ancient Israel is documented in one of the world’s most widely read books: the Bible. This history is told through the lives of famous biblical characters as well as remains and inscriptions found in the Middle East. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the three founding patriarchs of Israel, settled in Canaan almost four thousand years ago. The people of Canaan were divided into tribes and were ruled by judges. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Phoenicia (1000-300 BC) was an ancient civilization in Asia that was made up of a number of city-states. The most prominent city-state in Phoenicia was Carthage, a city that is still a part of Asia. The Phoenicians were a polytheistic culture and celebrated many gods and goddesses. Phoenicia was well known for the extensive trading network they established during their rise as a civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
To define Ancient Greece (800-200 BC) is to define an area that surrounds the modern-day country of Greece and the culture that it represents. In ancient times, the city-states of Greece expanded their culture and influence to many other places. Ancient Greece is also well known for its contributions to literature, art, science and mathematics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome (500 BC-500 AD) is characterized by many different leaders, governments and events. The history of ancient Rome spans a number of centuries, and is divided into three main categories: the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Ancient Rome is also known for many famous leaders. Caesar, Augustus, Constantine and Nero are just a few of the historic figures that led to the expansion of Rome. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Central America is the small isthmus that separates the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and connects North America and South America. It is made up of these seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Costa Rica. Central America is considered a Mesoamerican civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
South America includes twelve sovereign states: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana (a part of France). In addition, the ABC islands of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Falkland Islands, (a British Overseas Territory), Trinidad and Tobago, and Panama may also be considered part of South America. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Economics
The functions of an economy depend largely on the goods and services that are created by the producers. In any economy, the consumers are the people who buy or exchange money or goods, and without the demand or need for goods the economy would be unsuccessful. The difference in the cost of retail sale and the cost of production is the meaning of profit for a business, and is also the goal of producers and businesses. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
RH.6-8.5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
One of the biggest reform goals was the process in which government officials were elected. This, along with the need for government involvement in reform, were two of the motivating factors for people such as Eugene Debs, Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. DuBois to become leaders during the Progressive Era. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Despite being citizens in theory, many black citizens were not granted the same constitutional rights as other American citizens. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
The area that is called Mesopotamia is an ancient region of land located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers that saw the rise of many civilizations. Because of the relationship to the two rivers, these civilizations, like many modern-day cities, thrived culturally. The Sumerians are credited with the creation of the first system of writing, irrigation, an advanced knowledge of mathematics, and the twelve month calendar. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Ancient Egypt refers to the people and area surrounding the Nile River in Africa. This period of history called Ancient Egypt extends beyond the 3000 BC-1200 BC era. During this time period, Ancient Egypt saw the rise of the Early Dynastic Period to the fall of the New Kingdom. Many things happened during those times, such as the creation of the pyramids, the creation of paper, and the growth of a writing system called hieroglyphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
The history of Ancient Israel is documented in one of the world’s most widely read books: the Bible. This history is told through the lives of famous biblical characters as well as remains and inscriptions found in the Middle East. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the three founding patriarchs of Israel, settled in Canaan almost four thousand years ago. The people of Canaan were divided into tribes and were ruled by judges. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Phoenicia (1000-300 BC) was an ancient civilization in Asia that was made up of a number of city-states. The most prominent city-state in Phoenicia was Carthage, a city that is still a part of Asia. The Phoenicians were a polytheistic culture and celebrated many gods and goddesses. Phoenicia was well known for the extensive trading network they established during their rise as a civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
To define Ancient Greece (800-200 BC) is to define an area that surrounds the modern-day country of Greece and the culture that it represents. In ancient times, the city-states of Greece expanded their culture and influence to many other places. Ancient Greece is also well known for its contributions to literature, art, science and mathematics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome (500 BC-500 AD) is characterized by many different leaders, governments and events. The history of ancient Rome spans a number of centuries, and is divided into three main categories: the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Ancient Rome is also known for many famous leaders. Caesar, Augustus, Constantine and Nero are just a few of the historic figures that led to the expansion of Rome. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Central America is the small isthmus that separates the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and connects North America and South America. It is made up of these seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Costa Rica. Central America is considered a Mesoamerican civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
South America includes twelve sovereign states: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana (a part of France). In addition, the ABC islands of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Falkland Islands, (a British Overseas Territory), Trinidad and Tobago, and Panama may also be considered part of South America. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Economics
The functions of an economy depend largely on the goods and services that are created by the producers. In any economy, the consumers are the people who buy or exchange money or goods, and without the demand or need for goods the economy would be unsuccessful. The difference in the cost of retail sale and the cost of production is the meaning of profit for a business, and is also the goal of producers and businesses. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
The issue of global warming has been the cause of much debate in the past fifty years. Greenhouse gases, overpopulation, fossil fuel usage, and deforestation have been at the top of the list of reasons that the world’s environment is changing for the worse. Many plants and animals are becoming extinct due to these environmental changes. Industrialization and overpopulation have caused a decrease in land available for other species. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

RH.6-8.10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Around the turn of the 19th century, many changes were occurring in the United States. The industrialization of what had previously been rural and agricultural land led to a different lifestyle for many people. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
During the 18th and 19th century, there was a need for more advanced ways of trade and travel in the United States. One method of travel, by waterway, had proved successful in other parts of the world. The Erie Canal was America’s answer to the need for transportation across New York. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Andrew Jackson was an influential leader in the 19th century, known for many reforms to the American government and society during his presidency. President Jackson is credited for the founding of the Democratic Party. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Manifest Destiny was the idea that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This motivated the government to acquire lands in the Oregon Territory as well as in areas that became Texas, Florida, and California. Many people started to move west in hope of a better life. The California Gold Rush triggered a large movement of people to California. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
In 1848, leaders of what became the Women’s Rights Movement invited Americans to attend the Seneca Falls Convention to discuss the need for women to have the rights of suffrage (voting), education, and others. They devised a document, modeled after the Declaration of Independence, of resolutions promoting women’s civil rights. The “Declaration of Sentiments” was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
After Lincoln was elected in 1860, southern states seceded from the Union in an effort to uphold their stance on slavery. During the war, the Confederacy continued to own slaves and support slavery. After many devastating battles and thousands of casualties, the Civil War ended but many problems that existed before the commencement of battle still existed. However, slaves were officially free and the economies of the North and South were in a new era of growth. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
After the Civil War and Reconstruction, the United States began to see a rise in industry and the growth of businesses. The Transcontinental Railroad, the first railroad to span the United States from Atlantic to Pacific, opened up the opportunity for social and economical growth towards the West. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
One of the biggest reform goals was the process in which government officials were elected. This, along with the need for government involvement in reform, were two of the motivating factors for people such as Eugene Debs, Susan B. Anthony and W.E.B. DuBois to become leaders during the Progressive Era. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Over the past two centuries, the Unites States has sought to expand its territories both in North America and other parts of the world. While one of the biggest reasons for this is to continue economic growth, during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, America found itself in a position to demonstrate its strength by intervening in other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
During the first half of the 20th century, European countries were struggling for control over land and sea. Many countries wanted to establish new colonies in newly discovered territory, which led to power struggles across Europe. Technological advancements also attributed to the beginning of World War I. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
The 1920’s were a time of social, economical, and political change in the United States. After World War I, the economy changed drastically. Men and women began to raise their standards of living, spending money on new technologies that they put on credit. Cars began to become a huge influence on society, and soon millions of people owned Ford’s invention. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
In the last years of the decade commonly referred to as the Roaring Twenties, the United States saw a great gap between the rich and the poor citizens. Businesses and corporations were booming and productivity rose. However, increased production and decreased consumption took its toll and eventually the American people saw a drastic fall in the stock market. The stock market crash virtually ruined the American economy of the time and the greater part of the next decade was spent trying to reverse the damage. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
After World War I and the Great Depression, many countries all over the world were trying to come back from an economic recession. Adolf Hitler, the leader of a party developed a philosophy for Germany and ignore the Treaty of Versailles. Soon, Germany was at war with many European countries and so began the reign of the Nazi Party. Germany soon invaded Poland and World War II was set in motion. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Despite being citizens in theory, many black citizens were not granted the same constitutional rights as other American citizens. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a war fought over decades in the mid to late 20th century. It is considered to be connected to the Cold War, and many of the causes of the conflict have roots imbedded in the fear of the spread of Communism that was at the front of the Cold War. Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, wanted independence for Vietnam and a Communist-run government. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Global conflicts have increased over time and the United States has seen the effects of this in the new millennium. On September 11th, 2001 the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were targets of terrorist attacks. As a result of this, the United States declared a “War on Terror” and has since seen the loss of many American lives. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
The area that is called Mesopotamia is an ancient region of land located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers that saw the rise of many civilizations. Because of the relationship to the two rivers, these civilizations, like many modern-day cities, thrived culturally. The Sumerians are credited with the creation of the first system of writing, irrigation, an advanced knowledge of mathematics, and the twelve month calendar. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Ancient Egypt refers to the people and area surrounding the Nile River in Africa. This period of history called Ancient Egypt extends beyond the 3000 BC-1200 BC era. During this time period, Ancient Egypt saw the rise of the Early Dynastic Period to the fall of the New Kingdom. Many things happened during those times, such as the creation of the pyramids, the creation of paper, and the growth of a writing system called hieroglyphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
The history of Ancient Israel is documented in one of the world’s most widely read books: the Bible. This history is told through the lives of famous biblical characters as well as remains and inscriptions found in the Middle East. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the three founding patriarchs of Israel, settled in Canaan almost four thousand years ago. The people of Canaan were divided into tribes and were ruled by judges. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Phoenicia (1000-300 BC) was an ancient civilization in Asia that was made up of a number of city-states. The most prominent city-state in Phoenicia was Carthage, a city that is still a part of Asia. The Phoenicians were a polytheistic culture and celebrated many gods and goddesses. Phoenicia was well known for the extensive trading network they established during their rise as a civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
To define Ancient Greece (800-200 BC) is to define an area that surrounds the modern-day country of Greece and the culture that it represents. In ancient times, the city-states of Greece expanded their culture and influence to many other places. Ancient Greece is also well known for its contributions to literature, art, science and mathematics. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome (500 BC-500 AD) is characterized by many different leaders, governments and events. The history of ancient Rome spans a number of centuries, and is divided into three main categories: the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Ancient Rome is also known for many famous leaders. Caesar, Augustus, Constantine and Nero are just a few of the historic figures that led to the expansion of Rome. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Mexico is a country located in North America; it neighbors the United States to the South and shares a border that spans from California to Texas. While parts of Mexico are home to snow covered mountains, the country is also known for its beautiful beaches and lush rainforests. After the Spanish exploration of the Americas, Mexico was under Spanish rule until they declared independence in the 19th century. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Central America is the small isthmus that separates the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and connects North America and South America. It is made up of these seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Costa Rica. Central America is considered a Mesoamerican civilization. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
South America includes twelve sovereign states: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana (a part of France). In addition, the ABC islands of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Falkland Islands, (a British Overseas Territory), Trinidad and Tobago, and Panama may also be considered part of South America. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Economics
The functions of an economy depend largely on the goods and services that are created by the producers. In any economy, the consumers are the people who buy or exchange money or goods, and without the demand or need for goods the economy would be unsuccessful. The difference in the cost of retail sale and the cost of production is the meaning of profit for a business, and is also the goal of producers and businesses. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
The issue of global warming has been the cause of much debate in the past fifty years. Greenhouse gases, overpopulation, fossil fuel usage, and deforestation have been at the top of the list of reasons that the world’s environment is changing for the worse. Many plants and animals are becoming extinct due to these environmental changes. Industrialization and overpopulation have caused a decrease in land available for other species. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

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