Oklahoma Academic Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War I
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
World War II
Worksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

Social Studies Practices PK-12

3 Acquire, Apply, and Evaluate Evidence – Students will utilize interdisciplinary tools and master the basic concepts of the social studies in order to acquire and apply content understanding in all related fields of study.

3.B. Students will demonstrate an understanding of geographic concepts and develop mastery of geographic tools and ways of thinking in order to become geographically informed.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.C. Students will analyze the principles of economic systems and develop an understanding of the benefits of a market system in local, national, and global settings.
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

4 Read Critically and Interpret Informational Sources – Students will engage in critical, active reading of grade-level appropriate primary and secondary sources related to key social studies concepts, including frequent analysis and interpretation of informational sources.

4.A. Students will comprehend, evaluate, and synthesize textual sources to acquire and refine knowledge in the social studies.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
Worksheets :3
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.B. Students will apply critical reading and thinking skills to interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts from historical, ethnic, and global perspectives.
Geographic Map Terms
There are many geographical settings that make up the earth’s surface. Many of these characteristics can be seen on maps as well as from satellites because of their size. Many land formations are a result of weather and time, and often they can co-exist with one another. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geographic Tools
Throughout history, many different tools have been used to transfer graphical information. Graphs, charts, and maps are a few ways that we can represent ideas and places. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Medieval Europe
The document entitled “The Articles of Confederation” was the first governing document of the United States. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handled and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Some new Acts were added to the Articles of Confederation. The Land Ordinance of 1785 was an example of this. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Renaissance in Europe
What do you know about the Renaissance in Europe? The European Renaissance was a time of social, scientific, artistic, and religious rebirth. From 1463 to 1650, inventors, artists, philosophers, and scientists created and brought to light new ideas and perspectives that changed the shape of society and daily life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Protestant Reformation
After the Renaissance, there was a change in thought throughout Europe. The Catholic Church was having financial problems and its role with several Kings and governments had changed; it was claimed that the Church had too much influence, and that clergy members were receiving indulgences or gifts in exchange for important Church Sacraments, such as forgiveness of sins. One man, Martin Luther, challenged the Church and their actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Scientific Revolution
FreeThe Scientific Revolution changed the way that many people saw the world. The work of scientists and philosophers revolutionized the beliefs that had been accepted for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years. Some notable leaders of the Scientific Revolution are Isaac Newton, Galileo, Nicholas Copernicus, and Andreas Vesalius among others. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European Exploration and Settlement
European exploration in North America began with Christopher Columbus’ discovery of what he thought was Asia. Since that time, there have many attempts by Europeans to settle in America, some successful, others not. There are many reasons why Europeans settled outside of Europe. Political, social, and economic forces encouraged the exploration of the New World, and money was almost always a motivating factor in the settlement of new colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Aztecs
The Aztecs lived in the area that is now Mexico, and were one of the largest Mesoamerican societies. The Aztecs were a complex society with a governmental structure advanced for their time. The Aztecs were also known for their religious ceremonies and great temples that were built to honor their gods. The Aztecs believed in human sacrifice and were quite brutal in the sacrificial rites. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Maya
In the 1st century, a group of people called the Maya rose to civilization in Central and South America. Their society was very interactive and organized around individual city states, each with their own governmental system. They created a system of writing which consisted of individual symbols to represent sounds and words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Incas
The Incas were a civilization that lived in South America, the largest civilization to have existed in that region up to the time of their rule. The Incan people conquered much of South America using force and warfare, but treated those they conquered quite well. The Incas lacked the use of wheeled vehicles. They lacked animals to ride and draft animals that could pull wagons. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
Life in the new colonies was often challenging. While the settlers were free from the restrictions of life in European society, they also did not have the amenities of European life in the 1600s. Many families in the colonies worked on a small farm. The roles of society in colonial America were clearly defined. Men were the decision-makers, and women were in a supporting role. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Erie Canal
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive Era
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Expansionism
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War I
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Roaring Twenties
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Great Depression
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War II
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Cold War
During and after World War II, tension between the United States and the USSR grew. Stalin was disappointed in many of the United States' decisions regarding post-war aid and nuclear research. As a result of this, the Soviet Union had little trust in the United states and President Truman. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Vietnam War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
The New Millennium
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mesopotamia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Egypt
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Israel
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Phoenicia
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Greece
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient Rome
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient China
FreeThe history of Ancient China spans thousands of years and a number of different dynasties. Certain Chinese dynasties lasted hundreds of years, while others were overthrown and replaced quickly by new leaders. Despite this, much of Chinese culture and religion was steadfast. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mexico
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Central America
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
South America
Worksheets :3
Economics
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Environmental Changes
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1

8th Grade Content Standards

8.1. The student will analyze the foundations of the United States by examining the causes, events, and ideologies which led to the American Revolution.

8.1.2. Summarize the political and economic consequences of the French and Indian War including imperial policies of taxation, the Proclamation of 1763, and the migration of colonists into American Indian sovereign territories.
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.3. Summarize British attempts to regulate the colonies and colonial responses including:
8.1.3.A. Sugar Act
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.3.G. Boston Massacre
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.3.I. Coercive Acts (Intolerable Acts)
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.3.K. British raids on Lexington and Concord
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.4. Analyze the significance of the Second Continental Congress including:
8.1.4.E. committee to draft a declaration of independence
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.5. Analyze the ideological and propaganda war between Great Britain and the colonies including:
8.1.5.C. use of Paul Revere’s engraving of the Boston Massacre
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.5.D. rejection of the Olive Branch Petition
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Canada
Canada has a rich history of being home to many aboriginal peoples, including Indian tribes and the Inuit. When European explorers began to reach Canada, they found a land rich in resources and began to settle in this area of North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.6. Examine the central ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence, drafted by Thomas Jefferson and adopted July 4, 1776, and their intellectual origins including:
8.1.6.C. the purpose of government as a social contract requiring the consent of the governed
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.1.6.D. economic and political grievances against British policies
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.2. The student will examine key military and diplomatic events of the Revolutionary War that resulted in an independent nation.

8.2.1. Explain the purpose of the Articles of Confederation which established the first American national system of government to support and conduct a war against Britain.
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.3. Identify and evaluate the contributions of individuals and significant groups toward winning independence from British rule.
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the British and the American colonists including political and military leadership, military strength, population and resources, motivation, foreign alliances, financial and military support, and the British recruitment of enslaved black men in exchange for freedom.
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.5. Summarize the impact of key military and diplomatic events of the Revolutionary War including:
8.2.5.A. military leadership of General George Washington
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.2.5.B. victories at Boston, Trenton, and Saratoga
The American Revolution
In the second half of the 18th century, the colonies began to seek independence from Great Britain. One of the main causes of the Revolutionary War was the colonist’s reaction to the taxes being placed on the necessary goods and activities of the colonies. The Revolutionary War began in 1775, when colonial militias began to fight against the British army. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.3. The student will examine the formation of the American system of government following the Revolutionary War and the creation of the Constitution of the United States as the supreme law of the land.

8.3.1. Examine the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation that led to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, including:
8.3.1.A. resolution of disputes over the western territories as resolved by the Northwest Ordinance
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.B. organization and leadership necessary to win the war
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.C. lack of a common national currency
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.D. lack of a common defense
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.E. lack of a national judiciary
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.F. mismanagement of war debts due to an inability to tax
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.G. unanimous vote required to amend the Articles of Confederation
Colonial Settlement
Europe was a leader in the settlement of colonies in America. Although their attempts were not always successful, by the turn of the 17th century they had a pretty firm start in the New World. Jamestown, the first successful settlement, was founded in 1607 by a stock company searching for gold. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.1.H. civil unrest as typified in Shays’ Rebellion
The Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. The Articles of Confederation made the laws regarding how the newly united colonies handles and shared money, reacted to war, and settled disputes. Once the Articles were in use, it became clear that some additions needed to be made for effective governance. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.2. Analyze the significance of the Constitutional Convention, contributions of the Framers, major debates and compromises including the Virginia and New Jersey Plans, Great Compromise, the leadership of James Madison, Father of the Constitution, and George Washington, President of the Convention.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.4. Explain the significance of the Commerce Clause in establishing a constitutional relationship between Indian tribes and the United States government.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.5. Examine the concept of self-government, the purpose, and the responsibilities of government as expressed in the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.6. Analyze the key principles of government established by the Constitution of the United States including:
8.3.6.D. popular sovereignty and consent of the governed
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.8. Explain how the Constitution of the United States was amended to include the Bill of Rights; identify and analyze the guarantees of individual rights and liberties as expressed in each of the ten amendments.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.3.9. Identify the structure and responsibilities of the elected and appointed officials of the three branches of government in relationship to the legislative process, including the role of Congress and the President, as well as the Supreme Court’s power of judicial review.
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.4. The student will examine the political and economic changes that occurred during the Early Federal Period.

8.4.1. Analyze the impact of the Whiskey Rebellion and enforcement of the government’s right to tax.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.4.4. Evaluate the impact of the Alien and Sedition Acts on individual rights during the Adams Administration, including the responses of the Democratic-Republicans in the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.5. The student will analyze the political and geographic changes that occurred during the Jeffersonian Era.

8.5.3. Analyze the acquisition of the Louisiana territory, the contributions of the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition, and the eventual establishment of the Indian Territory.
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.6. The student will examine the political, economic and social transformations during the “Era of Good Feelings”.

8.6.1. Explain how the War of 1812 confirmed American independence and fueled a spirit of nationalism, reflected in the lyrics of our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner, by Francis Scott Key.
The New Government in Operation
After the signing of the Constitution, the leaders and citizens of the United States had many goals and aspirations for the growth of the nation. One type of growth was the interest in expanding the existing boundaries of the new country. The first of these initiatives was the Louisiana Purchase, under President Thomas Jefferson. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.6.2. Examine the Monroe Doctrine as a policy of isolationism which was designed to protect American interests in the Western Hemisphere.
Expansionism
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8.6.4. Examine the increased tension between Southern sectionalist and Northern nationalist perspectives.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.7. The student will examine the political, economic and social transformations of the Jacksonian Era.

8.7.1. Describe the factors that led to the election of Andrew Jackson including the “Corrupt Bargain” election of 1824, the expansion of voting rights, and Jackson’s political success by identifying with the “common man”.
The Jackson Age
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8.7.3. Analyze the impact of Jackson’s policies and decisions concerning American Indian nations and their tribal sovereignty as a nation’s inherent right to self-govern, including:
8.7.3.A. non-adherence to federal treaties
The Jackson Age
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8.7.3.C. forced removals of American Indians
The Jackson Age
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8.8. The student will examine the political, economic, social, and geographic changes that occurred during the period of westward expansion.

8.8.1. Examine the concept and opposing perspectives toward Manifest Destiny as a motivation and justification for westward expansion.
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.8.2. Explain the territorial growth of the United States including the annexation of Texas, Mexican Cession, and the Gadsden Purchase; describe the need to maintain a balance of “free” and “slave” states.
The Alamo
The Alamo was a fort in Texas that became the defining point of a conflict between Texan-Americans and the Republic of Mexico. The Texans were part of Mexico but wanted to be part of the United States. A major battle in this conflict happened at the Alamo on March 6, 1836. Today it is a museum in the Alamo Plaza Historic District. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Moving Southward and Westward
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Mexico
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8.8.3. Identify push and pull factors of mass migration and the settlement of western territories including the California Gold Rush, settlement of Oregon, and the Mormon migration.
Moving Southward and Westward
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.8.4. Analyze the consequences of westward expansion, including the impact on the culture of American Indians and their homelands, and the growing sectional tensions regarding the expansion of slavery.
The Jackson Age
Worksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

8.9. The student will analyze the social and economic transformations of the early nineteenth century.

8.9.1. Explain the impact of the Industrial Revolution in the North including the concentration of population, manufacturing, and transportation.
The Nation Grows and Expands
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Industrial Growth
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8.9.2. Describe the plantation system and its reliance on a slave labor system in the South, including how Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin increased the profitability of the crop and led to the expansion of slavery.
The Nation Grows and Expands
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.9.3. Compare perspectives and experiences of both free and enslaved blacks including the:
8.9.3.B. everyday acts of resistance to slavery
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.3.C. efforts of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.9.3.E. legal restrictions and Slave Codes
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.4. Summarize the impact of the Abolitionist Movement including the writings and work of Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.9.5. Identify the ideals, significance, and key leaders of the Second Great Awakening and the Women’s Suffrage Movement, including the Declaration of Sentiments and the leadership of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Women's Rights
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8.10. The student will analyze major political, economic, and social events that resulted in the Civil War.

8.10.1. Summarize the importance of slavery as the principal cause of increased sectional polarization leading to the Civil War.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.10.2. Evaluate the goals of the Compromise of 1850 regarding the issue of slavery.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.10.4. Analyze the impact of the Kansas-Nebraska Act on the issue of popular sovereignty in new territories regarding the institution of slavery, repeal of the Missouri Compromise, and factional feuds in Bleeding Kansas.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
8.10.5. Summarize the Dred Scott v. Sanford case which declared slaves as property and motivated John Brown’s Raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.11. The student will analyze the course and consequences of the Civil War.

8.11.1. Analyze the immediate impact of the presidential election of 1860 including:
8.11.1.D. Confederate attack on Fort Sumter
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.2. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the Union and the Confederacy including natural resources, population, industrialization, and the military leadership of Ulysses S Grant and Robert E. Lee.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
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8.11.3. Evaluate the impact and contributions of specific groups in the Civil War including free and enslaved African Americans, American Indians, women, and immigrants.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.4. Discuss the key strategies utilized during the war, such as the Anaconda Plan, Total War, and the southern defense strategy.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.5. Summarize the significance of the key battles of the war, including Antietam, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.11.6. Analyze the Emancipation Proclamation, including its role in expanding the goals of the war and its impact on slavery; identify the significance of Juneteenth in relationship to emancipation.
The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement started with the denunciation of slavery by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, a religion community of believers in equality and peace. After their public resistance to slavery, many other groups of people joined their fight for the abolition of slavery. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The Civil War
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8.11.7. Explain how the Gettysburg Address clarified the Union’s motivation for winning the war.
The Civil War
Worksheets :4Study Guides :1

8.12. The student will analyze the political, social, and economic transformations during the Reconstruction Era to 1877.

8.12.1. Compare the major plans and policies proposed for Reconstruction.
Causes of the Civil War
FreeIn the 1800's, America was expanding and gaining new territories. The issue of slavery was everywhere and there was much conflict over whether or not the new territories should be slave states or not. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Civil War
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8.12.2. Analyze the impact of state and federal legislation following the Civil War including:
8.12.2.A. 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
The United States Constitution
The United States Constitution is a document created by a group of delegates to the Constitutional Convention after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The need for a governing document other than the Articles of Confederation was growing clear to the Constitutional Congress, and so they came together to devise a new document. The Constitution is the absolute law in the United States and has been that way since 1789. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.12.2.B. Black Codes and Jim Crow laws
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil Rights
The American Civil Rights Movement developed as many worked to ensure equality and civil rights for many groups, mainly African Americans. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.12.2.C. establishment of the Freedmen’s Bureau
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.12.3. Compare the emerging social structure of the South including the:
8.12.3.C. election of blacks to government positions
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.12.3.E. migration of former slaves
Reconstruction after the Civil War
The years after the Civil War were dedicated to trying to resolve the problems that were not only the cause of the war but were aggravated by four years of fighting between the Union and the Confederacy. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
8.12.5. Evaluate the impact of federal policies including:
8.12.5.D. the development of the Transcontinental Railroad
Industrial Growth
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