Tennessee Academic Standards for Fourth Grade English Language Arts

Adjectives/Adverbs/ParticlesWhat is adverb? An adverb is a word or an expression that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group, expressing a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, degree, level of certainty, answering questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent? Read more...iWorksheets: 3
AnalogiesAn analogy is a statement that compares two things that have something in common. Sometimes the two things being compared are alike. Sometimes the two things being compared are different. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Cause/Effect, Fact/OpinionWhat is Cause & Effect? A cause always has an effect. There is a reason why something happens. An effect happens as a result of a cause. Something happens for a reason. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Drawing ConclusionsFreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
High Frequency Words IHigh frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
High Frequency Words IIHigh frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
InferencesInferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Labels/Captions for GraphicsWrite labels and captions for graphics. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
NounsA noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
PluralsPlurals is the grammatical category in nouns, pronouns, and verbs that refers to more than one thing. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Poetic DevicesStudents use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
PredictionsWhat are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Spelling WordsWhy is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Syntactic/Semantic CuesSyntactic cues involve word order, patterns and rules of language, and punctuation. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Text Feature MeaningText features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Title/Author in Well Known LiteratureDiscuss and share favorite authors, books, and genres with others: Lewis Carroll, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, Katherine Paterson,... Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Writing ElementsDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets: 3

TN.FL. FOUNDATIONAL LITERACY STANDARDS

4.FL.PWR. Phonics and Word Recognition

4.FL.PWR.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills when decoding isolated words and in connected text.
4.FL.PWR.3.a. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.
Root Words/Prefixes/SuffixesWhen the ending, or inflection, is taken away from a word, the word that remains is called the root word or base word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Decoding StrategiesDecoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Multiple MeaningWords with multiple meanings are words with more than one meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Root WordsWhat are Root Words? A root is the foundation on which the meaning of the word is built. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Roots/Prefixes/SuffixesWhat are Root Words, Prefixes, and Suffixes? A root word is a word with no prefixes or suffixes added to it. A root word is the basic element, the base, of a word. A prefix is added to the beginning of a root word to form a new word. A suffix is added to the ending of a root word to form a new word. Adding a prefix or suffix to a root word can change the meaning of that root word. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

4.FL.WC. Word Composition

4.FL.WC.4. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills when encoding words; write legibly.
4.FL.WC.4.a. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly consulting references as needed.
Syllables/Spelling PatternsWords can be divided into syllables. Spelling patterns include groups of letters. A spelling pattern is a group of letters that represents a sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

4.FL.SC. Sentence Composition

4.FL.SC.6. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when speaking and conventions of standard English grammar and usage, including capitalization and punctuation, when writing.
4.FL.SC.6.d. Form and use prepositional phrases.
Subject/Verb AgreementSubject/verb agreement and prepositional phrases. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.FL.SC.6.e. Produce complete sentences; recognize and correct inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
Complete & Incomplete SentencesStudents demonstrate an understanding of the structures of the English language. Read more...iWorksheets :4
GrammarSubject and verb agreement and other grammar skills. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.FL.SC.6.f. Use correct capitalization.
Capitalization/PunctuationDemonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
4.FL.SC.6.i. Write several cohesive paragraphs on a topic.
Coherent ParagraphsA paragraph is a group of sentences about one topic. The sentences are related to each other, and they make sense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Extraneous DetailsExtraneous details are details that are not necessary to include in a particular paragraph. They are details that are NOT related to the theme of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.FL.VA. Vocabulary Acquisition

FL.VA.7. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.
4.FL.VA.7a. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
4.FL.VA.7a.i. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
VocabularyWhat are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context CluesIdentify the meaning of unknown words by text surrounding word. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Decoding StrategiesDecoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context CluesContext cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context CluesThe five types of Context Clues are: Example Clues (group of items in a category), Synonym Clues (similar meaning is in the text), Antonym Clues (opposite meaning is in the text), Direct Definition Clues (meaning is stated in the sentence) and Appositive Clues (meaning is set off by commas). Read more...iWorksheets :3
VocabularyWhat is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
4.FL.VA.7a.ii. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word.
Word Meaning with Prefixes/SuffixesPrefixes are letters placed before a root word which change the meaning of the root word. Suffixes are letters placed after the root word which change the meaning of the root word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Prefix/Suffix/SyllablesA prefix is a group of letters placed before a root word or another prefix creating a new word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Decoding StrategiesDecoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Roots/Prefixes/SuffixesWhat are Root Words, Prefixes, and Suffixes? A root word is a word with no prefixes or suffixes added to it. A root word is the basic element, the base, of a word. A prefix is added to the beginning of a root word to form a new word. A suffix is added to the ending of a root word to form a new word. Adding a prefix or suffix to a root word can change the meaning of that root word. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
4.FL.VA.7a.iii. Consult reference materials, both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
Dictionary/Thesaurus/Parts of a BookAlphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Dictionary/ThesaurusAlphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of a BookFreeA book often has several parts that make finding information easier for readers. They are: title, introduction, body, conclusion, and back cover. Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :1
Parts of a BookBooks contain several informational and important parts, including: Table of Contents, Index and Glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.FL.VA.7b. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
4.FL.VA.7b.i. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
Literary ElementsAuthors use literary elements to make their writing more exciting. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary DevicesWhat is Onomatopoeia? Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like the word it is describing. What is a Hyperbole? Hyperbole is an exaggerated comparison. What is a Simile? Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Literary DevicesLiterary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her messages in a simple manner to the readers. Literary Devices are Metaphor, Simile, Hyperbole, Personification, Analogy, Euphemism, Allegory etc... Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.FL.VA.7b.iii. Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites and to words with similar but not identical meanings
VocabularyWhat are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Synonyms/AntonymsAn antonym is a word that means the opposite of another word. For example "up" is an antonym of "down". Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning. Synonyms for "Intelligent" are "smart" and "clever". Read more...iWorksheets :3
SynonymsWhat are synonyms? Synonyms are words that mean the same, or nearly the same, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
AntonymsFreeAntonyms are words that mean the opposite, or nearly the opposite, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Synonyms/AntonymsWhat are Synonyms? Synonyms are words that have nearly the same meaning. What are Antonyms? Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
VocabularyWhat is Vocabulary? Vocabulary is a list, collection, or group of words that are known by someone. Your vocabulary is all the words you know how to pronounce, what they mean, and how to use them in a sentence too. Your vocabulary includes many kinds of words such as adjectives, adverbs, synonyms, antonyms, and even homographs. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
4.FL.VA.7c. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being and that are basic to a particular topic.
Content VocabularySpelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Content Area VocabularyDetermine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to grade 4 topic or subject area. Read more...iWorksheets :3

TN.RL. READING STANDARDS - LITERATURE

4.RL.KID. Key Ideas and Details

R.KID.1. Read closely to determine what a text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
4.RL.KID.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/EvaluativeMaking inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Predictions, Conclusions and InferencesDrawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
InferenceWhat is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing InferencesWhat are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsA conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Implied InformationDraw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.KID.2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
4.RL.KID.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
Main IdeaThe main idea is the overall theme of a paragraph or section of a text. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SummarizingWhen you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.KID.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
4.RL.KID.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Elements of FictionA character is a person in a story, novel, or play. <br> The setting in a story is where the story takes place.<br> The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning. <br>All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsIdentify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.RL.CS. Craft and Structure

R.CS.4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
4.RL.CS.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that refer to significant characters and situations found in literature and history.
Elements of FictionA character is a person in a story, novel, or play. <br> The setting in a story is where the story takes place.<br> The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning. <br>All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsIdentify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.CS.5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of a text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
4.RL.CS.5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and stories, and refer to the structural elements when writing or speaking about a text.
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GenreHistorical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
GenreA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.RL.IKI. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

R.IKI.9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches an author takes.
4.RL.IKI.9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes, topics, and patterns of events in stories from different cultures.
Elements of FictionA character is a person in a story, novel, or play. <br> The setting in a story is where the story takes place.<br> The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning. <br>All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Main IdeaThe main idea is the overall theme of a paragraph or section of a text. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plot FeaturesA plot is the sequence of events that make up a story: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution/Denoument. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary ElementsIdentify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.RL.RRTC. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

R.RRTC.10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
4.RL.RRTC.10. Read and comprehend stories and poems throughout the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding at the high end as needed.
GenreHistorical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
GenreA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3

TN.RI. READING STANDARDS – INFORMATIONAL TEXT

4.RI.KID. Key Ideas and Details

R.KID.1. Read closely to determine what a text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
4.RI.KID.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in the text when drawing inferences from the text.
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literal/Inferential/EvaluativeMaking inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Predictions, Conclusions and InferencesDrawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
InferenceWhat is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Drawing InferencesWhat are Drawing Inferences? Drawing an inference is the act of drawing a logical conclusion based on the facts written in a text, a reader’s background knowledge, and a reader’s personal information. When reading, you can use clues in the story AND your experiences to make an inference about what you think is going on in a story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Drawing ConclusionsA conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Implied InformationDraw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved. Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.KID.2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
4.RI.KID.2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize a text.
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
SummarizeWhen you summarize you put the main idea of the text into your own words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
SummarizingWhen you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.KID.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
4.RI.KID.3. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in a text.
Content VocabularySpelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Written DirectionsRead and understand written directions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GenreHistorical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre CharacteristicsA genre is a particular type of literature: Poetry, Drama, Letters, Advertisements, Historical Fiction, Biographies, Autobiographies. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
GenreA literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.RI.CS. Craft and Structure

R.CS.4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
4.RI.CS.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
Content VocabularySpelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Content Area VocabularyDetermine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to grade 4 topic or subject area. Read more...iWorksheets :3
R.CS.5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of a text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
4.RI.CS.5. Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
Central Idea/Supporting DetailsFreeIdentify central idea and supporting details. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.RI.IKI. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

R.IKI.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
4.RI.IKI.7. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
Charts/Maps/Graphic OrganizersFreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Graphic OrganizersA graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text FeaturesThe title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Text FeaturesWhat are Text Features? A text that you are reading may include a map, chart, or graph. These are features of the text that help you understand the information in the text more clearly. You may also see a map, chart, or graph by itself too. E.g., you may see a map in a park, which you can read to help figure out where you need to go. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Interpret InformationWhat is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
R.IKI.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
4.RI.IKI.8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
Main IdeaThe main idea of a text is what the text is written about. The main idea of a paragraph, story, article, or other written text is the main theme, subject, or topic of that writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingA literary theme is the main idea a writer explores in a story or other literary work. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of WritingDetermine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3

TN.W. WRITING STANDARDS

4.W.TTP. Text Types and Protocol

W.TTP.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
4.W.TTP.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
4.W.TTP.1.b. Develop an opinion with reasons that are supported by facts and details.
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
W.TTP.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
4.W.TTP.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
4.W.TTP.2.b. Group related information in paragraphs and sections.
Coherent ParagraphsA paragraph is a group of sentences about one topic. The sentences are related to each other, and they make sense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Extraneous DetailsExtraneous details are details that are not necessary to include in a particular paragraph. They are details that are NOT related to the theme of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
4.W.TTP.2.d. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
4.W.TTP.2.e. Provide a conclusion related to the information or explanation presented.
Supporting/Concluding SentencesSupporting sentences support the main idea of the paragraph. These sentences follow a topic sentence in a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
4.W.TTP.2.f. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases.
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
W.TTP.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
4.W.TTP.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.
4.W.TTP.3.c. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.W.TTP.3.d. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
4.W.TTP.3.e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Supporting/Concluding SentencesSupporting sentences support the main idea of the paragraph. These sentences follow a topic sentence in a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.W.PDW. Production and Distribution of Writing

W.PDW.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
4.W.PDW.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.W.RBPK. Research to Build and Present Knowledge

W.RBPK.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focus questions, demonstrating new understanding of the subject under investigation.
4.W.RBPK.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
W.RBPK.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
4.W.RBPK.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade 4 standards for reading.
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting DetailA supporting detail is a detail that tells a specific fact or detail about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in WritingA topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting DetailsSupporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting DetailsMain idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative QuestionsLiteral questions have responses that are directly stated in the text. Evaluative questions require the reader to formulate a response based on their opinion. Answering inferential questions requires readers to search for context clues. The answer may also come from evidence and reasoning and not from an explicit statement in the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Topic SentencesA topic sentence is an introduction to a paragraph. It summarizes what the paragraph is written about. A topic sentence expresses the main idea of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Simple/Compound/Complex SentencesIdentify Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences. Create a Compound sentence from two simple sentences. Identify clauses in the compound sentence. Finish the sentences. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.W.RW. Range of Writing

W.RW.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
4.W.RW.10. Write routinely over extended time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences; promote writing fluency.
Writing/Listening/Speaking RulesStudents read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world.<br>Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.<br>Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purpose for WritingPurpose for writing (to explain, describe, narrate, persuade or express feelings). Read more...iWorksheets :3
Standards

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