Nebraska Core Academic Content Standards for Second Grade English Language Arts

Abbreviations
An abbreviation is a shortened form of a longer word. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Beginning, Middle, and End
Why Do We Need to Learn about Beginning, Middle and End? When you read a good story, you enjoy it if it was written well. To write well, you should follow the rules of beginning, middle, and end to make it a good story. The writing process helps you have a good beginning, middle, and end. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Challenge Words
What are some of the most difficult words a second grader must learn to spell? Here are some words you should know how to spell and some hints to help you remember. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Complete & Incomplete Sentences
FreeA complete sentence begins with a capital, ends with punctuation, and makes sense. Any sentence that does not begin with a capital, end with correct punctuation, or make sense is incomplete. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Frequently Misspelled Words
Words that are often misspelled and some hints to help you spell them. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
High Frequency Words I
What are High Frequency Words? High frequency words are the sight words you need to know instantly. You do not need to sound them out or look them up in a dictionary. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
High Frequency Words II
High frequency words are the words you need to recognize instantly. You do not have to figure them out, sound them out, or look them up in a dictionary. You just need to know them instantly. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Main Idea
What is a Main Idea in a Visual Message? Pictures and actions send messages without words. Here are some you should know. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Mathematics Vocabulary
Words associated with addition, subtraction, comparing, money, fractions, and geometry. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Parts of a Book
Books have special parts to help you find information easily. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Past Tense (-ed)
Past tense means something happened in the past. It could be many years ago, yesterday, or just a few minutes ago. Verbs change in special ways to show past tense. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Plural Nouns
What are plurals? Plurals are the words that change a noun to mean more than one. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Proper Nouns
A proper noun is a special name for a particular person, place, or thing. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. If there is more than one word for a particular person, place, or thing, then the first, last, and all important words are capitalized. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
R Controlled Vowels
We know that the vowels a, e, i, o, and u can have a short or long sound. But when a vowel is followed by the letter r its sounds changes. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Rhyming Words
To rhyme, words must have the same vowel sound and the same ending sounds. Read more...iWorksheets: 5Study Guides: 1
Root Words
What are Root Words? Root words are sometimes called base words. A root word is the smallest form of a word before it has anything added to it. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Science Vocabulary
Spelling and vocabulary words for second grade science Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Sight Words I
Appropriate words for spelling and definitions for 2nd graders Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Sight Words II
Sight words are the words a second grader should be able to recognize instantly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Sight Words III
Sight words are words a second grader should be able to read quickly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Sight Words IV
What are sight words? Sight words are the words every second grader should be able to read quickly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Social Studies Vocabulary
Spelling and vocabulary words for Grade Two Social Studies. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Verbs
A verb is a word that shows action or state of being. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Word Families
What is a Word Family? A word family is a group of words (or syllables) that all have the same vowel and ending sound. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Words with /k/
What are the sounds of k? The letter k is the sound you hear when you say kiss, kid, and kind. Many words begin or end with the letter k. But the sound of /k/ is written in some different ways. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Words with Ending Blends
FreeWhat are some important ending blends?
If you know the following blends, it will help you spell and pronounce many words correctly. Practice saying these words aloud. Listen for the ending blends. Read more...
iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

NE.LA 2.1. Reading: Students will learn and apply reading skills and strategies to comprehend text.

LA 2.1.3. Word Analysis: Students will use phonetic analysis to read and write grade-level text.

LA 2.1.3.a. Know and apply letter/sound correspondence and spelling patterns (e.g., consonant and vowel digraphs, diphthongs) when reading, writing, and spelling grade-level text.
Long/Short Vowels
What is meant by long or short vowels? Long vowels are the vowels that say their own names. Short vowel sounds do not say their names. Here’s a rule to help you know when to make a short vowel sound: A vowel is usually short if it comes at the beginning of a word or between two consonants and is the only vowel in the word or syllable. A vowel is usually long if two vowels are in the word or syllable. The first vowel is long and the second is silent. Remember when two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Beginning Digraphs
Many words begin with a digraph. That means two letters come together and make a brand new sound. You cannot sound out the word by using each letter’s sound because they have changed into a new sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vowel Diphthongs
Vowel diphthongs are vowel letters whose sounds blend smoothly together. The same sounds can be spelled using different letters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Long and Short Vowel Discrimination
A vowel is long when it says its own name. In a dictionary or glossary it will have a straight line over it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vowel Digraphs
Vowels are a, e, u, o, u, and sometimes y or w. When 2 vowels come together in a word that is a vowel digraph. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Consonant Blends and Digraphs
What is a Consonant Blend? When two consonants come together in a word but still make their own sounds, we call that a blend. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Short Vowel Discrimination
Discriminating between short vowel sounds with one syllable words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Spelling
FreeSpelling three or four letter words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Continuous Action (-ing)
How do you add the ING suffix to verbs? We add -ing to many verbs. But to spell them correctly, you need to remember the rules. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Consonant Blends
What are Consonant Blends? Consonant blends are two or more letters that work together. When a word is sounded out, both of the letters in a consonant blend are heard. For example, in the word small, the s and the m are blended together in sounding the sm. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Words with Initial Blends
A blend means two letters are read together to make a smooth sound. Each one still makes its own sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ending Digraphs
Spelling is easy when you recognize special digraphs. Here are some words you should know that end with digraphs. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Short Vowel Sound
What is a Short Vowel? The vowels are the letters, a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y. Vowels make special sounds in words. They make a sound we call short. Look at these words. They all have the short vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
oo Vowel Sound
What are the words with a double o sound as in moon? When you see oo together in a word, it usually has the sound you hear in “Moo” so put oo in when you spell them. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.3.b. Use word structure to read text (e.g., prefixes/suffixes, compound words, contractions, syllabication, derivation).
Word Meaning with Prefixes/Suffixes
Prefixes are letters placed before a root word which change the meaning of the root word. Suffixes are letters placed after the root word which change the meaning of the root word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Suffixes
A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Prefixes
A prefix is any letter or group of letters Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Syllables
What are Syllables? Syllables are parts of words. Each part of a word has one vowel sound in it. Be careful! You may see more than one vowel letter, but still hear only one vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Contractions
What are Contractions? A contraction is a special word made by putting together a verb and another word. Every contraction has an apostrophe to show where letters are missing from the original two words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Contractions
What is a Contraction? A contraction is really two words squeezed together to make a new word. Some of the letters from one or both of the words go away and a special mark called an apostrophe goes in their place. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

LA 2.1.5. Vocabulary: Students will build and use conversational, academic, and content-specific grade-level vocabulary.

LA 2.1.5.a. Use word structure elements, known words, and word patterns to determine meaning (e.g., contractions, plurals, possessives, basic parts of speech, compounds, syllables).
Nouns
Noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance, or quality Read more...iWorksheets :3
Verb Endings
Verbs may change their spelling according to which tense is being used. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Plurals
Regular and irregular plural nouns. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Syllables
What are Syllables? Syllables are parts of words. Each part of a word has one vowel sound in it. Be careful! You may see more than one vowel letter, but still hear only one vowel sound. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Contractions
What are Contractions? A contraction is a special word made by putting together a verb and another word. Every contraction has an apostrophe to show where letters are missing from the original two words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Plural Ending -es
Plural endings adding -es for words ending in sh, ch, x, and z. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Nouns
What are Nouns? Nouns are words used to identify ideas, actions, qualities, persons, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Compound Words
What are Compound Words? Any word made up of two small words is a compound word. Examples: foot + ball = football. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Compound Words
What is a Compound Word? A Compound Word is a word that is composed of two or more separate words. Examples: sea + shell = seashell, basket + ball = basketball. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Contractions
What is a Contraction? A contraction is really two words squeezed together to make a new word. Some of the letters from one or both of the words go away and a special mark called an apostrophe goes in their place. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.5.b. Identify and use context clues (e.g., word and sentence clues) and text features to help infer meaning of unknown words.
Context Clues
Identify the meaning of unknown words by text surrounding word. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.5.c. Acquire new academic and content-specific grade-level vocabulary, relate to prior knowledge, and apply in new situations.
Content Vocabulary
Spelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
LA 2.1.5.d. Identify semantic relationships (e.g., conceptual categories, synonyms, antonyms, multiple meanings) to determine the meaning of words, aid in comprehension, and improve writing.
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Double Negatives and Homophones
Homophones are words that sound the same, but have different spellings and different meanings. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Synonyms
What are synonyms? Synonyms are words that mean the same, or nearly the same, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Antonyms
FreeAntonyms are words that mean the opposite, or nearly the opposite, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Homophones
What are Homophones? Homophones are words that sound exactly alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are sometimes called homonyms. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.5.e. Locate words and determine meaning using reference materials.
Dictionary/Thesaurus/Parts of a Book
Alphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary. Read more...iWorksheets :3

LA 2.1.6. Comprehension: Students will construct meaning by using prior knowledge and text information while reading grade-level literary and informational text.

LA 2.1.6.a. Identify author’s purpose(s) (e.g., explain, entertain, inform, persuade) to support text comprehension.
Author's Purpose
the author's purpose is the reason that he or she had for writing the text. Some authors' purposes are to inform, entertain or persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.b. Identify elements of literary text (e.g., characters, setting, plot).
Settings
What are Settings? Settings are places.
Schools, homes, a zoo, a street, a town or city are all settings.
Try this! Find a setting: a] girl b] horse c] house d] mouse Read more...
iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.d. Retell major events and key details from a literary text and/or media and support a prompted theme.
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.e. Retell main ideas and supporting details from informational text and/or media.
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Main Idea
A main idea is the most important part of a sentence or story. It tells you what it's all about. When you write or read, you keep the main idea in mind. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.g. Compare and contrast the basic characteristics of a variety of literary and informational texts.
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.i. Construct and/or answer literal and inferential questions and support answers with specific evidence from the text or additional sources.
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
LA 2.1.6.n. Make predictions and inferences about a text before, during, and after reading literary, informational, digital text, and/or media.
Predictions
A prediction is what you think will happen next. You do not just guess. You use clues in the picture to decide what will happen next. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Predicting Endings
What Does it Mean to Predict Endings? When you read, you try to make sense of what you are reading. When you write, you need to make sense in what you are writing. When you predict an ending, you try to think of the most sensible way for the story to end. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.1.6.o. Demonstrate an understanding of text via multiple mediums (e.g., writing, artistic representation, video, other media).
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3

NE.LA 2.2. Writing: Students will learn and apply writing skills and strategies to communicate.

LA 2.2.1. Writing Process: Students will apply the writing process to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing using correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, and other conventions of standard English appropriate for grade-level.

LA 2.2.1.a. Use prewriting activities and inquiry tools to generate ideas.
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
LA 2.2.1.d. Compose paragraphs with grammatically correct sentences of varying length, complexity, and type.
Coherent Paragraphs
A paragraph is a group of sentences about one topic. The sentences are related to each other, and they make sense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Unnecessary Information
What is unnecessary information? When you write a paragraph, story, or report you must include all important information. Sometimes writers put in too much information. It is important to know what to include ad what to leave out. The unnecessary information is any part that does not belong. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
LA 2.2.1.e. Revise to improve and clarify writing through self-monitoring strategies and feedback from others.
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
LA 2.2.1.h. Proofread and edit writing recursively for format and conventions of standard English (e.g., spelling, capitalization, grammar, punctuation, syntax, semantics).
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Standards

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