Maryland Standards for Third Grade English Language Arts

Adjectives/Adverbs/Vivid Language
What is an Adjective? An adjective is a word that describes a noun. When an adjective is added to a noun, the sentence becomes more interesting. Read more...iWorksheets: 7Study Guides: 1
Antonyms
FreeAntonyms are words that mean the opposite, or nearly the opposite, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Author/Title of Well Known Literature
Authors and titles of well known literature as well as other background knowledge. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Cause/Effect
An action that results in something else happening is called the cause. The result of an action is called the effect. In real-life order, the cause happens first. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
Combining Sentences
Write correctly complete sentences of statement, command, question, or exclamation, with final punctuation. Declarative, Imperative and Exclamatory. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Complete & Incomplete Sentences
Students demonstrate an understanding of the structures of the English language Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Consonant Blends
What are Consonant Blends? Consonant blends are two or more letters that work together. When a word is sounded out, both of the letters in a consonant blend are heard. For example, in the word small, the s and the m are blended together in sounding the sm. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Grammar Skills
Subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Multiple Meaning
Words with multiple meanings are words with more than one meaning. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Phonics
Phonics is a method of teaching people to read by correlating sounds with symbols in an alphabetic writing system. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Problem/Solution
The problem of a story is the trouble or difficulty in which the main character of a story find himself or herself.
The solution of a story is the way that the character or characters in the story figure out or solve the problem of the story. Read more...
iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
R Controlled Vowels
R-controlled vowels are vowels in which the r following the vowel changes the sound of the vowel. Sometimes, we call the r a bossy letter because it takes over and bosses the vowels around! Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Root Words/Prefixes/Suffixes
When the ending, or inflection, is taken away from a word, the word that remains is called the root word or base word. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
Rules for Writing
Combining two simple sentences. Read more...iWorksheets: 7Study Guides: 1
Sequential Order
Sequential order is the order in which events really happened---real-life order Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Subject and Predicate
The subject of a sentence is who or what the sentence is about. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Syllable Patterns/Word Families
Word families are groups of words that have a common feature or pattern. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Synonyms
What are synonyms? Synonyms are words that mean the same, or nearly the same, as other words. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Topic Sentence
The topic of a paragraph is the word or words that tell what the paragraph is about. The topic should be related to all of the sentences in the paragraph. Being able to pick out the topic of the paragraph helps the reader to understand the meaning of the paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Vowel Diphthongs
Vowel diphthongs are vowel letters whose sounds blend smoothly together. The same sounds can be spelled using different letters. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1

MD.1.0. General Reading Processes

1.B. Students will apply their knowledge of letter/sound relationships and word structure to decode unfamiliar words.

1.B.2. Decode words in grade-level texts
1.B.2.3.c. Use word meanings and order in sentences to confirm decoding efforts
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context Clues
Identify the meaning of unknown words by text surrounding word. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context Clues
Context cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

1.C. Students will read orally with accuracy and expression at a rate that sounds like speech.

1.C.2. Read grade-level text accurately
1.C.2.c. Use word context clues, sentence structure, and visual clues to guide self-correction
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context Clues
Identify the meaning of unknown words by text surrounding word. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Context Clues
Context cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.C.2.d. Increase sight words read fluently
High Frequency Words I
High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
High frequency words are words that you may come across often when reading. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Sight Words II
Sight words are the words a second grader should be able to recognize instantly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words I
What are High Frequency Words? High frequency words are the sight words you need to know instantly. You do not need to sound them out or look them up in a dictionary. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
High frequency words are the words you need to recognize instantly. You do not have to figure them out, sound them out, or look them up in a dictionary. You just need to know them instantly. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sight Words IV
What are sight words? Sight words are the words every second grader should be able to read quickly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sight Words III
Sight words are words a second grader should be able to read quickly and spell easily. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Mathematics Vocabulary
Words associated with addition, subtraction, comparing, money, fractions, and geometry. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Sight Words I
Appropriate words for spelling and definitions for 2nd graders Read more...iWorksheets :3
Frequently Misspelled Words
Words that are often misspelled and some hints to help you spell them. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words II
High frequency words are those words that a third grader should be able to read quickly, without sounding them out. They appear often in stories and books read by third graders. High frequency words are also known as sight words. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
High Frequency Words I
High frequency words are those words that a third grader should be able to read quickly, without sounding them out. They appear often in stories and books read by third graders. High frequency words are also known as sight words. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
1.C.3. Read grade-level text with expression
1.C.3.a. Demonstrate appropriate use of phrasing
1.C.3.a.2. Use punctuation cues to guide meaning and expression
Coherent Paragraphs
A paragraph is a group of sentences about one topic. The sentences are related to each other, and they make sense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.C.3.a.3. Use pacing and intonation to convey meaning and expression
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.C.3.a.4. Adjust intonation and pitch appropriately to convey meaning and expression
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

1.D. Students will use a variety of strategies and opportunities to understand word meaning and to increase vocabulary.

1.D.2. Develop a conceptual understanding of new words
1.D.2.b. Identify and explain word relationships to determine the meanings of words
Challenge Words
What are some of the most difficult words a second grader must learn to spell? Here are some words you should know how to spell and some hints to help you remember. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.D.3. Understand, acquire, and use new vocabulary
1.D.3.a. Use context to determine the meanings of words
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vocabulary
What are Adjectives, Adverbs, Antonyms, Synonyms, and Homographs? An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun. An adverb can tell you how, where, or when something is done. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of each other. Synonyms are words that have almost the same meaning. Homographs are words that have more than one definition. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Context Clues
Identify the meaning of unknown words by text surrounding word. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Context Clues
Context cluesare hints found in a text that may help to figure out the meaning of a difficult word. A context clue might be in the same sentence, the sentence before, or the sentence after the difficult word. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Context Clues
What are Context Clues? When you are reading, you will come to words you do not know. You can learn the meaning of those words by looking for the clues in the sentence around that word. The clues will help you understand the meaning of the new word even if you cannot pronounce it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.D.3.c. Use resources to determine the meanings of words
Dictionary/Thesaurus/Parts of a Book
Alphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Dictionary/Thesaurus
Alphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.D.3.d. Use new vocabulary in speaking and writing to gain and extend content knowledge and clarify expression

1.E. Students will use a variety of strategies to understand what they read (construct meaning).

1.E.2. Use strategies to prepare for reading (before reading)
1.E.2.a. Survey and preview the text by examining features such as the title, pictures, illustrations, photographs, charts, and graphs
Maps, Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Charts/Maps/Graphic Organizers
FreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.2.c. Make predictions and ask questions about the text
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Predicting Endings
What Does it Mean to Predict Endings? When you read, you try to make sense of what you are reading. When you write, you need to make sense in what you are writing. When you predict an ending, you try to think of the most sensible way for the story to end. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3. Use strategies to make meaning from text (during reading)
1.E.3.d. Look back through the text to search for connections between and among ideas
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.e. Make, confirm, or adjust predictions
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Predicting Endings
What Does it Mean to Predict Endings? When you read, you try to make sense of what you are reading. When you write, you need to make sense in what you are writing. When you predict an ending, you try to think of the most sensible way for the story to end. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.3.f. Periodically summarize while reading
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4. Use strategies to demonstrate understanding of the text (after reading)
1.E.4.a. Identify and explain the main idea
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.b. Identify and explain what is directly stated in the text
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.c. Identify and explain what is not directly stated in the text by drawing inferences
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.d. Draw conclusions based on the text and prior knowledge
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.e. Confirm, refute, or make predictions and form new ideas
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Predicting Endings
What Does it Mean to Predict Endings? When you read, you try to make sense of what you are reading. When you write, you need to make sense in what you are writing. When you predict an ending, you try to think of the most sensible way for the story to end. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
1.E.4.f. Paraphrase the main idea
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
1.E.4.g. Summarize
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.2.0. Comprehension of Informational Text

2.A.1. Develop comprehension skills by reading a variety of self-selected and assigned print and non-print informational texts, including electronic media

2.A.1.a. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of nonfiction materials such as textbooks, appropriate reference materials, personal narratives, diaries, and journals, biographies, newspapers, letters, articles, web sites and other online materials, other appropriate content-specific texts to gain information and content knowledge
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.1.b. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of functional documents such as sets of directions, science investigations, atlases, posters, flyers, forms, instructional manuals, menus, pamphlets, rules, invitations, recipes, advertisements, other functional documents
Maps, Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Content Vocabulary
Spelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Written Directions
Read and understand written directions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Charts/Maps/Graphic Organizers
FreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Science Vocabulary
Spelling and vocabulary words for second grade science Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.2. Identify and use text features to facilitate understanding of informational texts

2.A.2.a. Use print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, and underlining
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.2.b. Use graphic aids such as illustrations and pictures, photographs, drawings, sketches, cartoons, maps (key, scale, legend), graphs, charts/tables, and diagrams
Maps, Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text Read more...iWorksheets :3
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Charts/Maps/Graphic Organizers
FreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea
What is a Main Idea in a Visual Message? Pictures and actions send messages without words. Here are some you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.2.c. Use informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, pronunciation key, transition words, boxed text
Maps, Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Written Directions
Read and understand written directions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Charts/Maps/Graphic Organizers
FreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Write labels and captions for graphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.2.d. Use organizational aids such as titles, chapter titles, headings, subheadings, tables of contents, numbered steps, glossaries, indices, transition words
Parts of a Book
Books have special parts to help you find information easily. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Written Directions
Read and understand written directions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Dictionary/Thesaurus/Parts of a Book
Alphabetical order, table of contents, title, author, index, glossary. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Parts of a Book
FreeA book often has several parts that make finding information easier for readers. Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :1
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.2.f. Identify and explain the contributions of text features to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

2.A.3. Develop knowledge of organizational structure of informational text to understand what is read

2.A.3.a. Identify and analyze the organization of texts such as sequential and/or chronological order, main idea and supporting details, cause/effect, and problem solution
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3

2.A.4. Determine important ideas and messages in informational texts

2.A.4.a. Identify and explain the author's/text's purpose and intended audience
Author's Purpose
the author's purpose is the reason that he or she had for writing the text. Some authors' purposes are to inform, entertain or persuade. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
2.A.4.c. State and support main ideas and messages
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.d. Summarize or paraphrase
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.e. Identify and explain information not related to the main idea
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.4.g. Draw conclusions and inferences and make generalizations and predictions from text
Drawing Conclusions
FreeAnswering questions to demonstrate comprehension by drawing conclusions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literal/Inferential/Evaluative
Making inferences is determining facts and meaning that the author does not directly state. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Precictions/Conclusions/Inferences
Drawing a conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on facts and details in a sentence, paragraph, story, or article. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Predicting Endings
What Does it Mean to Predict Endings? When you read, you try to make sense of what you are reading. When you write, you need to make sense in what you are writing. When you predict an ending, you try to think of the most sensible way for the story to end. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Inference
What is an Inference? An inference is a Reading skill. When the reader puts together his or her life experiences with the words of the author, he or she is using inferencing skills. A student who uses inferencing skills can read between the lines to figure out what the author means. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Predictions
What are Predictions? When predicting you use facts and clues from the reading as well as your own personal knowledge to help you make a good guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2.A.4.h. Distinguish between a fact and an opinion
Fact/Fiction/Opinion
A fact can be proven. An opinion is the way that someone feels about a subject and it cannot be proven. Being able to tell the difference between a fact and an opinion will improve your reading comprehension. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Cause/Effect, Fact/Opinion
What is Cause & Effect? A cause always has an effect. There is a reason why something happens. An effect happens as a result of a cause. Something happens for a reason. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

2.A.5. Identify and explain the author's use of language

2.A.5.a. Identify and explain specific words or phrases that contribute to the meaning of a text
Content Vocabulary
Spelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Content Area Vocabulary
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to grade 4 topic or subject area. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.5.c. Identify and explain the effect of repetition of words and phrases
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Content Vocabulary
Spelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Poetic Devices
Students use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Content Area Vocabulary
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to grade 4 topic or subject area. Read more...iWorksheets :3

2.A.6. Read critically to evaluate informational text

2.A.6.b. Identify and explain additions or changes to format or features that would make the text easier to understand
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
2.A.6.e. Identify and explain information not included in the text
Supporting Details
Supporting details support the main idea of a text. Supporting details tell you more about the main idea of the text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Main Idea/Supporting Details
Main idea, supporting details, and irrelevant details. Read more...iWorksheets :3
2.A.6.f. Identify and explain words and other techniques that affect the reader's feelings
Content Vocabulary
Spelling in content areas including Math, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Art, and Music. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Content Area Vocabulary
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to grade 4 topic or subject area. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.3.0. Comprehension of Literary Text

3.A.2. Use text features to facilitate understanding of literary texts

3.A.2.b. Identify and explain how graphic aids such as pictures and illustrations, punctuation, print features contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
3.A.2.c. Identify and explain how informational aids such as introductions and overviews, materials lists, timelines, captions, glossed words, labels, numbered steps, bulleted lists, footnoted words, pronunciation keys, transition words, end notes, works cited, other information aids encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Maps, Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Inferences
Inferring is the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is believed to follow from that of the former. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Written Directions
Read and understand written directions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Charts/Maps/Graphic Organizers
FreeMaps, charts, graphs, and diagrams are graphics that contain information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Graphic Organizers
A graphic organizer is a visual display that demonstrates relationships between facts, concepts or ideas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Finding Information
How do Charts and Illustrations Help You? Charts and illustrations are special tools to help you find information easily. They are arranged in a way that puts all the information together so that it is clear and easy to read. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Labels/Captions for Graphics
Write labels and captions for graphics. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Interpret Information
What is Interpreting Information? You can use maps, charts, and timelines to interpret information. Charts are visual displays of information. They reveal information through mathematical statistics. A timeline is used to show events in chronological order. A map is a drawing created to represent the world or a part of the world's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3.A.2.d. Identify and explain how print features such as large bold print, font size/type, italics, colored print, quotation marks, underlining, other print features encountered in informational texts contribute to meaning
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Text Features
The title of an article is called a headline. A headline usually tells the main idea of what the article is about. Headlines often grab your attention and make you want to read the article. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

3.A.3. Use elements of narrative texts to facilitate understanding

3.A.3.a. Identify and distinguish among types of narrative texts such as characteristics of the general categories of fiction versus nonfiction, realistic fiction, tall tales, legends, fables, fairy tales, biographies
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.3.c. Identify and describe the setting and the mood
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.3.d. Identify and analyze the characters
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.3.e. Identify and explain relationships between and among characters, setting, and events
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

3.A.4. Use elements of poetry to facilitate understanding

3.A.4.a. Use structural features such as structure and form including lines and stanzas, shape, refrain, chorus, and rhyme scheme to identify poetry as a literary form
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.b. Identify and explain the meaning of words, lines, and stanzas
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.c. Identify and explain sound elements of poetry
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Literary Devices
Literary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her messages in a simple manner to the readers. Literary Devices are Metaphor, Simile, Hyperbole, Personification, Analogy, Euphemism, Allegory etc... Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.4.d. Identify and explain other poetic elements such as setting, mood, tone, etc., that contribute to meaning
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Genre
Historical fiction, Science fiction, biography, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, and poetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content. The five major genres in literature are: Poetry, Drama, Prose, Fiction, Non-Fiction. Genres are often divided into subgenres. Read more...iWorksheets :3

3.A.5. Use elements of drama to facilitate understanding

3.A.5.a. Use structural features to identify a play as a literary form
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
3.A.5.b. Identify and explain the action of a scene
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.5.c. Identify and explain stage directions that help to create character and movement
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
3.A.5.d. Identify and explain stage directions and dialogue that help to create character
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
Literary genre is the grownup way of saying different kinds of writing. The word genre is pronounced zhan rah. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

3.A.6. Determine important ideas and messages in literary texts

3.A.6.b. Identify and explain a similar idea or theme in more than one text
Main Idea
The main idea is the overall theme of a paragraph or section of a text. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.6.d. Summarize
Summarizing
When you summarize you take a large selection of text and condense it to just the main facts or ideas. A summary is significantly shorter than the actual text. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3.A.7. Identify and describe the author's use of language

3.A.7.d. Identify and explain figurative language
Literary Devices
Literary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her messages in a simple manner to the readers. Literary Devices are Metaphor, Simile, Hyperbole, Personification, Analogy, Euphemism, Allegory etc... Read more...iWorksheets :3
3.A.7.f. Identify and explain repetition and exaggeration
Literary Genres
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or length. Read more...iWorksheets :4
Poetic Devices
Students use the reading process to demonstrate understanding of literary and informational texts. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

3.A.8. Read critically to evaluate literary texts

3.A.8.a. Identify and explain the believability of the characters' actions and the story's events
Elements of Fiction
A character is a person in a story, novel, or play.
The setting in a story is where the story takes place.
The plot of a story is what goes on in the story. It's a series of events that gives story a meaning.
All of the above are elements of a fiction. Read more...
iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Literary Elements
Identify and interpret plot, character, setting, events, character motivations and actions. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Theme of Writing
Recognize theme or message of writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Story Elements
What are the Elements of a Story? Story elements are plot, setting, and characters. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

MD.4.0. Writing

4.A.1. Compose texts using the prewriting and drafting strategies of effective writers and speakers

4.A.1.a. Generate topics based on discussion of common experiences using techniques such as graphic organizers, journal writing, listing, webbing, and discussion of prior experiences
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.1.b. Plan and organize ideas for writing by using an appropriate organizational structure such as chronological or sequential order, comparison and contrast
4.A.1.b.1. Complete an idea by providing topic, support, and concluding sentences
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.A.2. Compose oral, written, and visual presentations that express personal ideas, inform, and persuade

4.A.2.a. Compose to express personal ideas to develop fluency using a variety of forms such as journals, narratives, letters, reports, and paragraphs
Coherent Paragraphs
A paragraph is a group of sentences about one topic. The sentences are related to each other, and they make sense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Friendly Letter
There are five parts in a friendly letter. The parts of a friendly letter are the heading, the greeting, the body, the closing, and the signature. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Extraneous Details
Extraneous details are details that are not necessary to include in a particular paragraph. They are details that are NOT related to the theme of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Unnecessary Information
What is unnecessary information? When you write a paragraph, story, or report you must include all important information. Sometimes writers put in too much information. It is important to know what to include ad what to leave out. The unnecessary information is any part that does not belong. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
4.A.2.d. Compose to persuade using significant reasons and relevant support
4.A.2.d.1. Agree or disagree with an idea and generate convincing reasons with relevant support
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.A.3. Compose texts using the revising and editing strategies of effective writers and speakers

4.A.3.a. Revise texts for clarity, completeness, and effectiveness
4.A.3.a.1. Eliminate words and ideas that do not support the main idea
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4.A.3.a.3. Clarify meaning by rearranging sentences within a text for a clear beginning, middle, and end
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3

4.A.4. Identify how language choices in writing and speaking affect thoughts and feelings

4.A.4.a. Select words appropriate for audience, situation, or purpose
4.A.4.b. Acquire and use new vocabulary
4.A.4.c. Consider the effect of word choices on the audience

4.A.5. Assess the effectiveness of choice of details, word choice, and use of figurative language in the student's own composing

4.A.5.b. Explain how specific words/phrases used by the writer affects reader response
4.A.5.c. Examine and use basic transitions such as ''and,'' ''but,'' ''or,'' ''first,'' ''second,'' and ''last''
Writing Elements
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Vivid Language in Writing
A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4.A.6. Explain how textual changes in a work clarify meaning or fulfill a purpose

4.A.6.a. Revise own text for word choice
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3

MD.5.0. Controlling Language

5.A.1. Recognize elements of grammar in personal and academic reading

Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.A.2. Recognize, recall, and use basic elements of grammar to express ideas clearly

5.A.2.a. Identify and use parts of speech such as nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives (including articles)
Nouns
Noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance, or quality Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.A.2.b. Identify and incorporate subjects and verbs when composing simple sentences
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Verbs
A verb is a word that shows action or state of being. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.A.2.d. Identify and use verb forms such as singular/ plural, regular/ irregular
Verb Endings
Verbs may change their spelling according to which tense is being used. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Plurals
Regular and irregular plural nouns. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Spelling Words
Why is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plurals
Plurals is the grammatical category in nouns, pronouns, and verbs that refers to more than one thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Verbs
A verb is a word that shows action or state of being. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plural Ending -es
Plural endings adding -es for words ending in sh, ch, x, and z. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.A.2.e. Identify and use verb tenses such as present, past, and future
Verb Endings
Verbs may change their spelling according to which tense is being used. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Past Tense (-ed)
Past tense means something happened in the past. It could be many years ago, yesterday, or just a few minutes ago. Verbs change in special ways to show past tense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.B.1. Recognize examples of conventional USAge in personal and academic reading

Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.B.2. Comprehend and apply standard English USAge in oral and written language

5.B.2.a. Use singular subjects with singular verbs and plural subjects with plural verbs
Verb Endings
Verbs may change their spelling according to which tense is being used. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Plurals
Regular and irregular plural nouns. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Spelling Words
Why is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plurals
Plurals is the grammatical category in nouns, pronouns, and verbs that refers to more than one thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Verbs
A verb is a word that shows action or state of being. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Plural Ending -es
Plural endings adding -es for words ending in sh, ch, x, and z. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.B.2.b. Apply consistent and appropriate use of verb tenses such as past, present, and future; pronouns such as personal and possessive; and modifiers
Verb Endings
Verbs may change their spelling according to which tense is being used. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Past Tense (-ed)
Past tense means something happened in the past. It could be many years ago, yesterday, or just a few minutes ago. Verbs change in special ways to show past tense. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.B.2.c. Recognize and correct common USAge errors such as homophones, contractions, and commonly confused words
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Double Negatives and Homophones
Homophones are words that sound the same, but have different spellings and different meanings. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Contractions
What are Contractions? A contraction is a special word made by putting together a verb and another word. Every contraction has an apostrophe to show where letters are missing from the original two words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Homophones
What are Homophones? Homophones are words that sound exactly alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are sometimes called homonyms. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.B.2.d. Use available resources to correct or confirm editorial choices
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.B.2.e. Explain editorial choices
Writing Process
Prewrite, draft, revise, proofread, and edit. Read more...iWorksheets :3

5.C.2. Apply standard English punctuation and capitalization in written language

5.C.2.a. Use end punctuation correctly
Capitalization/Punctuation
How Should a Sentence End? A sentence should end with a punctuation mark: period (.) for a statement. Question mark (?) for a question. Exclamation point (!) for a sentence that shows excitement. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.C.2.b. Use commas correctly in dates, addresses, city and state, salutations and closings, and items in a series
5.C.2.c. Use underlining for titles of books
5.C.2.d. Use apostrophes in contractions and singular possessives
Nouns
Noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance, or quality Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spelling Words
Why is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Contractions
What are Contractions? A contraction is a special word made by putting together a verb and another word. Every contraction has an apostrophe to show where letters are missing from the original two words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.C.2.e. Use quotation marks in simple dialogue
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.C.2.f. Use capital letters to begin a sentence and identify a proper noun
Capitalization/Punctuation
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Nouns
Noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance, or quality Read more...iWorksheets :3
Proper Nouns
A proper noun is a special name for a particular person, place, or thing. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. If there is more than one word for a particular person, place, or thing, then the first, last, and all important words are capitalized. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3

5.D.1. Recognize conventional spelling in and through personal and academic reading

Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.2. Apply conventional spelling in written language

5.D.2.a. Spell non-phonetic high frequency words
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.D.2.b. Spell words with common prefixes and suffixes
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Word Meaning with Prefixes/Suffixes
Prefixes are letters placed before a root word which change the meaning of the root word. Suffixes are letters placed after the root word which change the meaning of the root word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Suffixes
A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Roots/Prefixes/Suffixes
What are Root Words, Prefixes, and Suffixes? A root word is a word with no prefixes or suffixes added to it. A root word is the basic element, the base, of a word. A prefix is added to the beginning of a root word to form a new word. A suffix is added to the ending of a root word to form a new word. Adding a prefix or suffix to a root word can change the meaning of that root word. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.D.2.c. Modify spellings when adding inflectional endings and suffixes
Text Feature Meaning
Text features include all the components of a story or article that are not the main body of text. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Word Meaning with Prefixes/Suffixes
Prefixes are letters placed before a root word which change the meaning of the root word. Suffixes are letters placed after the root word which change the meaning of the root word. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Decoding Strategies
Decoding means to convert (a coded message) into intelligible language. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Suffixes
A suffix is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Continuous Action (-ing)
How do you add the ING suffix to verbs? We add -ing to many verbs. But to spell them correctly, you need to remember the rules. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Roots/Prefixes/Suffixes
What are Root Words, Prefixes, and Suffixes? A root word is a word with no prefixes or suffixes added to it. A root word is the basic element, the base, of a word. A prefix is added to the beginning of a root word to form a new word. A suffix is added to the ending of a root word to form a new word. Adding a prefix or suffix to a root word can change the meaning of that root word. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.D.2.d. Spell words that follow regular spelling patterns in multi-syllabic words
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.D.2.e. Spell previously studied contractions and possessives
Nouns
Noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance, or quality Read more...iWorksheets :3
Grammar
Grammar is the subject which tells how to speak and write correctly. It is a set of rules that define the structure of a language. Here are some grammar rules you should know. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spelling Words
Why is Spelling Important? It is important to spell words correctly when writing. There are some words that are difficult to learn and to remember how to spell correctly. Homonyms, plurals, and possessive words are often difficult to remember how to spell correctly. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Nouns
A noun is a word used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of these. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Contractions
What are Contractions? A contraction is a special word made by putting together a verb and another word. Every contraction has an apostrophe to show where letters are missing from the original two words. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.D.3. Maintain a personal list of words to use in editing original writing

Syllables/Spelling Patterns
Words can be divided into syllables Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

MD.6.0. Listening

6.A.2. Comprehend and analyze what is heard

6.A.2.b. Identify rhythms and patterns of language, including alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme, and repetition
Rhyming Words
To rhyme, words must have the same vowel sound and the same ending sounds. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Common Core State StandardsConnecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Common Core StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNorth Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR)Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirgin Islands Common Core StandardsVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards