Nebraska Core Academic Content Standards for Kindergarten Math

Adding MoneyWorksheets: 2
Addition, Subtraction and FractionsAddition, Subtraction and Fractions Worksheets and Printables. Add and subtract within 20. Fractions: Slice a pizza, and we get fractions. A fraction represents part of a whole. Read more...iWorksheets: 11
ColorsFreeWorksheets: 20
Counting 1-100FreeWorksheets: 6
Hour/Half-hourWorksheets: 2
How long?Worksheets: 4
How much?Worksheets: 2
Liquid MeasureWorksheets: 5
Measuring LengthWorksheets: 5
MoneyFreeWorksheets: 5
Number OrderWorksheets: 2
Numbers 1-10Worksheets: 21
On & OffWorksheets: 2
One-to-OneWorksheets: 2
Patterns & SortingWorksheets: 22
PositionFreeWorksheets: 8
ShapesFreeWorksheets: 24
TemperatureWorksheets: 2
TimeWorksheets: 5
Wet & DryWorksheets: 2
What time of day?Worksheets: 2
Whole NumbersFreeWorksheets: 45

NE.MA.0.1. NUMBER: Students will communicate number sense concepts using multiple representations to reason, solve problems, and make connections within mathematics and across disciplines.

MA.0.1.1. Numeric Relationships: Students will demonstrate, represent, and show relationships among whole numbers within the base-ten number system.

MA.0.1.1.a. Perform the counting sequence by counting forward from any given number to 100, by ones. Count by tens to 100 starting at any decade number.
Odd and EvenAll numbers are either odd or even. When a number is even, it can be split into two sets without any leftovers. When you split a number into two sets and there is one left over, that means the number is odd. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SequencingWhat is Sequencing? Sequencing means in order. When we count, we count in order or in a sequence. We use sequencing in our every day lives. We follow directions and count in sequence. Try counting by ones. As you say the number, put your finger on the number on the page. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Skip CountingWhat is Skip Counting? Skip counting means you do not say every number as you count. You only count special numbers. There are many different ways to skip count. E.g. when counting by twos, you only say every second number: 2 4 6 8 10. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
MA.0.1.1.c. Use one-to-one correspondence (pairing each object with one and only one spoken number name, and each spoken number name with one and only one object) when counting objects to show the relationship between numbers and quantities of 0 to 20.
Odd and EvenAll numbers are either odd or even. When a number is even, it can be split into two sets without any leftovers. When you split a number into two sets and there is one left over, that means the number is odd. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SequencingWhat is Sequencing? Sequencing means in order. When we count, we count in order or in a sequence. We use sequencing in our every day lives. We follow directions and count in sequence. Try counting by ones. As you say the number, put your finger on the number on the page. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
MA.0.1.1.e. Count up to 20 objects arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle. Count up to 10 objects in a scattered configuration. Count out the number of objects, given a number from 1 to 20.
Odd and EvenAll numbers are either odd or even. When a number is even, it can be split into two sets without any leftovers. When you split a number into two sets and there is one left over, that means the number is odd. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
SequencingWhat is Sequencing? Sequencing means in order. When we count, we count in order or in a sequence. We use sequencing in our every day lives. We follow directions and count in sequence. Try counting by ones. As you say the number, put your finger on the number on the page. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
MA.0.1.1.g. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some more ones by a drawing, model, or equation (e.g., 14 = 10 + 4) to record each composition and decomposition.
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
MA.0.1.1.h. Compare the number of objects in two groups by identifying the comparison as greater than, less than, or equal to by using strategies of matching and counting.
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Greater Than, Less ThanWhen a number is greater than another number, it means that is is larger. > is the greater than symbol. < is the less than symbol. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
SymmetryWhat is Symmetry? Symmetry is when a shape or an object can be folded and both sides of the fold are the same size and shape. The fold line is called the line of symmetry. Not all shapes or objects have a line of symmetry. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
MA.0.1.1.i. Compare the value of two written numerals between 1 and 10.
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Greater Than, Less ThanWhen a number is greater than another number, it means that is is larger. > is the greater than symbol. < is the less than symbol. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Ordering Numbers and Objects by SizeWhat is Ordering? Ordering is when numbers or objects are in a sequence. They may go from smallest to largest. They may go from largest to smallest. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
SequencingWhat is Sequencing? Sequencing means in order. When we count, we count in order or in a sequence. We use sequencing in our every day lives. We follow directions and count in sequence. Try counting by ones. As you say the number, put your finger on the number on the page. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

MA.0.1.2. Operations: Students will demonstrate the meaning of addition and subtraction with whole numbers and compute accurately.

MA.0.1.2.a. Fluently (i.e. automatic recall based on understanding) add and subtract within 5.
Story ProblemsStory problems are a set of sentences that give you the information to a problem that you need to solve. With a story problem, it is your job to figure out whether you will use addition or subtraction to solve the problem. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Commutative PropertyWhat is the commutative property? It is used in addition. Commutative property is when a number sentence is turned around and it still means the same thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NE.MA.0.2. ALGEBRA: Students will communicate algebraic concepts using multiple representations to reason, solve problems, and make connections within mathematics and across disciplines.

MA.0.2.1. Algebraic Relationships: Students will demonstrate, represent, and show relationships with expressions and equations.

MA.0.2.1.a. Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, showing each decomposition with a model, drawing, or equation (e.g., 7 = 4 + 3 and 7 = 1 + 6).
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
MA.0.2.1.b. For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, showing the answer with a model, drawing, or equation.
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

MA.0.2.2. Algebraic Processes: Students will apply the operational properties when adding and subtracting.

No additional indicator(s) at this level.
Story ProblemsStory problems are a set of sentences that give you the information to a problem that you need to solve. With a story problem, it is your job to figure out whether you will use addition or subtraction to solve the problem. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Commutative PropertyWhat is the commutative property? It is used in addition. Commutative property is when a number sentence is turned around and it still means the same thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

MA.0.2.3. Applications: Students will solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction.

MA.0.2.3.a. Solve real-world problems that involve addition and subtraction within 10 (e.g., by using objects, drawings or equations to represent the problem).
Story ProblemsStory problems are a set of sentences that give you the information to a problem that you need to solve. With a story problem, it is your job to figure out whether you will use addition or subtraction to solve the problem. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Subtraction FactsSubtraction is taking a group of objects and separating them. When you subtract, your answer gets smaller. If you subtract zero from a number, you answer will stay the same. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Using Number LineWhat is a Number Line? Number lines can be used to help with many different ways. The most common ways are for addition and subtraction. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Commutative PropertyWhat is the commutative property? It is used in addition. Commutative property is when a number sentence is turned around and it still means the same thing. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Vocabulary :1
Addition FactsFreeWhat is Addition? Addition is taking two groups of objects and putting them together. When adding, the answer gets larger. When you add 0, the answer remains the same. <br>How to Add: The two numbers you are adding together are called addends. Read more...iWorksheets :13Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
One Less, One MoreWhat is One Less or One More? One less means the number that comes before. One more means the number that comes after. How to figure out one more: If you are given a number, say 2. You are asked to find the number that is one more. You count on from 2 and the answer is 3. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

NE.MA.0.3. GEOMETRY: Students will communicate geometric concepts and measurement concepts using multiple representations to reason, solve problems, and make connections within mathematics and across disciplines.

MA.0.3.1. Characteristics: Students will identify and describe geometric characteristics and create two- and three-dimensional shapes.

MA.0.3.1.a. Describe real-world objects using names of shapes, regardless of their orientation or size (e.g., squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, spheres, and cylinders).
ShapesFreeA shape is the form something takes. Read more...iWorksheets :12Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2
MA.0.3.1.c. Compare and analyze two- and three-dimensional shapes, with different sizes and orientations to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number “corners”/vertices), and other attributes (e.g., sides of equal length).
ShapesFreeA shape is the form something takes. Read more...iWorksheets :12Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

MA.0.3.2. Coordinate Geometry: Students will determine location, orientation, and relationships on the coordinate plane.

MA.0.3.2.a. Describe the relative positions of objects (e.g., above, below, beside, in front of, behind, next to, between).
Relative PositionWhat is Relative Position? Relative position describes where an object or person is compared to another object or person. The terms used in relative position are: below, up, next to, left, right, under, over, behind, on front of, far near, down. Read more...iWorksheets :12Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

MA.0.3.3. Measurement: Students will perform and compare measurements and apply formulas.

MA.0.3.3.a. Describe measurable attributes of real-world objects (e.g., length or weight).
MeasurementFreeWhat is measurement? Measurement is used in our everyday lives. We measure to cook or bake, and how far away a place is. There are metric measurements which include liters, centimeters, grams and kilograms. Read more...iWorksheets :12Study Guides :1Vocabulary :2

NE.MA.0.4. DATA: Students will communicate data analysis/probability concepts using multiple representations to reason, solve problems, and make connections within mathematics and across disciplines.

MA.0.4.2. Analysis & Applications: Students will analyze data to address the situation.

MA.0.4.2.a. Identify, sort, and classify objects by size, shape, color, and other attributes. Identify objects that do not belong to a particular group and explain the reasoning used.
AttributesFreeAn attribute describes an object. <br>You use attributes to describe two objects when they are not the same. <br>An attribute can tell you if an object is shorter, taller, longer or smaller than another object. Read more...iWorksheets :18Study Guides :1Vocabulary :3
Ordering Numbers and Objects by SizeWhat is Ordering? Ordering is when numbers or objects are in a sequence. They may go from smallest to largest. They may go from largest to smallest. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
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