Indiana Academic Standards for Fifth Grade Social Studies

Growth of a Nation
During the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets: 7Study Guides: 1
Holidays, Landmarks, & Symbols
National Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
Local & State Government
The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Notable People-Westward Expansion
What is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets: 4Study Guides: 1
Urbanization
Urbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Westward Expansion
During the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1

IN.5. The United States—The Founding of the Republic

5.1. History: Students describe the historical movements that influenced the development of the United States from pre-Columbian times up to 1800, with an emphasis on the American Revolution and the founding of the United States.

Historical Knowledge - Ways of Life Before and After the Arrival of Europeans to 1610
5.1.1. Identify and describe early cultures and settlements that existed in North America prior to contact with Europeans.
Native People of the U.S.
Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.2. Examine accounts of early European explorations of North America including major land and water routes, reasons for exploration and the impact the exploration had.
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.1.3. Compare and contrast historic Indian groups of the West, Southwest, Northwest, Arctic and sub-Arctic, Great Plains, and Eastern Woodlands regions at the beginning of European exploration in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
Algonquians
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois
'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Native People of the U.S.
Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.4. Locate and compare the origins, physical structure and social structure of early Spanish, French and British settlements.
Famous Explorers
From Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Historical Knowledge - Colonization and Settlements: 1607 to 1763
5.1.5. Compare and contrast the religious, political and economic reasons for the colonization of the Americas by Europe.
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.1.6. Identify and explain instances of both cooperation and conflict that existed between Native American Indians and colonists.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.1.7. Identify and locate the 13 British colonies by region (New England, Middle, Southern) and describe the political, social, and economic organization and structure of each region.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.1.8. Identify the early founders of colonial settlements and describe early colonial resistance to British rule.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Historical Knowledge - The American Revolution: 1763 to 1783
5.1.9. Understand how political, religious, and economic ideas brought about the American Revolution.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.10. Analyze the causes of the American Revolution as outlined in the Declaration of Independence.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
American Symbols & Holidays
FreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.11. Identify major British and American leaders of the American Revolutionary War and describe their significance in key events of the war.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.12. Describe the contributions of France and other nations and of individuals to the outcome of the American Revolution.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.13. Identify contributions of women and minorities during the American Revolution.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.14. Explain consequences of the American Revolution including the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, changes in trade relationships and the achievement of independence by the United States.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Historical Knowledge - Making the United States Constitution and Establishing the Federal Republic: 1783 to 1800
5.1.15. Explain why the United States Constitution was created in 1787 and how it established a stronger union among the original 13 states by making it the supreme law of the land. Identify people who were involved in its development.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.16. Describe the origins and drafting of the Bill of Rights, ratified in 1791.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Chronological Thinking, Historical Comprehension, Analysis and Interpretation, Research
5.1.18. Create and interpret timelines showing major people, events and developments in the early history of the United States from 1776-1801.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.19. Read fiction and nonfiction stories about conflicts among and between groups of people at different stages in the formation of the United States; give examples of how these conflicts were resolved and analyze the accuracy of the stories’ historical details and sequence of events.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
5.1.20. Using primary and secondary sources to examine an historical account about an issue of the time, reconstruct the literal meaning of the passages by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments and what consequences or outcomes followed.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American War
The United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.21. Read and interpret primary and secondary source accounts that pertain to a problem confronting people during the Founding Era of the United States.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the Revolution
Actions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.1.22. Identify and describe the contributions of important early American artists and writers and traditional arts and crafts to the new nation’s cultural landscape.
Notable People
A Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

5.2. Civics and Government: Students identify main components and characteristics of the United States government. Students identify and explain key ideas in government from the colonial and founding periods that continue to shape civic and political life.

Foundations of Government
5.2.1. Summarize the principles and purposes of government as stated in the Preamble to the United States Constitution.
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.2.2. Identify and explain ideas about limited government, the rule of law and individual rights in key colonial era documents.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
American Symbols & Holidays
FreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.2.3. Give examples and explain how the British colonies in America developed forms of representative government, self-government and democratic practices.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.2.4. Identify and explain key ideas about government as noted in the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Northwest Ordinance, United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Pioneer Life
A pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
American Symbols & Holidays
FreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
European/Native American Encounter
Native Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
The Revolution
FreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.2.5. Describe and give examples of individual rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Functions of Government
5.2.6. Describe the primary and general election process for local, state and national offices, including those used to select congressional and presidential office holders.
U.S. Presidents
FreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Election Process
The United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.2.7. Identify the three branches of the United States government and explain the functions of each.
U.S. Congress
History of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a Government
A government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Types of Government
Some examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. Court System
Federal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The Presidency
Presidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution
“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. Senate
What is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Roles of Citizens
5.2.8. Describe group and individual actions that illustrate civic virtues, such as civility, cooperation, respect and responsible participation.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Election Process
The United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.2.9. Examine ways by which citizens may effectively voice opinions, monitor government, and bring about change in government including voting and participation in the election process.
Citizenship and Government
Concepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of Government
Government representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Election Process
The United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

5.3. Geography: Students describe the influence of the Earth/sun relationship on climate and use global grid systems; identify regions; describe physical and cultural characteristics; and locate states, capitals and major physical features of the United States. They also explain the changing interaction of people with their environment in regions of the United States and show how the United States is related geographically to the rest of the world.

The World in Spatial Terms
5.3.1. Demonstrate that lines of latitude and longitude are measured in degrees of a circle, that places can be precisely located where these lines intersect, and that location can be stated in terms of degrees north or south of the equator and east or west of the prime meridian.
Map Skills
Identify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.
Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...
iWorksheets :3
Social Studies Skills
Social Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Map Skills
A map is a picture of a place. We use maps to help us know where things are. In order to use a map, you need to know a few things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Places and Regions
5.3.3. Use maps and globes to locate states, capitals, major cities, major rivers, the Great Lakes, and mountain ranges in the United States.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States & Capitals I
Each of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States & Capitals II
Each of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region US
The twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States and Capitals
What is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
American Landmarks
American landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.3.4. Identify Native American Indian and colonial settlements on maps and explain the reasons for the locations of these places.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.
Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Physical Systems
5.3.5. Locate the continental divide and the major drainage basins in the United States.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
5.3.7. Identify major sources of accessible fresh water and describe the impact of access on the local and regional communities.
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region US
The twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Geography
What is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Human Systems
5.3.8. Explain how the Spanish, British and French colonists altered the character and use of land in early America.
Famous Explorers
From Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Exploration
Expoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.3.9. Identify the major manufacturing and agricultural regions in colonial America and summarize the ways that agriculture and manufacturing changed between 1600 and 1800.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.3.10. Using historical maps and other geographic representations/texts (written, maps, graphs, timelines, etc.) locate and explain the conflict over the use of land by Native American Indians and the European colonists.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Environment and Society
5.3.11. Describe adaptation and how Native American Indians and colonists adapted to variations in the physical environment.
Timelines, Graphs, Charts
Time Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.3.12. Describe and analyze how specific physical features influenced historical events and movements.
New York Map - Political
Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Northeastern Region US
The Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States & Capitals I
Each of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Western Region US
The eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region US
The four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States & Capitals II
Each of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States and Capitals
What is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New York Map - Physical
Geography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3

5.4. Economics: Students describe the productive resources and market relationships that influence the way people produce goods and services and earn a living in the United States in different historical periods. Students consider the importance of economic decision making and how people make economic choices that influence their future.

5.4.1. Describe the economic activities within and among Native American Indian cultures prior to contact with Europeans. Examine the economic incentives that helped motivate European exploration and colonization.
Native People of the U.S.
Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
First Americans
It is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.4.2. Summarize a market economy and give examples of how the colonial and early American economy exhibited these characteristics.
Colonization
What are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies
The Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial Life
People came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial Period
FreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
5.4.3. Define types of trade barriers.
Famous Treaties
A treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.4.4. Describe the impact of technological developments and major inventions on business productivity during the early development of the United States.
Impact of Industrialization
After the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & Expansion
Current and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5.4.7. Predict the effect of changes in supply and demand on price.
Economics
Understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & Demand
The term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market Economy
What is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
5.4.8. Analyze how the causes and effects of changes in price of certain goods and services had significant influence on events in United States history.
Industrialization/Economics
An Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Great Depression
In 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Standards

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

Alabama Courses of StudyAlaska Content and Performance StandardsArizona's College and Career Ready StandardsArkansas Curriculum FrameworksCalifornia Content StandardsColorado Academic Standards (CAS)Connecticut Core StandardsDelaware Standards and InstructionFlorida StandardsGeorgia Standards of ExcellenceHawaii Content and Performance StandardsIdaho Content StandardsIllinois Learning StandardsIndiana Academic StandardsIowa CoreKansas Academic StandardsKentucky Academic StandardsLouisiana Academic StandardsMaine Learning ResultsMaryland College and Career-Ready StandardsMaryland StandardsMassachusetts Curriculum FrameworksMichigan Academic StandardsMinnesota Academic StandardsMississippi College & Career Readiness StandardsMissouri Learning StandardsMontana Content StandardsNebraska Core Academic Content StandardsNevada Academic Content StandardsNew Hampshire College and Career Ready StandardsNew Jersey Student Learning StandardsNew Mexico Content StandardsNew York State Learning Standards and Core CurriculumNorth Carolina Standard Course of StudyNorth Dakota Academic Content StandardsOhio Learning StandardsOklahoma Academic StandardsOregon Academic Content StandardsP21's Framework for 21st CenturyPennsylvania Core and Academic StandardsRhode Island World-Class StandardsSouth Carolina Standards & LearningSouth Dakota Content StandardsTennessee Academic StandardsTexas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)U.S. National StandardsUtah Core StandardsVermont Framework of Standards and LearningVirginia Standards of LearningWashington DC Academic StandardsWashington State K–12 Learning Standards and GuidelinesWest Virginia College and Career Readiness StandardsWisconsin Academic StandardsWyoming Content and Performance Standards