Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Fifth Grade Social Studies

Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets: 6Study Guides: 1
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets: 3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets: 3Study Guides: 1

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

1 Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

Civic knowledge includes the core knowledge in the Content Standards relating to civics and government, economics, geography, and history.
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civic intellectual skills encompass knowing how to identify, assess, interpret, describe, analyze and explain matters of concern in civic life.
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civic participatory skills encompass knowing how to make and support arguments, use the political process to communicate with elected officials and representatives of government, and plan strategically for civic change.
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

3 Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Social Studies SkillsSocial Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1

4 Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 3-5 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Key Ideas and Details
1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences (See grades 3-5 Writing Standard 8 for more on paraphrasing.)
Review Grades 1-4Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments <br>Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions <br>Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence <br>What is Government and what should it do? Read more...iWorksheets :3
New York Map - PoliticalGeography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Map SkillsIdentify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.<br> Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IEach of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Social Studies SkillsSocial Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/EconomicsAn Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifeA pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. Court SystemFederal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Tall TalesHow do you know if a story is a tall tale? While you are reading, ask these 3 questions: Is this full of exaggerations? Does the main character overcome a very hard thing? Is the hero “larger than life”? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IIEach of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Resources & EnergyEnergy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First AmericansIt is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Map SkillsA map is a picture of a place. We use maps to help us know where things are. In order to use a map, you need to know a few things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States and CapitalsWhat is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
American LandmarksAmerican landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New York Map - PhysicalGeography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GeographyWhat is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
2 Determine the main ideas of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize a text.
Review Grades 1-4Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments <br>Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions <br>Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence <br>What is Government and what should it do? Read more...iWorksheets :3
New York Map - PoliticalGeography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Map SkillsIdentify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.<br> Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IEach of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Social Studies SkillsSocial Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/EconomicsAn Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifeA pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. Court SystemFederal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Tall TalesHow do you know if a story is a tall tale? While you are reading, ask these 3 questions: Is this full of exaggerations? Does the main character overcome a very hard thing? Is the hero “larger than life”? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IIEach of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Resources & EnergyEnergy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First AmericansIt is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Map SkillsA map is a picture of a place. We use maps to help us know where things are. In order to use a map, you need to know a few things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States and CapitalsWhat is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
American LandmarksAmerican landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New York Map - PhysicalGeography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GeographyWhat is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
3 Explain events, ideas, and concepts in a civics, geography, economics, or history text, based on specific information in the text.
Review Grades 1-4Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments <br>Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions <br>Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence <br>What is Government and what should it do? Read more...iWorksheets :3
New York Map - PoliticalGeography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Map SkillsIdentify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.<br> Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IEach of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Social Studies SkillsSocial Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/EconomicsAn Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifeA pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. Court SystemFederal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Tall TalesHow do you know if a story is a tall tale? While you are reading, ask these 3 questions: Is this full of exaggerations? Does the main character overcome a very hard thing? Is the hero “larger than life”? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IIEach of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Resources & EnergyEnergy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First AmericansIt is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Map SkillsA map is a picture of a place. We use maps to help us know where things are. In order to use a map, you need to know a few things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States and CapitalsWhat is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
American LandmarksAmerican landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New York Map - PhysicalGeography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GeographyWhat is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Craft and Structure
4 Determine the meaning of general academic vocabulary and words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
Review Grades 1-4Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments <br>Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions <br>Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence <br>What is Government and what should it do? Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifeA pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
U.S. Court SystemFederal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
First AmericansIt is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
American LandmarksAmerican landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5 Describe the overall structure of how a text presents information (e.g., chronological, compare/contrast, problem/solution, cause effect), including how written texts incorporate features such as headings.
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event.
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7 Interpret information presented in charts, graphs, timelines, and illustrations and explain what that information contributes to the overall text.
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
9 Integrate information from two texts in order to write or speak about a history/social science topic.
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10 Independently and proficiently read and comprehend history/social studies texts exhibiting complexity appropriate for the grades 3-5.
Review Grades 1-4Experiences that provide for the study of people, places and environments <br>Experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions <br>Experiences that provide for the study of global connections and independence <br>What is Government and what should it do? Read more...iWorksheets :3
New York Map - PoliticalGeography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. Read more...iWorksheets :3
EconomicsUnderstanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Northeastern Region USThe Northeastern Region of the United States of America is made up of the New England States and the Middle Atlantic States. The region enjoys fours seasons, and the land varies from sunny beaches to majestic mountains. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Algonquians'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Algonquins living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Iroquois'Culture' refers to the socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of Iroquois living together as a group of people. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Map SkillsIdentify and use a variety of primary and secondary sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and other sources.<br> Research and analyze past periods, events, and issues, using a variety of primary sources Read more...iWorksheets :3
Holidays, Landmarks, & SymbolsNational Holidays are those days set aside to honor people or events important in the history of a country. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. CongressHistory of the United States: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IEach of the 50 states of the United States has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Social Studies SkillsSocial Studies Skills are those that help a student better understanding the world around him or her. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Western Region USThe eleven states that make up the Western Region are Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Hawaii. The region stretches thousands of miles from Hawaii to Colorado. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ArchaeologyMany people study the past to see what life was like before our time. Certain people, called archaeologists, study the past through looking at the remains of people and societies before us. There remains can be material goods, bodies, or even entire cities that were preserved in time. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ExplorationExpoloration is the investigation of unknown regions. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/EconomicsAn Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southwestern Region USThe four states in the Southwestern Region are Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifeA pioneer is a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance was an American movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated the African-American culture through art, music, and literature. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. Court SystemFederal and state courts, Constitution, jury, verdict, justices. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous TreatiesA treaty is an agreement made between two nations. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Panama CanalThe Panama Canal is located in Central America, and connects the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea). It was built in the early 1900’s in order to create a shorter route for trade. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
HolocaustThe Holocaust took place during World War II. The Holocaust is what we call the mass killing of these people. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Great DepressionIn 1929, investors began to sell off their stock, which caused the stock market to crash. People were not paid back their investments and lost money. Businesses and factories closed down because no one could afford to buy the products. Many workers lost their jobs. This was the beginning of the Great Depression. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
TVAAfter the Great Depression, some states needed help to modernize their economies. The TVA, or Tennessee Valley Authority, set out to help the area around the Tennessee River. As a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the TVA helped people get electricity and learn new, improved ways of farming. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Election ProcessThe United States presidential election is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia cast ballots for members of the Electoral College, known as electors. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Tall TalesHow do you know if a story is a tall tale? While you are reading, ask these 3 questions: Is this full of exaggerations? Does the main character overcome a very hard thing? Is the hero “larger than life”? Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
World War IIn the late 1800’s, Europeans were feeling a strong sense of nationalism . Many countries were competing with one another and as tension between the nations grew, they started to build strong armies to prepare for war. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Laws of Supply & DemandThe term supply refers to the amount of goods that are available for sale. The term demand refers to how many people want the good or service that is for sale. The price of a good has an effect on how many people want to buy it. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Ancient GreeceAbout 4,000 years ago, in the land that we know today as Greece, people from different cultures began to settle down and create villages. These villages made up the area called ancient Greece. Ancient Greece was the trading center of the Mediterranean. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient RomeFreeAncient Rome was a civilization that began as a small village in Italy. They eventually were in control of the Mediterranean after the rule of ancient Greece. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
World War IIn the mid 1900’s, Hitler and the Nazi party in Germany were trying to gain control of many European nations. They used military force and Hitler’s leadership to gain support of the German people, and succeeded in taking power from other countries. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient EgyptFreeAncient Egypt was located on the fertile area surrounding the Nile River. The people of ancient Egypt used the land and river to set up villages. Ancient Egypt was ruled by many different Kings, or Pharaohs, who passed down their throne to members of their families. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
States & Capitals IIEach of the 50 states has a capital city. The capital city is the place where the state government is located. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Ancient Trade RoutesTrade routes created a system where merchants could safely trade with other people. Merchants created stopping points along the way where people could rest and get supplies. Trade routes were mapped so travelers knew where they were going and did not risk getting lost. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Resources & EnergyEnergy powers almost everything that we use. Many people use different resources to heat their homes, turn on their televisions, and drive their cars. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Spanish American WarThe United States was worried about the way the Cuban people were being treated by Spain. The United States fought Spain in Cuba for a short period of time. When the Spanish American War ended, Cuba was independent from Spain and the Spanish empire had lost a great deal of power. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
First AmericansIt is believed that the first human beings came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, a bridge of land connected Asia and North America. The first Americans crossed the bridge of land from Asia to North America. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Map SkillsA map is a picture of a place. We use maps to help us know where things are. In order to use a map, you need to know a few things. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
States and CapitalsWhat is a state? In the United State, a state is a political division. Boundaries between states are either lines drawn by people or natural lines, like rivers. There are 50 states in the United States of America. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
American LandmarksAmerican landmarks are places that have been important in American history. Some of them are natural landmarks like Grand Canyon, some are memorials like Lincoln Memorial, some are important buildings and some are battle sites like Gettysburg. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
New York Map - PhysicalGeography: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth's surface. Read more...iWorksheets :3
GeographyWhat is Geography? Geography is the study of the Earth's surface. Continents like North America, South America, Africa, Australia and Eurasia are major land formations. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
U.S. SenateWhat is the Senate? The Senate is one of the two houses of Congress. The other house is the House of Representatives. Congress is the legislative branch of government. Congress meets in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. There are two senators from each state, with 100 total senators. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Market EconomyWhat is a Market Economy? An economic system is the way a country makes and sells goods. In some countries, the government is in charge of what people buy and sell. In a market economy, people choose what goods and services they want to buy. They also choose where they want to work and what they want to do. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Grade 5 – United States History to the Civil War and the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Topic 1. Early colonization and growth of colonies – Supporting Question: To what extent was North America a land of opportunity, and for whom?

1 Explain the early relationships of English settlers to Native Peoples in the 1600s and 1700s, including the impact of diseases introduced by Europeans in severely reducing Native populations, the differing views on land ownership or use, property rights, and the conflicts between the two groups (e.g., the Pequot and King Philip’s Wars in New England).
Timelines, Graphs, ChartsTime Lines, Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams are graphics that provide information to the reader and are used to add to the words used in documents so the reader can understand the information. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
3 Analyze the reasons why English colonists had the strongest influence on the language, political institutions, and political principles of the country that became the United States of America, even though other major European nations also explored North America (e.g., the relatively small number of colonists from other nations, England’s history of self- government, high rates of literacy, and strong economic, and military position in the world).
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
4 On a map of the United States, locate the first 13 colonies and describe the impact of regional differences in climate on the types of crops that could be grown or harvested profitably in the Northern, mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies; describe varied sources of labor (e.g., self-employed colonists, apprentices, employees, indentured servants, free and enslaved Africans).
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
5 Describe the origins of slavery, its legal status in all the colonies through the 18th century, and the prevalence of slave ownership, including by many of the country’s early leaders (e.g., George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, George Mason.)
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
6 Describe the Triangular Trade and the harsh conditions of trans-Atlantic voyages (called the Middle Passage) for enslaved Africans.
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
7 Compare and contrast the living and working conditions of enslaved and free Africans in the colonies in the 18th century, and explain how some enslaved people sought their freedom.
a. Enslaved African Americans were property that could be bought, sold, and separated from their families by their owners; they were generally not taught to read or write, and generally owned no property; they suffered many kinds of abuse and could be punished if they were caught after running away from their masters. A number of slave rebellions resulted from these harsh conditions.
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
b. Many enslaved Africans became skilled artisans, such as cabinetmakers, coopers, and ironworkers and could be hired out to work.
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
c. Some Africans came to America as indentured servants or sailors and were freed when their service was completed; some former slaves were granted freedom and some in the North took legal action to obtain their freedom (e.g., in Massachusetts, Elizabeth Freeman, Quock Walker, and Prince Hall).
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
ImmigrationAn immigrant is a person who comes to live in another country. Immigrants came to live in the United States for many reasons Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1

Topic 2. Reasons for revolution, the Revolutionary War, and the formation of government – Supporting Questions: Why did most Native Peoples side with the French against the British in the French and Indian Wars? Were the colonists justified in rebelling against Great Britain in the American Revolution?

8 Explain the reasons for the French and Indian War and how its costs led to an overhaul of British imperial policy; explain key British policies and the colonial response to them:
a. policies: the Proclamation of 1763, the Sugar Act (1764), the Stamp Act (1765), the Townsend Duties (1767), the Tea Act (1773), the Intolerable Acts (1774)
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
b. the slogan, “no taxation without representation”
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
c. the roles of the Stamp Act Congress, the Sons of Liberty, and the Boston Tea (1773), the Suffolk Resolves (1774), in which Massachusetts declared a boycott of British goods, the early battles between Massachusetts colonists and the British soldiers in Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill (1775) and the evacuation of the British from Boston (1776)
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
d. the role of women in the boycott of British textiles and tea, in writing to support liberty, in managing family farms and businesses, raising funds for the war, and supporting the Continental Army (1760s-1780s)
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
9 On a historic map of the Boston area in the 1770s, locate important sites in the pre- Revolutionary and Revolutionary period and analyze the role and the significance of Massachusetts people such Samuel Adams, Crispus Attucks, John Hancock, James Otis, Paul Revere, John and Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Phillis Wheatley, Peter Salem.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
10 Explain the development of colonial governments and describe how these developments (e.g., legislative bodies, town meetings, and charters on individual freedoms and rights) contributed to the Revolution.
ColonizationWhat are colonists? Why Colonize? Identifying significant early European. Identifying major leaders, economic impact, and changes in colonial society. Identifying geographic features, landforms, and differences in climates among the colonies. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
New England, Middle, and Southern ColoniesThe Thirteen American colonies belonging to Great Britain were located along the eastern coast of what is now the United States of America. The colonies were divided into three groups, based on their locations and their economies Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Colonial LifePeople came to this New World for many reasons: religious freedom, political freedom, adventure, hope of land and money. They came to a land that was hard to live in. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
11 Read the Declaration of Independence (1776), explain its main argument, the reasons given for seeking independence, the meaning of the key ideas on equality and natural and legal rights, and the rule of law.
American Symbols & HolidaysFreeThere are many things that are symbols of America. There are also holidays that Americans celebrate every year: Memorial Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mother's Day Read more...iWorksheets :8Study Guides :6
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
12 Describe the impact of events as the Revolutionary War continued; locate the sites of events on a map, and explain the factors leading to American victory and British defeat:
c. The battle of Yorktown in Virginia (1781)
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
13 Explain that many Americans remained loyal to the British Crown or remained neutral in the conflict and that Native Peoples and free and enslaved Africans fought on both sides in the Revolution.
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
14 Compare and contrast the impact of the actions of important leaders (e.g., John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, King George III, Edmund Burke, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Washington, the Marquis de Lafayette) during the Revolution and the early years of the United States Republic.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
InventorsAn inventor is someone who discovers a new way of doing things. This can be in the form of a product or an idea. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Colonial PeriodFreeColonies, settlement, Plymouth, apothecary, plantation, Puritans. Read more...iWorksheets :3
The RevolutionFreeWhat was the American Revolution? The American Revolution was the name of the war that the colonists fought to gain their freedom from Great Britain. The American Revolution took place because the colonists and Great Britain disagreed about: Taxation without representation, Trade agreements and Self-government. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Leading Up to the RevolutionActions by both Great Britain and the American colonists led to the American Revolution. Actions of the British: Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Intolerable Acts. Actions of the Colonists: boycott of products from Great Britain, Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty destroyed the houses of the people collecting taxes for Great Britain. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
15 Explain the reasons for the adoption of the Articles of Confederation in 1781, the weaknesses of the Articles as a plan for government, and the reasons for their failure.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
16 Analyze the causes of Shays’ Rebellion of 1786-1787 and explain why it was one of the crucial events leading to the Constitutional Convention.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

Topic 3. Principles of United States Government – Supporting Question: How did the Constitution attempt to balance competing interests, the question of power, and ideas about slavery?

17 Read the Preamble to and sections of the Constitution and explain how these writings reflect the following political principles: individual rights and responsibilities, equality, the rule of law, general welfare, limited government, representative democracy.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
18 Explain how the framers of the Constitution divided and shared powers among the three branches of the United States government; describe the function of each branch and the system of checks and balances.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
19 Describe the responsibilities of government at the federal, state, and local levels (e.g., protection of individual rights and the provision of services such as law enforcement and the building and funding of schools).
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local & State GovernmentThe study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. Read more...iWorksheets :3
Types of GovernmentSome examples of different types of governments are: Aristocracy, Democracy, Dictatorship, Anarchy, Oligarchy Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
The PresidencyPresidential term, duties, home, Cabinet Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Purposes of GovernmentGovernment representatives, fundamental rights, majority, citizen Read more...iWorksheets :3
State GovernmentState government is much like the federal government. There are 3 branches: executive, legislative and judical. This gives a system of checks and balances, to make sure that no one party gets too much power. Each state has its own Constitution. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Local GovernmentLocal government is the county, city, town, or village government. Government workers are elected by the people who live in the city, town, or county. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
20 Analyze the significance of the major issues debated by members of the Constitutional Convention (e.g., the distribution of political power, the rights of individuals, rights of states, tensions between states with large and smaller populations, the make-up of the Senate and electoral college, slavery and the question of how slaves were to be counted in the Census); explain why the framers agreed to the 3/5 Compromise in order to keep the states united and how the decision reinforced the institution of slavery and the power of states in which slavery was particularly prevalent.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
21 Explain that voting rights and property rights did not extend to women in the new Constitution.
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1

Topic 4. The growth of the Republic – Supporting Question: How did events of the early Republic test the newly-founded United States?

22 Read the Bill of Rights and explain the freedoms it guarantees; research the historical background of one of the first ten Amendments and make an argument using evidence for its inclusion in the Bill of Rights in 1791.
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
23 Identify the first three Presidents of the United States (George Washington, 1787-1797, John Adams, 1797-1801, and Thomas Jefferson, 1801-1809); summarize key developments during their time (e.g., the founding of political parties in the 1790s; the first Bank of the U.S., the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798; the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, the Haitian Revolution in 1804), and evaluate their leadership of the new nation.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable PeopleA Notable Person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Read more...iWorksheets :6Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
U.S. Constitution“We the People…”. The Constitution was drafted by James Madison and then discussed at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787. Each of the 13 states could send delegates to this convention. Constitution became an important document for America, since it set up many ideas by which the U.S. is now governed. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
24 Evaluate the importance to the nation of the Louisiana Purchase and trace the expedition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, with Sacagawea and the Corps of Discovery, from 1803 to 1806.
Famous ExplorersFrom Columbus’ discovery of the Americas to Hillary’s quest up Mount Everest, the names of these famous explorers will remain important for centuries. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionDuring the 1800's, the boundaries of the United States were extended westward. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Westward ExpansionLewis and Clark, Homestead Act of 1862, Pony Express, John Fremont, Oregon Trail, Louisiana Purchase. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Notable People-Westward ExpansionWhat is a Notable Person? A notable person is a person who contributes to a cause in a special way. Many people contributed toward the westward expansion of the United States during the 1800's. Notable People related to the Louisiana Purchase were: Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Napoleon, Sacajawea. People related to Texas and the Alamo were: Santa Anna, Susannah Dickinson, Stephen Austin, Jim Bowie, William Travis, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, President James K. Polk. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
25 Describe the causes of the War of 1812 and how events during the war contributed to a sense of American nationalism:
a. British restrictions on trade and impressment
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
b. Major battles and events of the war, including the role of the USS Constitution, the burning of the Capitol and the White House, and the Battle of New Orleans
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
27 Explain 19th century conflicts between Native Peoples and national, state, and local governments in the United States over land ownership and rights to self-government:
b. President Andrew Jackson and the Indian Removal Act (1830), which forced native communities to move from their ancestral lands in the Southeast to territory west of the Mississippi River
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
d. the significance of the Trail of Tears (1838) for the Cherokee and other native communities in the Southeast
Native People of the U.S.Native means the people who originally lived in this land. There are many Native American tribes, each with their own unique way of life. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
European/Native American EncounterNative Americans lived in the Americas long before Europeans, including the Pilgrims, arrived. Early Native Americans believed that all people shared the land. Europeans, however, believed that individuals owned the land. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1

Topic 5. Slavery, the legacy of the Civil War, and the struggle for civil rights for all – Supporting Question: What ideas and events of the 19th century led to the expansion of civil rights in the 20th and 21st centuries?

29 Identify the major reasons for the Civil War (e.g., slavery, political and economic competition in Western territories, the emergence of the Republican Party) and the war’s most important outcomes (e.g., end of slavery, Reconstruction, expanded role of the federal government, industrial growth in the North).
Citizenship and GovernmentConcepts and ideals such as: individual dignity, liberty, justice, equality, individual rights, responsibility, majority and minority rights, and civil dissent. Citizens' rights and responsibilities. Plan of government. Bill of rights. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Impact of IndustrializationAfter the Industrial Revolution, many other countries followed Great Britain's example and started to create new technology. The industrial revolution led other nations to want new and easier ways to make goods. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Industrialization/EconomicsAn Industrial Revolution is a change in the way goods are manufactured. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Industrial Growth & ExpansionCurrent and past issues involving science and technology. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationUrbanization refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas. Read more...iWorksheets :3
UrbanizationWhat is Urbanization? When the population of a city grows quickly, it is because a large number of people move to a city in a short amount of time. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Class SystemsThroughout history, groups of people have been divided into many different categories. These categories are called classes. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain with the invention of new farming technology. In the mid 1700’s, farmers began to come up with new ideas and technology to make farming more efficient. These ideas made farming much easier and less people were needed to work the land. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Southeastern Region USThe twelve states in the Southeastern Region are Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The region is known for its many rivers. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
30 Explain the ideas and roles of some of the people of the pre-Civil War era who led the struggle against slavery (abolitionism) and for voting and property rights for African Americans (e.g., Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe).
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Growth of a NationDuring the first half of the 1800's, the United States of America began to take its place in the World. The new nation grew in area and population. Technology changed the way in which people lived and worked. Nationalism, an intense feeling of loyalty to a person's nation, increased. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
31 Identify the major military leaders and battles of the Civil War (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, William Tecumseh Sherman, Stonewall Jackson; Battles of Bull Run, Shiloh, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, Appomattox).
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
32 Describe the role of Abraham Lincoln in the development of the Republican Party and his actions as President during the Civil War, including the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Middle Western Region USThe twelve states in the Middle Western Region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This region, often called "the heartland," is located in the center of the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
U.S. PresidentsFreeThe president is the highest leader in the United States. Each president serves a four year term and then can be re-elected for one more term. Read more...iWorksheets :5Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Civil WarConfederacy, Emancipation Proclamation, Antietam, union, plantations, slavery, abolishing slavery, Bull Run, American Red Cross, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Abraham Lincoln. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Pioneer LifePioneers are the first people who settle in an area. People traveled west to explore new parts of the U.S. during the 1800s. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Presidential HistoryThe president is the highest leader in the U.S. Each president is elected to office for a four year term. A president can then be reelected for another term. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
33 Explain the consequences of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments for the rights of African Americans:
a. advocacy for women’s rights surrounding the passage of the 14th and 15th Amendments and its relationship to the later movement for women’s rights
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
b. women’s attainment of the right to vote with the passage of the 19th Amendment of 1920
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
34 Describe living conditions for African Americans following the Civil War, during the Jim Crow era, including limited educational and economic opportunities, separate public facilities (e.g., segregated schools and colleges, neighborhoods, sections in buses, trains, restaurants, and movie theaters), the organized perpetuation of white supremacist beliefs and the threat of violence from extra-legal groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. Describe the role African American churches, civic organizations, and newspapers played in supporting and unifying African American communities.
Great MigrationWhat was the Great Migration? In the early 1900’s, many African-Americans wanted to leave the south in order to find a better life. There were not many opportunities in the south, and the African-Americans that did have jobs as sharecroppers were losing crops. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
35 Research and analyze one of the people, organizations, events, or legislative acts from the-20th century that contributed to expanding civil rights of African Americans, women, and others in the United States.
Forming a GovernmentA government is the system by which a state or community is controlled. Read more...iWorksheets :7Study Guides :1
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
Famous AmericansThere are many people who have had an impact on American history. These people were often common, ordinary people who did something special. Many helped to change our country by what they did. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
Progressive MovementWhat is the Progressive Movement? During the Progressive movement, citizens found out how poorly people were being treated and tried to change this. Progressives asked for help from the government and they agreed. Amendments were passed to help citizens. Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition were two of these amendments. Read more...iWorksheets :3Study Guides :1
36 Explain how the 20th century African American Civil Rights movement served as a model for other movements for civil rights (e.g., the second phase of the women’s movement in the 1960s and 1970s, the disability rights movement, the LGBTQ movement).
African American HistoryAfrican-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Read more...iWorksheets :4Study Guides :1
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