What's New: Social Studies Worksheets and Study Guides

Being a Good Citizen Kindergarten Social Studies
Geography Kindergarten Social Studies
Needs and Wants First Grade Social Studies
Important People & Events Kindergarten Social Studies
Important People & Events Kindergarten Social Studies
Being a Good Citizen Kindergarten Social Studies
My Community Kindergarten Social Studies

Vermont Standards for Eighth Grade Social Studies

VT.6.1. Critical Evaluation: Causes and Effects in Human Societies: Students examine complex webs of causes and effects in relations to events in order to generalize about the workings of human societies, and they apply their findings to problems.

H&SS7-8:1. Grade Level Expectation: Social and Historical Questioning: Students initiate an inquiry by:

7-8:1.a. Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

H&SS7-8:6. Grade Level Expectation: Students make connections to research by:

7-8:6.e. Proposing further investigations.

VT.6.10. Citizenship: Types of Government: Students compare and evaluate the philosophical underpinnings and the workings of different types of governments, including constitutional governments, in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:14. Grade Level Expectation: Students act as citizens by:

7-8:14.h. Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

H&SS7-8:15. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of various forms of government by:

7-8:15.b. Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).
7-8:15.c. Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.
7-8:15.e. Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

H&SS7-8:16. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how different societies address issues of human interdependence by:

7-8:16.a. Analyzing a current or historic issue related to human, rights, and explaining how the values of the time or place influenced the issue (e.g. Kosovo, China, Vietnam).
7-8:16.b. Analyzing how shared values and beliefs can maintain a subculture (e.g., political parties, religious groups).
7-8:16.c. Describing the purposes and functions of governmental and nongovernmental international organizations (e.g., the United Nations, NATO, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).
7-8:16.e. Analyzing differences and similarities among people that arise from factors such as cultural, ethnic, racial, economic, and religious diversity, and describing their costs and benefits.
7-8:16.h. Analyzing behaviors that foster global cooperation among groups and governments (e.g., lowering trade barriers).
7-8:16.i. Explaining conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to tensions and/or conflict within and among individuals, communities, and nations (e.g., investigating the relationship between poverty and conflict).

H&SS7-8:17. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how access to various institutions affects justice, reward, and power by:

7-8:17.a. Comparing how different groups gain or have been denied access to various institutions, and describing the impact this has had on these groups in the US and other countries (e.g., Property ownership for voting, ageism, access to education; affirmative action, due process, petition).

VT.6.11. Citizenship: Institutional Access: Students analyze the access that various groups and individuals have had to justice, reward, and power, as those are evident in the institutions in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:14. Grade Level Expectation: Students act as citizens by:

7-8:14.h. Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

H&SS7-8:15. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of various forms of government by:

7-8:15.b. Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).
7-8:15.c. Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.
7-8:15.e. Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

H&SS7-8:16. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how different societies address issues of human interdependence by:

7-8:16.a. Analyzing a current or historic issue related to human, rights, and explaining how the values of the time or place influenced the issue (e.g. Kosovo, China, Vietnam).
7-8:16.b. Analyzing how shared values and beliefs can maintain a subculture (e.g., political parties, religious groups).
7-8:16.c. Describing the purposes and functions of governmental and nongovernmental international organizations (e.g., the United Nations, NATO, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).
7-8:16.h. Analyzing behaviors that foster global cooperation among groups and governments (e.g., lowering trade barriers).

H&SS7-8:17. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how access to various institutions affects justice, reward, and power by:

7-8:17.a. Comparing how different groups gain or have been denied access to various institutions, and describing the impact this has had on these groups in the US and other countries (e.g., Property ownership for voting, ageism, access to education; affirmative action, due process, petition).

VT.6.12. Citizenship: Human Rights: Students identify and evaluate the concept of human rights in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:14. Grade Level Expectation: Students act as citizens by:

7-8:14.h. Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

H&SS7-8:15. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of various forms of government by:

7-8:15.b. Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).
7-8:15.c. Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.
7-8:15.e. Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

H&SS7-8:16. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how different societies address issues of human interdependence by:

7-8:16.a. Analyzing a current or historic issue related to human, rights, and explaining how the values of the time or place influenced the issue (e.g. Kosovo, China, Vietnam).
7-8:16.b. Analyzing how shared values and beliefs can maintain a subculture (e.g., political parties, religious groups).
7-8:16.c. Describing the purposes and functions of governmental and nongovernmental international organizations (e.g., the United Nations, NATO, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).
7-8:16.h. Analyzing behaviors that foster global cooperation among groups and governments (e.g., lowering trade barriers).

H&SS7-8:17. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how access to various institutions affects justice, reward, and power by:

7-8:17.a. Comparing how different groups gain or have been denied access to various institutions, and describing the impact this has had on these groups in the US and other countries (e.g., Property ownership for voting, ageism, access to education; affirmative action, due process, petition).

VT.6.13. Diversity and Unity: Concepts of Culture: Students understand the concept of culture, including the cultures of indigenous peoples, in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:11. Grade Level Expectation: Students interpret geography and solve geographic problems by:

7-8:11.a. Identifying characteristics of states, countries, and continents using resources such as landmarks, models, different kinds of maps, photographs, atlases, internet, video, reference materials, GIS and mental mapping.
7-8:11.b. Observing, comparing, and analyzing patterns of national, and global land use (e.g., agriculture, forestry, industry) to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities.
7-8:11.e. Using absolute and relative location to identifying major mountain ranges, major rivers, and major climate and vegetation zones and the effects of these on settlement patterns (e.g., Appalachian Mountain's effect on westward movement; overgrazing; Palestinian/Israeli conflict).
7-8:11.f. Interpreting a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs and project future changes (e.g., physical, political, topographic, computer generated, and special purpose maps).
7-8:11.g. Identifying and using basic elements of a variety of maps.
7-8:11.i. Comparing and contrasting spatial patterns or landforms using geographic resources (e.g., comparing water usage between nations).

H&SS7-8:12. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of human interaction with the environment over time by:

7-8:12.c. Evaluating different viewpoints regarding resource use in the U.S. and world (e.g., debating drilling for oil in a national wildlife refuge).
7-8:12.d. Examining multiple factors in the interaction of humans and the environment (e.g., population size, farmland, and food production).

H&SS7-8:13. Grade Level Expectation: Students analyze how and why cultures continue and change over time by:

7-8:13.b. Describing the contributions of various cultural groups to the world, both past and present.
7-8:13.c. Analyzing how location and spatial patterns influence the spread of cultural traits (e.g., comparing clothing, food, religion/values, government, and art across four ancient cultures in relation to location).

VT.6.15. Economics: Knowledge of Economic Principles: Students use the basic principles of economics to interpret local, state, national, and international economic activity.

H&SS7-8:18. Grade Level Expectation: Students show an understanding of the interaction/ interdependence between humans, the environment, and the economy by:

7-8:18.a. Explaining how goods and services around the world create economic interdependence between people in different places (e.g., writing a persuasive essay about the effects of importing oil, exporting labor, etc.).
7-8:18.b. Examining how producers in the U.S. and/or world have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services, and predicting the long term effects of these uses (e.g., describing how the use of petroleum products will impact the production of hybrid vehicles; examining how the use of human resources in the U.S. has changed over time).

H&SS7-8:19. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of the interconnectedness between government and the economy by:

7-8:19.a. Identifying goods and services provided by local, state, national, and international governmental and/or nongovernmental organizations (e.g., Red Cross, UN peacekeeping efforts, etc.).
7-8:19.c. Explaining the relationship between taxation and governmental goods and services in the U.S. and/or world (e.g., how much of the federal budget is devoted to international aid?).
7-8:19.d. Recognizing that governments around the world create their own currency for use as money (e.g., examining foreign currency for cultural and political symbols).

H&SS7-8:20. Grade Level Expectation: Students make economic decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen by:

7-8:20.a. Define and apply basic economic concepts such as supply and demand, price, market and/or opportunity cost in an investigation of a regional, national, or international economic question or problem (e.g., In Colombia, what could be an alternative agricultural product to coca?).
7-8:20.d. Analyzing influences on buying and saving (e.g., media, peers).

VT.6.16. Economics: Impact of Economic Systems: Students evaluate the impact of economic systems on the needs and wants of all people and on the environment in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:18. Grade Level Expectation: Students show an understanding of the interaction/ interdependence between humans, the environment, and the economy by:

7-8:18.a. Explaining how goods and services around the world create economic interdependence between people in different places (e.g., writing a persuasive essay about the effects of importing oil, exporting labor, etc.).
7-8:18.b. Examining how producers in the U.S. and/or world have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services, and predicting the long term effects of these uses (e.g., describing how the use of petroleum products will impact the production of hybrid vehicles; examining how the use of human resources in the U.S. has changed over time).

H&SS7-8:19. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of the interconnectedness between government and the economy by:

7-8:19.a. Identifying goods and services provided by local, state, national, and international governmental and/or nongovernmental organizations (e.g., Red Cross, UN peacekeeping efforts, etc.).
7-8:19.c. Explaining the relationship between taxation and governmental goods and services in the U.S. and/or world (e.g., how much of the federal budget is devoted to international aid?).
7-8:19.d. Recognizing that governments around the world create their own currency for use as money (e.g., examining foreign currency for cultural and political symbols).

H&SS7-8:20. Grade Level Expectation: Students make economic decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen by:

7-8:20.a. Define and apply basic economic concepts such as supply and demand, price, market and/or opportunity cost in an investigation of a regional, national, or international economic question or problem (e.g., In Colombia, what could be an alternative agricultural product to coca?).
7-8:20.d. Analyzing influences on buying and saving (e.g., media, peers).

VT.6.17. Economics: Governments and Resources: Students understand how governments affect the flow of resources, goods, and services.

H&SS7-8:18. Grade Level Expectation: Students show an understanding of the interaction/ interdependence between humans, the environment, and the economy by:

7-8:18.a. Explaining how goods and services around the world create economic interdependence between people in different places (e.g., writing a persuasive essay about the effects of importing oil, exporting labor, etc.).
7-8:18.b. Examining how producers in the U.S. and/or world have used natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services, and predicting the long term effects of these uses (e.g., describing how the use of petroleum products will impact the production of hybrid vehicles; examining how the use of human resources in the U.S. has changed over time).

H&SS7-8:19. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of the interconnectedness between government and the economy by:

7-8:19.a. Identifying goods and services provided by local, state, national, and international governmental and/or nongovernmental organizations (e.g., Red Cross, UN peacekeeping efforts, etc.).
7-8:19.c. Explaining the relationship between taxation and governmental goods and services in the U.S. and/or world (e.g., how much of the federal budget is devoted to international aid?).
7-8:19.d. Recognizing that governments around the world create their own currency for use as money (e.g., examining foreign currency for cultural and political symbols).

H&SS7-8:20. Grade Level Expectation: Students make economic decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen by:

7-8:20.a. Define and apply basic economic concepts such as supply and demand, price, market and/or opportunity cost in an investigation of a regional, national, or international economic question or problem (e.g., In Colombia, what could be an alternative agricultural product to coca?).
7-8:20.d. Analyzing influences on buying and saving (e.g., media, peers).

VT.6.2. Critical Evaluation: Uses of Evidence and Data: Students understand the varied uses of evidence and data, and use both to make interpretations concerning public issues.

H&SS7-8:1. Grade Level Expectation: Social and Historical Questioning: Students initiate an inquiry by:

7-8:1.a. Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

H&SS7-8:5. Grade Level Expectation: Conducting Research: Students develop reasonable explanations that support the research statement by:

7-8:5.c. Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, and/or justifying (e.g., analyzing information to determine why two historical accounts of the same event might differ.)

VT.6.3. Critical Evaluation: Analyzing Knowledge: Students analyze knowledge as a collection of selected facts and interpretations based on a particular historical or social setting.

H&SS7-8:1. Grade Level Expectation: Social and Historical Questioning: Students initiate an inquiry by:

7-8:1.a. Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

H&SS7-8:5. Grade Level Expectation: Conducting Research: Students develop reasonable explanations that support the research statement by:

7-8:5.c. Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, and/or justifying (e.g., analyzing information to determine why two historical accounts of the same event might differ.)

VT.6.4. History: Historical Connections: Students identify major historical eras and analyze periods of transition in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide, to interpret the influence of the past on the present.

H&SS7-8:1. Grade Level Expectation: Social and Historical Questioning: Students initiate an inquiry by:

7-8:1.a. Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

H&SS7-8:10. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of past, present, and future time by:

7-8:10.g. Identifying important events in the United States and/or world, and describing multiple causes and effects of those events.
7-8:10.h. Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time (e.g. independence of African nations) as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event (e.g., the invention of the automobile and the light bulb).
7-8:10.i. Identifying why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time (e.g., the explosion of the atom bomb and the beginning of the nuclear age; September 11, 2001).

H&SS7-8:5. Grade Level Expectation: Conducting Research: Students develop reasonable explanations that support the research statement by:

7-8:5.c. Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, and/or justifying (e.g., analyzing information to determine why two historical accounts of the same event might differ.)

H&SS7-8:8. Grade Level Expectation: Students connect the past with the present by:

7-8:8.a. Explaining differences between historic and present day objects in the United States and/or the world, and evaluating how the use of the object and the object itself changed over time (e.g., comparing modes of transportation used in past and present exploration in order to evaluate impact and the effects of those changes).
7-8:8.b. Describing ways that life in the United States and/or the world has both changed and stayed the same over time, and explaining why these changes have occurred (e.g., In what ways would the life of a teenager during the American Revolution be different from the life of a teenager today? What factors have contributed to these differences?).
7-8:8.c. Investigating and evaluating how events, people, and ideas (democracy, for example) have shaped the United States and the world, and hypothesizing how different influences could have led to different consequences (e.g., How did the ideals of Greek democracy impact the world? How has European colonialism influenced race relations in Africa?).

H&SS7-8:9. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of how humans interpret history by:

7-8:9.a. Identifying different types of primary and secondary sources (for example, visual, literary, and musical sources), and evaluating the possible biases expressed in them (e.g., analyzing Paul Revere's engraving of the Boston Massacre).
7-8:9.c. Evaluating the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s) (e.g., account of the Revolutionary War from a colonist's perspective vs. British perspective; the bombing of Hiroshima from the perspective of a Japanese citizen vs. an American soldier).

VT.6.5. History: Traditional and Social Histories: Students investigate both the traditional and the social histories of the people, places, and cultures under study, including those of indigenous peoples.

H&SS7-8:10. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of past, present, and future time by:

7-8:10.b. Constructing time lines of significant historical developments in the nation and world, designating appropriate equidistant intervals of time and recording events according to the order in which they occurred.
7-8:10.g. Identifying important events in the United States and/or world, and describing multiple causes and effects of those events.
7-8:10.h. Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time (e.g. independence of African nations) as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event (e.g., the invention of the automobile and the light bulb).
7-8:10.i. Identifying why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time (e.g., the explosion of the atom bomb and the beginning of the nuclear age; September 11, 2001).

H&SS7-8:8. Grade Level Expectation: Students connect the past with the present by:

7-8:8.a. Explaining differences between historic and present day objects in the United States and/or the world, and evaluating how the use of the object and the object itself changed over time (e.g., comparing modes of transportation used in past and present exploration in order to evaluate impact and the effects of those changes).
7-8:8.b. Describing ways that life in the United States and/or the world has both changed and stayed the same over time, and explaining why these changes have occurred (e.g., In what ways would the life of a teenager during the American Revolution be different from the life of a teenager today? What factors have contributed to these differences?).
7-8:8.c. Investigating and evaluating how events, people, and ideas (democracy, for example) have shaped the United States and the world, and hypothesizing how different influences could have led to different consequences (e.g., How did the ideals of Greek democracy impact the world? How has European colonialism influenced race relations in Africa?).
Medieval EuropeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Renaissance in EuropeWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Protestant ReformationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Scientific RevolutionFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1European Exploration and SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial SettlementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Colonial LifeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The American RevolutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Articles of ConfederationWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The United States ConstitutionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New Government in OperationWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Alamo Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Nation Grows and ExpandsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Erie Canal Worksheets :3Study Guides :1The Jackson Age Worksheets :3Study Guides :1Moving Southward and WestwardWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Abolitionist MovementWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Women's RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Causes of the Civil WarFreeWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Civil War Worksheets :4Study Guides :1Reconstruction after the Civil WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Industrial GrowthWorksheets :3Study Guides :1Progressive Era Worksheets :3Study Guides :1ExpansionismWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Roaring TwentiesWorksheets :3Study Guides :1The Great DepressionWorksheets :4Study Guides :1World War IIWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Cold WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Civil RightsWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The Vietnam WarWorksheets :4Study Guides :1The New MillenniumWorksheets :3Study Guides :1CanadaWorksheets :4Study Guides :1Central AmericaWorksheets :3Study Guides :1South AmericaWorksheets :3

H&SS7-8:9. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of how humans interpret history by:

7-8:9.a. Identifying different types of primary and secondary sources (for example, visual, literary, and musical sources), and evaluating the possible biases expressed in them (e.g., analyzing Paul Revere's engraving of the Boston Massacre).
7-8:9.c. Evaluating the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s) (e.g., account of the Revolutionary War from a colonist's perspective vs. British perspective; the bombing of Hiroshima from the perspective of a Japanese citizen vs. an American soldier).

VT.6.6. History: Being A Historian: Students use historical methodology to make interpretations concerning history, change, and continuity.

H&SS7-8:1. Grade Level Expectation: Social and Historical Questioning: Students initiate an inquiry by:

7-8:1.a. Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

H&SS7-8:10. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of past, present, and future time by:

7-8:10.h. Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time (e.g. independence of African nations) as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event (e.g., the invention of the automobile and the light bulb).
7-8:10.i. Identifying why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time (e.g., the explosion of the atom bomb and the beginning of the nuclear age; September 11, 2001).

H&SS7-8:5. Grade Level Expectation: Conducting Research: Students develop reasonable explanations that support the research statement by:

7-8:5.c. Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, and/or justifying (e.g., analyzing information to determine why two historical accounts of the same event might differ.)

H&SS7-8:8. Grade Level Expectation: Students connect the past with the present by:

7-8:8.c. Investigating and evaluating how events, people, and ideas (democracy, for example) have shaped the United States and the world, and hypothesizing how different influences could have led to different consequences (e.g., How did the ideals of Greek democracy impact the world? How has European colonialism influenced race relations in Africa?).

H&SS7-8:9. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of how humans interpret history by:

7-8:9.a. Identifying different types of primary and secondary sources (for example, visual, literary, and musical sources), and evaluating the possible biases expressed in them (e.g., analyzing Paul Revere's engraving of the Boston Massacre).
7-8:9.c. Evaluating the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s) (e.g., account of the Revolutionary War from a colonist's perspective vs. British perspective; the bombing of Hiroshima from the perspective of a Japanese citizen vs. an American soldier).

VT.6.7. Geography: Geographical Knowledge: Students use geographical knowledge and images of various places to understand the present, communicate historical interpretations, develop solutions for problems, and plan for the future.

H&SS7-8:11. Grade Level Expectation: Students interpret geography and solve geographic problems by:

7-8:11.a. Identifying characteristics of states, countries, and continents using resources such as landmarks, models, different kinds of maps, photographs, atlases, internet, video, reference materials, GIS and mental mapping.
7-8:11.b. Observing, comparing, and analyzing patterns of national, and global land use (e.g., agriculture, forestry, industry) to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities.
7-8:11.e. Using absolute and relative location to identifying major mountain ranges, major rivers, and major climate and vegetation zones and the effects of these on settlement patterns (e.g., Appalachian Mountain's effect on westward movement; overgrazing; Palestinian/Israeli conflict).
7-8:11.f. Interpreting a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs and project future changes (e.g., physical, political, topographic, computer generated, and special purpose maps).
7-8:11.g. Identifying and using basic elements of a variety of maps.
7-8:11.i. Comparing and contrasting spatial patterns or landforms using geographic resources (e.g., comparing water usage between nations).

H&SS7-8:12. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of human interaction with the environment over time by:

7-8:12.a. Describing how human activity and technology have changed the environment in the U.S. and world for specific purposes (e.g., development of urban environments, genetic modification of crops, flood control, reforestation).
7-8:12.b. Generating information related to the impact of human activities on the physical environment (for example, through field studies, mapping, interviewing, and using scientific instruments) in order to draw conclusions and recommend actions (e.g., damming the Yangtze River).
7-8:12.c. Evaluating different viewpoints regarding resource use in the U.S. and world (e.g., debating drilling for oil in a national wildlife refuge).

H&SS7-8:13. Grade Level Expectation: Students analyze how and why cultures continue and change over time by:

7-8:13.c. Analyzing how location and spatial patterns influence the spread of cultural traits (e.g., comparing clothing, food, religion/values, government, and art across four ancient cultures in relation to location).
7-8:13.d. Identifying ways in which culture in the United States and the world has changed and may change in the future (e.g., the spread of Islam).

VT.6.8. Geography: Movements and Settlements: Students analyze the factors and implications associated with the historical and contemporary movements and settlements of people and groups in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations world wide.

H&SS7-8:11. Grade Level Expectation: Students interpret geography and solve geographic problems by:

7-8:11.a. Identifying characteristics of states, countries, and continents using resources such as landmarks, models, different kinds of maps, photographs, atlases, internet, video, reference materials, GIS and mental mapping.
7-8:11.b. Observing, comparing, and analyzing patterns of national, and global land use (e.g., agriculture, forestry, industry) to understand why particular locations are used for certain human activities.
7-8:11.e. Using absolute and relative location to identifying major mountain ranges, major rivers, and major climate and vegetation zones and the effects of these on settlement patterns (e.g., Appalachian Mountain's effect on westward movement; overgrazing; Palestinian/Israeli conflict).
7-8:11.f. Interpreting a variety of effective representations of the earth such as maps, globes, and photographs and project future changes (e.g., physical, political, topographic, computer generated, and special purpose maps).
7-8:11.g. Identifying and using basic elements of a variety of maps.
7-8:11.i. Comparing and contrasting spatial patterns or landforms using geographic resources (e.g., comparing water usage between nations).

H&SS7-8:12. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of human interaction with the environment over time by:

7-8:12.b. Generating information related to the impact of human activities on the physical environment (for example, through field studies, mapping, interviewing, and using scientific instruments) in order to draw conclusions and recommend actions (e.g., damming the Yangtze River).
7-8:12.c. Evaluating different viewpoints regarding resource use in the U.S. and world (e.g., debating drilling for oil in a national wildlife refuge).

H&SS7-8:13. Grade Level Expectation: Students analyze how and why cultures continue and change over time by:

7-8:13.c. Analyzing how location and spatial patterns influence the spread of cultural traits (e.g., comparing clothing, food, religion/values, government, and art across four ancient cultures in relation to location).
7-8:13.d. Identifying ways in which culture in the United States and the world has changed and may change in the future (e.g., the spread of Islam).

VT.6.9. Citizenship: Meaning of Citizenship: Students examine and debate the meaning of citizenship and act as citizens in a democratic society.

H&SS7-8:14. Grade Level Expectation: Students act as citizens by:

7-8:14.h. Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

H&SS7-8:15. Grade Level Expectation: Students show understanding of various forms of government by:

7-8:15.b. Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).
7-8:15.c. Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.
7-8:15.e. Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

H&SS7-8:16. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how different societies address issues of human interdependence by:

7-8:16.a. Analyzing a current or historic issue related to human, rights, and explaining how the values of the time or place influenced the issue (e.g. Kosovo, China, Vietnam).
7-8:16.b. Analyzing how shared values and beliefs can maintain a subculture (e.g., political parties, religious groups).
7-8:16.c. Describing the purposes and functions of governmental and nongovernmental international organizations (e.g., the United Nations, NATO, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).
7-8:16.h. Analyzing behaviors that foster global cooperation among groups and governments (e.g., lowering trade barriers).

H&SS7-8:17. Grade Level Expectation: Students examine how access to various institutions affects justice, reward, and power by:

7-8:17.a. Comparing how different groups gain or have been denied access to various institutions, and describing the impact this has had on these groups in the US and other countries (e.g., Property ownership for voting, ageism, access to education; affirmative action, due process, petition).

NewPath Learning resources are fully aligned to US Education Standards. Select a standard below to view correlations to your selected resource:

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